Navigation Links
Obesity, physical inactivity linked with risk for certain molecular subtype of colorectal cancer

PHILADELPHIA An increasing body mass index was associated with a higher risk for colorectal cancer with a specific molecular characteristic, and inversely, physical activity was linked to a decreased risk for that same cancer, according to data published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

"We know that exercise and avoiding obesity decrease colorectal cancer risk, but little is known about why," said Shuji Ogino, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of pathology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and associate professor in the Department of Epidemiology at Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, Mass. "In this study, we used a biomarker named CTNNB1, which is a molecule implicated in cancer and obesity, to divide patients into two groups, CTNNB1-positive and CTNNB1-negative."

Ogino and colleagues used data from more than 100,000 women from the Nurses' Health Study and more than 45,000 men in the Health Professionals Study to examine whether there was an association between body mass index (BMI) or exercise activity and colorectal cancer risk according to CTNNB1 expression status.

Among the study population, 2,263 individuals were diagnosed with colorectal cancer during follow-up. Tumor CTNNB1 expression data were available for 861 of these individuals, and 54 percent of these tumors were negative for CTNNB1 and 46 percent positive for the biomarker.

Increasing BMI by a 5.0 kg/m2 increment was associated with a 34 percent higher risk for CTNNB1-negative cancer, but was not associated with CTNNB1-positive cancer. In contrast, increasing physical activity level was associated with a significantly lower risk for CTNNB1-negative cancer. It was not associated with CTNNB1-positive cancer.

"Our results provide additional evidence for a causal role of obesity and a physically inactive lifestyle in a specific molecular subtype of colorectal cancer," Ogino said. "If physicians are able to identify individuals who are prone to develop CTNNB1-negative cancer, then it would be possible to strongly recommend physical activity."

In addition, the data indicated that CTNNB1 could be a potential target for chemoprevention and treatment, according to Ogino. He called for more population-based, large-scale databases to facilitate molecular pathological epidemiology research.

"Currently, most population-based studies do not take tumor heterogeneity into consideration, and typically colon cancer is treated as a single disease," Ogino said. "We need to integrate molecular pathology and epidemiology in education and research to facilitate integrative science and improve public health."


Contact: Jeremy Moore
American Association for Cancer Research

Related medicine news :

1. Outdoor Fast-Food Ads Linked to Obesity, Study Suggests
2. Obesity, excess weight gain during pregnancy linked to heavier babies in African-American women
3. Researchers identify role for protein linked to obesity, type 2 diabetes
4. Use Social Media to Fight Childhood Obesity, Heart Experts Say
5. Study Supports Link Between Obesity, Cavities in Homeless Kids
6. In obesity, a micro-RNA causes metabolic problems
7. What babies eat after birth likely determines lifetime risk of obesity, rat study suggests
8. Obesity, larger waist size associated with better outcomes in heart failure patients
9. Wayne State University researcher seeks to understand link between obesity, flu severity
10. Obesity, A Contributing Cause Of Arthritis Of The Knee, Is Now Being Treated With Regenerative Medicine At The Center For Regenerative Medicine
11. Peaches, plums, nectarines give obesity, diabetes slim chance
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... An inventor, ... to dispense prescription medications at home, so he invented the patent-pending ELECTRONIC M.D. ... dispense prescription medications. In doing so, it could help to prevent potential overdose ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... ... No.1 Herpes-only dating community in the world, revealed that over 50% of its members are ... people under the age of 50 – or 67% of the population - are infected ... HSV-1 infection . , "The data shocks us highly!" said Michelle Li, Co-Founder of ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... Keeping ... platform for mental health and wellness consultation, has collaborated with a leading web-based ... the knowledge gap experienced by parents and bring advice from parenting experts within ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... (PRWEB) , ... November 27, 2015 , ... ... contact center software Q-Suite, announces the incorporation of Asterisk 11 LTS (Long Term ... fully supported Asterisk 11 LTS brings Q-Suite 5.10 up-to-date with a version of ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... ... November 26, 2015 , ... The Catalent Applied Drug ... need to integrate dose form selection in early phase drug development. The first ... supporting and bringing together the UK’s emerging life sciences companies, corporate partners, and ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/26/2015)... 26, 2015 ... of the  "2016 Future Horizons and ... Surface Marker Testing Market: Supplier Shares, ... their offering.  --> ... the  "2016 Future Horizons and Growth ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... 2015  The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), ... the March of Dimes cheered today,s signature into ... Act of 2015 (S.799), which takes much-needed ... exposed to drugs, such as opioids, and to ... three organizations have worked together leading advocacy efforts ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... 2015  ARKRAY USA , Inc., ... evidence demonstrating the accuracy of its blood glucose meter ... Resistance, Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease in Los ... GLUCOCARD ® 01 meter and the Assure ® ... ability to accurately measure glucose levels in blood is ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: