Navigation Links
News briefs from the August issue of Chest
Date:8/5/2009

X-RAY MACHINES MAY SPREAD INFECTIONS IN THE ICU

Poor infection control practices when using x-ray machines may lead to nosocomial infections in the ICU. In a new study, Israeli researchers observed 173, 113, and 120 ICU chest x-rays during observation, intervention, and follow-up periods, respectively. Adequate infection control was practiced during 1 percent of observation x-rays, 42 percent of intervention x-rays, and 10 percent of follow-up x-rays. The study also showed that x-ray machine surface cultures yielded resistant gram-negative bacteria on 39 percent, 0 percent, and 50 percent of the observation, intervention, and follow-up x-rays. The authors conclude that improved infection control practices could decrease the occurrence of resistant organisms on x-ray equipment. This study is published in the August issue of CHEST, the peer-reviewed journal of the American College of Chest Physicians.


AFRICAN-AMERICANS WITH COPD USE FEWER HEALTH SERVICES

New research shows that African-Americans (AA) with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) use fewer health services than Caucasians with the condition. Researchers from the University of Maryland compared health services utilization and cost outcomes in 4,723 AA patients and 4,021 Caucasians with COPD, asthma, or both. After controlling for age, gender, cohort allocation, and comorbidities, results showed that AA adults with COPD, asthma, or coexisting asthma and COPD used fewer medical services and accounted for lower medical costs than Caucasians. The authors speculate that the differences in utilization and medical costs may provide an explanation for the racial disparities in outcomes of patients with COPD and asthma. The article is published in the August issue of CHEST, the peer-reviewed journal of the American College of Chest Physicians.


NEW REVIEW DEBATES NEED FOR ADDITIONAL LABA SAFETY TRIALS

In a new commentary, Malcolm R. Sears, MD, of McMaster University in Hamilton, ON, Canada, discusses the familiar debate about the safety of using long-acting β2-agonists (LABA) in monotherapy for asthma. The commentary focuses on data provided in the metaanalysis recently undertaken by the FDA of safety outcomes of 60,954 individuals in 110 LABA trials. Results of the analysis found that LABA used with mandatory inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) was not associated with an increased risk of asthma-related mortality, intubations, or exacerbations. Dr. Sears argues that an additional analysis beyond the FDA study is not practical or needed. In addition, he suggests that the use of LABA, when indicated, in mandatory combination with appropriate doses of ICS, should remain the standard treatment for patients with moderate to severe asthma. This article is published in the August issue of CHEST, the peer-reviewed journal of the American College of Chest Physicians.


'/>"/>

Contact: Jennifer Stawarz
jstawarz@chestnet.org
847-498-8306
American College of Chest Physicians
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Highlights of Economic and Business Growth in the Tampa Bay Region (News Briefs)
2. News briefs from the July issue of CHEST
3. News briefs from the June issue of CHEST
4. Journal Chest: April news briefs
5. Highlights of Economic and Business Growth in the Tampa Bay Region (News Briefs)
6. Journal Chest: March news briefs
7. Preparing for the Next Disaster: Dialysis Community Briefs Hill About Emergency Response
8. Journal Chest: January news briefs
9. News briefs from the American Society of Plastic Surgery
10. Chest Journal: August news briefs
11. News briefs from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/24/2017)... Diego, California (PRWEB) , ... May 24, 2017 ... ... care through innovative medical image management and interpretation, has received U.S. Food and ... , Nucleus.io is a web-based, scalable and secure cloud platform for medical ...
(Date:5/24/2017)... ... May 24, 2017 , ... Dr. Manju R. Kejriwal, a leading ... orthodontics, with or without a referral. Dr. Kejriwal understands the emotional and financial toll ... braces in Cincinnati, OH. Patients no longer need to feel the esthetic effects of ...
(Date:5/24/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... May 24, 2017 , ... ... for Global Policy Solutions is vehemently opposed to Donald Trump’s budget, “A New ... for despair that inspires fear, demonizes the poor, marginalizes underserved populations, undermines productivity, ...
(Date:5/24/2017)... ... May 24, 2017 , ... Dr. Curry Leavitt, ... HP3 (High-Performance Periodontal Practice) continuing education (CE) series. As a compassionate and dedicated ... field by attending numerous CE courses each year. His recent course, Course II ...
(Date:5/24/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... May 24, 2017 , ... Medic ... Kids: The Surprising Truth about Pediatric Septic Shock” hosted by the Journal of Emergency ... at 2 p.m. Eastern time, will be presented by Captain Rommie Duckworth, LP, a ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/4/2017)... CAESAREA, Israel , May 4, 2017  DarioHealth ... with mobile health and big data solutions, today announced ... an A&D Company, and STI Technologies Limited to lower ... effective immediately. Through STI,s innoviCares card, which is available ... , DarioHealth customers will be eligible for additional ...
(Date:5/3/2017)... 2017 A Catheterization Laboratory is an ... facility. Commonly referred to as cath lab, this ... imaging technology to give physicians visual access to ... spaces, a team of physicians perform life-saving procedures ... intervention, congenital heart defect closure, stenotic heart valves, ...
(Date:5/3/2017)... 3, 2017  West Pharmaceutical Services, Inc. (NYSE: ... injectable drug administration, announced today that Fran ... Services, and Diane Paskiet , Director, Scientific ... focused on West,s expertise in the areas of ... as providing commentary on updated industry guidance. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: