Navigation Links
New study finds continued abstinence is key to increased survival from alcohol-related liver disease
Date:4/20/2009

However, the downside is that up a quarter of people with alcohol-related cirrhosis die before they get the chance to stop drinking. Alcohol-related cirrhosis develops silently but usually presents with an episode of internal bleeding or jaundice - which is often fatal.

The study, led by Dr Nick Sheron, senior lecturer at the University of Southampton and consultant hepatologist at Southampton General Hospital, found that abstinence from alcohol is the key factor in long-term prognosis, even with relatively severe alcohol-related cirrhosis of the liver.

The study appears in this month's Addiction journal. The aim was to determine the effect of pathological severity of cirrhosis on survival in patients with alcohol-related cirrhosis.

Liver biopsies from 100 patients were scored for the Laennec score of severity of cirrhosis between 1 January 1995 and 31 December 2000, and medical notes were reviewed to determine various clinical factors including drinking status.

Using up-to-date mortality data from the National Health Service Strategic Tracing Service, Dr Sheron found that drinking status was the most important factor determining long-term survival in alcohol-related cirrhosis of the liver.

He found that the degree of cirrhosis on biopsy had less impact on survival. Abstinence from alcohol at one month after diagnosis of cirrhosis was the more important factor determining survival with a seven year survival of 72 per cent for the abstinent patients against 44 per cent for the patients continuing to drink.

Dr Sheron, who has just been appointed as one of two internal advisors to the new Commons Health Select Committee on Alcohol, comments: "These findings illustrate the critical significance of stopping alcohol intake, in alcohol-related cirrhosis but unfortunately the services needed to help these patients stay alcohol free simply do not exist in many parts of the UK.

"This study clearly confirms the common sense knowledge amongst hepatologists that the single most important determinant of long-term prognosis in alcohol-induced cirrhosis is for the patient to stop drinking.

"At the most simplistic level the successful management of alcohol-induced liver disease comprises two components; firstly to keep the patient alive long enough for them to stop drinking and secondly to maximise their chances of continued abstinence. A third and vital objective at a public health level is to prevent people developing alcohol-related cirrhosis in the first place. If we are to reduce liver mortality it would seem important to encourage and support patients to stop drinking, and to address the public health aspects of alcohol-related liver disease."


'/>"/>

Contact: Molly Jarvis
molly@addictionjournal.org
44-207-848-0014
Wiley-Blackwell
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Penn study finds pro-death proteins required to regulate healthy immune function
2. New study shows promise in reducing surgical risks associated with surgical bleeding
3. Study, meta-analysis examine factors associated with death from heatstroke
4. Study suggests loss of 2 types of neurons -- not just 1 -- triggers Parkinsons symptoms
5. Study says COPD testing is not measuring up
6. Preclinical study suggests organ-transplant drug may aid in lupus fight
7. Ability to cope with stress can increase good cholesterol in older white men, study finds
8. High alcohol consumption increases stroke risk, Tulane study says
9. Mailman School of Public Health study examines link between racial discrimination and substance use
10. Pitt study finds inequality in tobacco advertising
11. Stanford study highlights cost-effective method of lowering heart disease risks
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/27/2016)... ... May 27, 2016 , ... With a ... medical and food industries. Aside from its GMP accreditation, Validation Center is also ... successfully certified products, services and staff. , Validation Center is ISO17025 accredited and ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... ... There are many ways to cook a hot dog, but new research ... their dogs straight off the grill. Of the 90 percent of Americans who say ... a hot dog, far outpacing other cooking methods such as steaming (12 percent), microwaving ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... California (PRWEB) , ... May 26, 2016 , ... ... associated with discovery of thousands of defective respirators, according to court documents and ... the case of William and Becky Tyler v. American Optical Corporation, Case No. ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... May 26, 2016 , ... Georgia State University College of ... programs. , Answering to the increasing demand for curricular specializations, the Certificate in ... environmental and land use law. ,  , “The demand for lawyers with specific ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... ... On Memorial Day, Hope For Heroes and USA Medical Card ... the country. The nonprofit Hope For Heroes partnered with the leading provider of ... disabled military veterans, as well as police, firemen, and EMS professionals across the country, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/25/2016)... Inivata, a global clinical ... tumour DNA (ctDNA) analysis to improve personalised healthcare ... Clive Morris as Chief Medical Officer. ... development programme, scientific collaborations, and through to commercialisation ... in clinical outcomes for patients. Clive ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... --   , Study met ... cleansing and superiority in , Excellent ... of the ascending colon   , ... Norgine B.V. today announced new positive data from the phase III ... versus standard 2 litre PEG with ascorbate. The study met both ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... , May 24, 2016  Joe Marziani has joined VMS BioMarketing as senior ... executive officer, today. In his new role, Marziani will lead the company,s business development ... professionals to improve outcomes. Photo - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160523/371089 ... ... ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: