Navigation Links
OHSU Cancer Institute finds that drug stimulated immune system in prostate cancer
Date:6/2/2008

PORTLAND, Ore. In a multi-site study, Oregon Health & Science University Cancer Institute researchers have found that a drug called Ipilimumab, also known as MDX-010, works to stimulate the body's own immune system to fight prostate cancer. The drug was found to be effective in study participants with a serious type of prostate cancer one where the tumor has spread and was resistant to hormonal treatment and, in some cases, also to chemotherapy.

Darryl Pape was one of 19 participants in the Oregon Health & Science University Cancer Institute trial.

"I was in such bad shape. I couldn't even sit on a plane for more than two hours without a lot of pain. I was praying for some clinical trial that would help," said Pape, 54, of Portland, Ore.

Pape was running out of options for his prostate cancer. He was diagnosed almost seven years ago and had tried different cancer drugs, but each only for a while. Last year his cancer count, or prostate specific antigen (PSA), was at a high level -- an indicator that his cancer was growing and spreading and it was not responding to any drugs.

A prostate-specific antigen test measures the amount of prostate-specific antigen in the blood. PSA is released into a man's blood by his prostate gland. Healthy men have low amounts of PSA in the blood. PSA may increase as a result of prostate cancer.

Pape, a very religious man, was looking for a miracle. He found one when he was eligible for a clinical trial testing the effectiveness of Ipilimumab, at the OHSU Cancer Institute. After the first infusion of the drug, Pape said he could feel it working. After the second infusion, he said his symptoms went away.

"I felt great at that point," he said.

Not everyone has the same response, and Pape did suffer some side effects. But one year later, Pape is in complete remission.

"I got my life back," he said.

Tomasz Beer, M.D., a member of the OHSU Cancer Institute, will be giving the oral presentation on this research Monday, June 2, at 11:30 a.m. during the annual American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago.

"From what we have seen, this shows that the immune system can be useful to treat prostate cancer. Results show that in some patients, the immune system can be successfully harnessed to cause cancer regressions, and that is both exciting and encouraging," said Beer, the Grover C. Bagby Endowed Chair for Cancer Research, director of the Prostate Cancer Research Program at the OHSU Cancer Institute, associate professor of medicine (hematology/medical oncology), OHSU School of Medicine.

It was confirmed that seven or 21 percent, of the 33 study participants had PSA declines of 50 percent.

The secret to how the drug works lies in a complex set of interactions in the immune system. The immune system is designed to attack foreign invaders such as viruses and bacteria, sending out a barrage of T-cells to destroy it through inflammation or direct killing. The immune system is also thought to play a role in surveillance for the detection and elimination of altered cells of the body, such as cancer cells. Whether a cancer progresses or not depends, in part, on the ability of the cancer to evade the immune response. One way in which cancer cells can evade the immune system is to take advantage of natural controls of the immune response that act to dial down, or down regulate, the strength of the response and allow the tumor to grow.

Scientists have discovered that an important mechanism for down regulation is mediated by a molecule called CTLA-4. The T cells are initially activated by other immune cells, called dendritic cells, that display the foreign, or cancerous, antigens to the T cells and instruct them to be active. After this initial activation, CTLA-4 appears on the surface of the T cells, and when CTLA-4 interacts with the dendritic cells, the next set of signals are to turn the response down, or even off. CTLA-4 is part of a regulatory mechanism that normally protects the body from immune overreactions, but when it is expressed in the presence of mutant cancer cells the result is tumor evasion of the immune response. Ipilimumab is an antibody that blocks CTLA-4, releasing this safety brake, and allowing the immune response to have a stronger anti-tumor effect.


'/>"/>

Contact: Christine Decker
deckerch@ohsu.edu
503-494-8231
Oregon Health & Science University
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Eva Longoria Parker Participates in 5k Run/Walk to Raise Money for Children With Cancer and Offers Support to Univision Talent Fernando Del Rincons Cancer Diagnosis
2. One A Day(R) and Major League Baseball Raise Over $106,000 to Strike Out Prostate Cancer
3. Vaccine May Boost Survival of Brain Cancer Patients
4. Blocking signaling protein prevents prostate cancer spread, Jefferson scientists find
5. New treatment combination safe for pancreatic cancer patients
6. 3-Drug Combo Improves Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Outcomes
7. U.S. Childhood Cancers Vary by Sex, Region
8. Erbitux Works Well for Two-Thirds of Colon Cancer Patients
9. Anemia Drugs May Speed Tumor Growth in Some Cancer Patients
10. Celebrex May Reduce Levels of Lung Cancer Biomarker
11. Young Hodgkin Survivors Face Later Risk of Second Cancers
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:10/13/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... ... established the certification process to promote standards of excellence for the field of ... scheduled for March 22 – 25, 2018 in Orlando, Florida at the Omni ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Lori R. Somekh, founder of the Law Office of ... elder law and special needs planning attorneys. “Membership in ElderCounsel helps our office remain ... to network with elder law attorneys nationwide,” said Somekh. , ElderCounsel ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... The Visiting Nurse Association (VNA) of ... collection of specialty vendors and unique items from across the nation, this holiday-themed event ... wellness services offered by the VNA. The boutique will be open Saturday, November ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... Yisrayl Hawkins, Pastor and Overseer at The House ... most popular and least understood books in the Holy Scriptures, Revelation. The Book of ... baffled scholars for centuries. Many have tossed it off as mere rubbish, but Yisrayl ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... ... Journey: From the Mountains to the Mission Field”: the story of a missionary couple ... From the Mountains to the Mission Field” is the creation of published author, Carole ... and currently teaches a class of ladies at her church, which she has taught ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/10/2017)... , Oct. 10, 2017   West Pharmaceutical ... innovative solutions for injectable drug administration, today shared the ... ID Adapter for improving the intradermal administration of polio ... Skin Vaccination Summit in May 2017 by Dr. ... Polio Department, World Health Organization (WHO), and recently published ...
(Date:10/4/2017)... 4, 2017 OBP Medical , ... medical devices, today announced regulatory approval from ... (or Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária (ANVISA)) to ... surgical retractor with integrated LED light source and ... and exposure of a tissue pocket or cavity ...
(Date:10/2/2017)... Denmark , Oct. 2, 2017 The Rebound ... in the struggle to reverse the tide of prescription drug ... for regulating their medicine intake and stepping down their dosage ... set to launch in December 2017; the first 100,000 people ... Learn more at http://www.rebound-solution.com/ ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: