Navigation Links
New technology using florescent proteins tracks cancer cells circulating in the blood
Date:5/8/2014

After cancer spreads, finding and destroying malignant cells that circulate in the body is usually critical to patient survival. Now, researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Chemistry & Biology have developed a new method that allows investigators to label and track single tumor cells circulating in the blood. This advance could help investigators develop a better understanding of cancer spread and how to stop it.

Cancer spread, or metastasis, leads to up to 90% of cancer deaths. Investigators currently do not have the clinical capability to intervene and stop the dissemination of tumor cells through metastasis because many steps of this process remain unclear. It is known that cancer cells undergo multiple steps, including invasion into nearby normal tissue, movement into the lymphatic system or the bloodstream, circulation to other parts of the body, invasion of new tissues, and growth at distant locations. Now, a new approach developed by Dr. Ekaterina Galanzha of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in Little Rock and her colleagues allows for labeling and tracking of individual circulating cancer cells throughout the body, thereby helping researchers elucidate the pathways of single cells from start to finish.

The advance uses photoswitchable fluorescent proteins that change their color in response to light. When the first laser of light hits the circulating tumor cells, they appear to be fluorescent green. A second laser, using a different wavelength, makes the cells appear to be fluorescent red. To label individual cells, researchers use a very thin violet laser beam aimed at small blood vessels.

The fluorescence from each cell is collected, detected, and reproduced on a computer monitor as real-time signal traces, allowing the investigators to count and track individual cells in the bloodstream

"This technology allows for the labeling of just one circulating pathological cell among billions of other normal blood cells by ultrafast changing color of photosensitive proteins inside the cell in response to laser light," explains Dr. Galanzha.

In tumor-bearing mice, the researchers could monitor the real-time dynamics of circulating cancer cells released from a primary tumor. They could also image the various final destinations of individual circulating cells and observe how these cells travel through circulation and colonize healthy tissue, existing sites of metastasis, or the site of the primary tumor. "Therefore, the approach may give oncologists knowledge on how to intervene and stop circulating cancer cell dissemination that might prevent the development of metastasis," she says.

The approach might also prove useful for other areas of medicinefor example, tracking bacteria during infections or immune-related cells during the development of autoimmune disease.


'/>"/>

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. Tufts University licenses silk biomaterials technology to Akeso Biomedical
2. Microfluidic technology reveals potential biomarker for early pancreatic cancer
3. Airport security-style technology could help doctors decide on stroke treatment
4. Bio-Rads Droplet Digital PCR technology highlighted at the 2014 AACR Annual Meeting
5. New technology from CWRU links patient records between hospitals, medical flight crews
6. New advance in 3-D printing and tissue engineering technology
7. Pitts Center for Medical Innovation announces pilot funding for biomedical technology
8. Beaumont Health System first outside of Japan to test new atrial fibrillation technology
9. CONRAD wins USAID Science and Technology Pioneers Prize for development of first vaginal gel proven to reduce HIV
10. Global collaboration forms to advance Japanese TB vaccine technology
11. Schizophrenia in the limelight: Film-industry technology provides insights
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
New technology using florescent proteins tracks cancer cells circulating in the blood
(Date:12/7/2016)... ... , ... “Tomorrow Trump Goes To Washington”: a brief but engaging illustration ... to America. “Tomorrow Trump Goes To Washington” is the creation of published author, Nancy ... country. , Nancy attributes her patriotic nature to her WWII veteran father. She ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... ... (PRWEB) December 07, 2016 , ... Angioma Alliance ... cerebral cavernous angiomas, was awarded a grant from the Julian Grace Foundation to ... Mexico has more people with cavernous angioma than anywhere in the world. Most ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... ... , ... NuevaCare, a leading home care agency based in San Mateo but ... as part of its ambitious website relaunch. As Bay Area clients scramble to find ... serving their city. The new site has several key city-specific pages to address this ...
(Date:12/6/2016)... ... 06, 2016 , ... The International Vaccine Institute (IVI) and ... the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV). The collaboration will accelerate MERS-CoV vaccine ... deployment in the event of a future outbreak. , IVI and GeneOne held ...
(Date:12/6/2016)... ... December 06, 2016 , ... According to a November ... such as consuming too many mints or not drinking enough water, which can cause ... California Dental Care notes that good oral hygiene not only helps reduce the possibility ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/6/2016)... , Dec. 6, 2016 Eurofins ... accreditation from the College of American Pathologists (CAP) ... (CLIA) for its new laboratory in ... moved its North American headquarters. "Our ... sequencing -- which is still considered the ,Gold ...
(Date:12/6/2016)... -- With opioids commonly used for pain management for workplace injuries, ... has led to nationwide fatalities. The synthetic opioid called ... heroin or morphine, resulting in likelihood of addiction, abuse or death. ... , , ... Behavioral Health for HMC HealthWorks, explained the opioid drug is less ...
(Date:12/6/2016)... new study released today by the Alliance for ... Drug Pricing Program will continue to expand at an unprecedented ... exceed $23 billion in total purchases at the 340B price. ... Part B drug reimbursement purchases over the next five years. ... of data on total drug purchases through 340B from 2005 ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: