Navigation Links
No Benefit From Niacin for Heart Patients in Study
Date:11/15/2011

By Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, Nov. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with cardiovascular disease who add niacin to the statin drug Zocor (simvastatin) to help lower their cholesterol get no additional clinical benefit, a new study finds.

Even though niacin appeared to increase HDL cholesterol -- the good cholesterol -- and decrease triglycerides, another type of fat in the blood, it did not reduce the risk of heart attack, stroke or death, the researchers found.

"The data we had previously on niacin was not very strong and mostly came from one very old study," said Dr. Robert Giugliano, from the cardiovascular medicine division at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston, who was not involved with the study.

The report was published online Nov. 15 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with the presentation of the findings at an American Heart Association meeting in Orlando, Fla.

Giugliano, who is author of an accompanying journal editorial, said the trial showed no benefit, but unexpectedly showed an increase in stroke. "Although that signal is not definite," he said.

The trial, called the Aim-High trial, was stopped in May, 18 months early because there was no proven benefit to niacin -- also known as vitamin B3 -- and an increased risk of stroke.

For the study, a team led by Dr. William Boden, a professor of medicine at the University of Buffalo in New York, randomly assigned more than 3,400 patients to receive high-dose, time-released niacin or a placebo. Patients in both groups took Zocor.

During an average follow-up period of three years, 16.4 percent of patients taking niacin had a heart attack, stroke, died from heart disease, were hospitalized or needed blocked arteries opened, compared with 16.2 percent of the patients receiving a placebo, the researchers found.

However, 1.6 percent of the patients taking niacin suffered a stroke, compared with 0.9 percent of patients taking the placebo.

Giugliano noted that another, larger trial of niacin is in progress, results of which are expected in 2013.

Niacin might be useful for patients who cannot take statins, he said. "So niacin may still have a role," he added.

However, Giugliano does not recommend patients start taking niacin. "One brand, Niaspan, sold almost $800 million worth last year. But, it's hard to support high-volume sales for a drug that doesn't have any good recent data to support it," he said.

The trial was funded by the U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute with support from Abbott Laboratories, which provided the Niaspan. Drug maker Merck Pharmaceuticals provided the Zocor.

Another expert, Dr. Gregg Fonarow, a professor of cardiology at the University of California, Los Angeles, and a spokesman for the American Heart Association, commented that "LDL-lowering with statin therapy dramatically lowers the risk of cardiovascular events in patients with established coronary heart disease."

It has been commonly held that raising HDL and lowering triglyceride levels would be beneficial, even among patients who have achieved optimal levels with statin therapy, he said. LDL is known as "bad cholesterol."

"AIM-High has demonstrated that among patients with established cardiovascular disease, there was no clinical benefit with the addition of extended release niacin to statin therapy despite increases in HDL and decreases in triglyceride. Further there was an unexpected increase in stroke risk with niacin," Fonarow said.

"These findings challenge the commonly held hypothesis that HDL raising and triglyceride lowering is of benefit to patients with coronary heart disease, though further studies are needed," he added.

Aggressive LDL-lowering with statin therapy remains the evidence-based, guideline-recommended, gold standard for benefiting patients with and at risk for cardiovascular disease, Fonarow said.

More information

For more on cardiovascular disease, visit the American Heart Association.

SOURCES: Gregg Fonarow, M.D., professor of cardiology, University of California, Los Angeles, spokesman for the American Heart Association; Robert P. Giugliano, M.D., Cardiovascular Medicine Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston; Nov. 15, 2011, presentation, American Heart Association annual meeting, Orlando, Fla.; Nov. 15, 2011, New England Journal of Medicine, online


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Former Football Players Brains May Benefit From Healthy Lifestyle
2. Cooking Class Benefits Kids in Many Ways
3. Quality of life benefits of transcatheter aortic valve replacement differ by access site
4. Concurrent chemo and radiation confers survival benefit in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients
5. Benefits of nut consumption for people with abdominal obesity, high blood sugar, high blood pressure
6. Increased use of bikes for commuting offers economic, health benefits
7. Glaucoma Experts Eye Benefits of Exercise
8. Religious, spiritual support benefits men and women facing chronic illness, MU study finds
9. Parental Training May Benefit ADHD Kids Under 6: Report
10. Heart surgeons-in-training benefit from hands-on homework
11. USDA research demonstrates new breeds of broccoli remain packed with health benefits
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
No Benefit From Niacin for Heart Patients in Study 
(Date:6/20/2017)... ... ... As a leading dental practice, Wall Centre Dental supports Stroke Awareness Month ... bleeding gums in Vancouver, BC, may be developing gingivitis, the first stage of ... and diabetes. Drs. Parviz Roshan, Siamak Tehrani and Milton Reskovich offer laser gum therapy ...
(Date:6/20/2017)... ... June 20, 2017 , ... This year, participants in the ... finding product improvements that could reduce the occurrence of unplanned extubations (UEs). ... breathing or to provide medication. Sometimes, patient movement can cause unplanned extubations which ...
(Date:6/20/2017)... ... June 20, 2017 , ... Uniform Advantage ... featuring seven new products designed to create tailored looks and athleisure-inspired outfits. UA Flex ... cotton easy care stretch twill. , With trendy looks hitting the medical community, UA ...
(Date:6/20/2017)... ... , ... John D'Eri, CEO of Rising Tide Car Wash , will ... during the Autism Society of America 's 49th annual conference to be held ... (DJFF) was founded in 2002 as the nation's first autism organization focused exclusively ...
(Date:6/20/2017)... ... June 20, 2017 , ... International water ... The Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water, Global Climate Change and Your Health ... world’s water crisis and how it affects the human eyes. , According ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/9/2017)... , June 9, 2017 AirXpanders, Inc. ... focused on the design, manufacture, sale and distribution of ... on the progress of its commercial roll-out in ... available in more than one hundred (100) medical institutions ... AeroForm offers a needle-free alternative for women who ...
(Date:6/7/2017)... -- Endo International plc (NASDAQ: ENDP ) ... Joseph R. Goodwin , U.S. District Court Judge for ... , entered a case management order in MDL 2325, ... Litigation (the "MDL") that includes a provision requiring plaintiffs ... on specific causation within one hundred twenty (120) days ...
(Date:6/3/2017)... June 3, 2017  Eli Lilly and Company ... results from the Phase 3 MONARCH 2 study ... 6 inhibitor, in combination with fulvestrant, significantly improved ... alone in women with hormone-receptor-positive (HR+), human epidermal ... who have relapsed or progressed after endocrine therapy ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: