Navigation Links
New technique catalogs lymphoma-linked genetic variations
Date:12/27/2012

As anyone familiar with the X-Men knows, mutants can be either very good or very bad or somewhere in between. The same appears true within cancer cells, which may harbor hundreds of mutations that set them apart from other cells in the body; the scientific challenge has been to figure out which mutations are culprits and which are innocent bystanders. Now, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine have devised a novel approach to sorting them out: they generated random mutations in a gene associated with lymphoma, tested the proteins produced by the genes to see how they performed, and generated a catalog of mutants with cancer-causing potential.

"Our goal was to correlate various mutations with potential to promote lymphoma," says Joel Pomerantz, Ph.D., an associate professor in the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine's Institute for Cell Engineering. For the study, to be reported in a January 2013 issue of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Pomerantz and his research team focused on the protein CARD11. CARD11 plays a key role in signaling the presence of infection, which leads infection-fighting white blood cells to grow and divide. Certain mutations can turn CARD11 permanently "on," causing out-of-control cell division that results in cancers called lymphomas, which strike about 75,000 Americans each year.

To find out which genetic mutations would increase CARD11's activity, Pomerantz and his team made copies of the CARD11 gene in a way that made random mutations likely. They then used the faulty copies to make mutant proteins, and tested the ability of those proteins to trigger the signaling reaction that is CARD11's specialty. This let the researchers figure out which mutations increased the protein's activity, and by how much information that can be compared to emerging data about CARD11 mutations found in human lymphomas. "We found that several of the overactive mutations we'd identified have already been found in patients," Pomerantz says.

Noting that CARD11 is part of the NF-κB signaling pathway, a target of some cancer therapies, Pomerantz says the new cataloging technique could lead to more personalized treatment. "We imagine eventually being able to correlate response to a particular therapy with a particular mutation," he says. For now, Pomerantz and his team are delving deeper into what gives the bad CARD11 mutants their special powers, looking for mechanisms to explain how certain changes increase the protein's activity.


'/>"/>

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. New MRI technique may predict progress of dementias
2. Detecting malaria early to save lives: New optical technique promises rapid and accurate diagnosis
3. New technique may help severely damaged nerves regrow and restore function
4. New Techniques May Improve Infant Heart Surgery
5. New surgical technique for removing inoperable tumors of the abdomen
6. New technique predictably generates complex, wavy shapes
7. Screening for breast cancer without X-rays: Lasers and sound merge in promising diagnostic technique
8. A marker in the lining of the lungs could be useful diagnostic technique for lung cancer screening
9. New technique could reduce number of animals needed to test chemical safety
10. Technique spots disease using immune cell DNA
11. Noninvasive imaging technique may help kids with heart transplants
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/2/2016)... ... 02, 2016 , ... The National Resident Matching Program® (NRMP®) ... (“the Match”), the system through which U.S. and international medical school students and ... were placed in the 2016 Match, and 29,572 were filled when the matching ...
(Date:5/2/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... May 02, 2016 , ... Dr. Philip ... his patients with same day treatments. In the past, many necessary dental treatments could ... work, along with multiple anesthetic shots and extra chair time. Not only could this ...
(Date:5/2/2016)... ... May 02, 2016 , ... East Los Angeles dentist , ... can visit Dr. Assili to receive any dental extraction treatment for $40 off the ... June 30, 2016. With the lower price, patients can more easily afford extractions to ...
(Date:5/2/2016)... ... , ... This week Omega Institute, a premier nonprofit educational retreat center in ... Omega is offering a record 370 in-person workshops and new online learning opportunities ... interest in or need for the knowledge and skills we’ve been cultivating for nearly ...
(Date:5/2/2016)... ... May 02, 2016 , ... ... new Specialty Pharmacy Patient Satisfaction Award that will recognize specialty pharmacies for their ... from Zitter Health Insights’ Specialty Pharmacy Patient Satisfaction Survey compiled throughout 2016. Results ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/2/2016)... , May 2, 2016  While nearly three-quarters of ... can have on their health, only about half report ... to the results of a new survey announced today ... the start of National Osteoporosis Month, Hologic is raising ... affects nearly 56 million Americans. Osteoporosis is ...
(Date:5/2/2016)... SAN FRANCISCO , May 2, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ...  is expected to reach USD 11.1 billion by ... Grand View Research, Inc. Major drivers of the ... in therapeutic areas and government recommendations for periodic ...      (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20150105/723757 ) ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... , April 29, 2016 ... Review, H1 2016" market research report that provides ... with comparative analysis at various stages, therapeutics assessment ... of administration (RoA) and molecule type, along with ... It also reviews key players involved in the ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: