Navigation Links
Novel approach strips staph of virulence
Date:2/14/2008

An international team of researchers supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has blocked staph infections in mice using a drug previously tested in clinical trials as a cholesterol-lowering agent. The novel approach, described in the February 14 online edition of Science, could offer a new direction for therapies against a bacterium thats becoming increasingly resistant to antibiotics.

By following their scientific instinct about a basic biological process, the researchers made a surprising discovery with important clinical implications, said NIH Director Elias A. Zerhouni, M.D. Although the results are still very preliminary, they offer a promising new lead for developing drugs to treat a very timely and medically important health concern.

This work was supported by three NIH components: the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

A pigment similar to the one that gives carrots their color turns Staphylococcus aureus (staph) golden. In the bacterium, this pigment acts as an antioxidant to block the reactive oxygen molecules the immune system uses to kill bacteria.

Researchers had speculated that blocking pigment formation in staph could restore the immune systems ability to thwart infection. While perusing a magazine on microbial research, Eric Oldfield, Ph.D., of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign read how in 2005 University of California, San Diego researchers knocked out a gene in staphs pigment-making pathway to create colorlessand less pathogenicbacteria.

I looked at the metabolic pathway and noticed that it was similar to the one for the production of cholesterol in humans, said Oldfield, senior author of the Science paper, who had spent decades studying this pathway. With numerous cholesterol-lowering drugs already on the market and in development, he wondered if any could turn staph colorless and make them once again susceptible to the immune system.

Colleagues in Taiwan determined the structure of the enzyme that triggers the first critical step in staphs pigment formation and observed striking similarities to an enzyme involved in human cholesterol production. They also captured the structures of several cholesterol-lowering drugs bound to the bacterial enzyme.

Building on their 2005 research that sparked the current study, Victor Nizet, M.D., and George Liu, M.D., Ph.D., now at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, Calif., tested eight different drug compounds that act on the human cholesterol enzyme. Three blocked pigment production in laboratory tests. When the researchers treated mice infected with S. aureus with one of the compounds, the bacterial population was reduced by 98 percent.

Because the approach reduces the virulence of the bacteria by stopping pigment production, it may not cause selective pressures on the population, which can lead to antibiotic resistance. It also targets only S. aureus, possibly reducing side effects.

This is an entirely new approach that seems to work in animals, and now we need to take the next step to explore if it will work in humans, said Oldfield.


'/>"/>

Contact: Emily Carlson
carlsone@nigms.nih.gov
301-496-7301
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. UCSD research team identifies novel anticancer drug from the sea
2. Novel compound may lessen heart attack damage
3. Novel molecules developed at UB can boost vaccine potency
4. Novel small molecule therapy shows benefit for anemic patients via hydration of red blood cells
5. Novel vaccine concept developed by scientists at the Wistar Institute
6. Tibotec Pharmaceuticals a Respectful Partner to HIV Community in Pricing of Novel New HIV NNRTI, INTELENCE
7. Millennium and Harvard Medical School Sign Cooperative Agreement for Research in Novel Field of Cancer Biology
8. Statement by AARP CEO Bill Novelli on President Bushs State of the Union
9. New method enables design, production of extremely novel drugs
10. Nerites Receives NIH Grant to Study Novel Treatment for Preventing Dangerous Bacterial Infections on Urinary Stents and Catheters
11. Speedy Procedures Demonstrate Excitement and Continued Interest in Novel Multi-Electrode Ablation System
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... ... Markarian, DDS, are co-chairs for the Illinois State Dental Society (ISDS) Foundation’s Mission ... at the Gateway Convention Center in Collinsville. , They expect to ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... LAKEWOOD, Colo., USA (PRWEB) , ... June 23, ... ... company, and Sanquin Blood Supply Foundation, a not-for-profit organization responsible for clinical transfusion ... completion of patient enrollment for the Pathogen Reduction Evaluation and Predictive Analytical Rating ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... ... 23, 2016 , ... SyncDog, Inc. , the leading ... is featured in the current issue of Silicon Review magazine. Silicon ... technology solutions and features them in their magazine. The magazine allows top-level executives ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... NJ (PRWEB) , ... June 23, 2016 , ... ... today’s Appellate Court ruling a victory for consumers seeking relief from the crushing ... Docket No. A2913-15T2 & A2929-15T2. , In their ruling ( http://www.judiciary.state.nj.us/opinions/a2913-15a2929-15.pdf ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... Nationwide (PRWEB) , ... June 23, 2016 , ... A ... Washington DC area, which is one of the best known examples of areas that ... already amassed almost a thousand daily users. , Any participant within the marijuana ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)...   Pulmatrix, Inc ., (NASDAQ: PULM ... announced today that it was added to the Russell ... comprehensive set of U.S. and global equity indexes on ... milestone for Pulmatrix," said Chief Executive Officer Robert ... progress in developing drugs for crucial unmet medical needs, ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... Research and Markets has announced the addition of ... report to their offering. ... kidney failure, it replaces the function of kidneys by removing ... thus the treatment helps to keep the patient body,s electrolytes ... Increasing number of ESRD patients & substantial healthcare expenditure ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016 Roche (SIX: ... 510(k) clearance for its Elecsys BRAHMS PCT (procalcitonin) assay ... sepsis or septic shock. With this clearance, Roche is ... a fully integrated solution for sepsis risk assessment and ... with bacterial infection and PCT levels in blood can ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: