Navigation Links
New study explains how organs coordinate their development with the whole body
Date:6/20/2014

This news release is available in Portuguese.

This news release is available in Portuguese.

A research group led by Christen Mirth at Instituto Gulbenkian de Cincia (Portugal) uncovered that the development of wings in fruit flies does not progress synchronously with the organism's development. Instead, it is coordinated with the whole body only at distinct 'milestones'. This study, published in the latest issue of the scientific journal PLOS Genetics*, helps explain how an organism facing environmental and physiological perturbations retains the ability to build correct functional organs and tissues in a proportional adult body.

For a growing organism it is essential to have robust developmental processes ensuring that the developing organs and tissues are formed correctly even in the face of environmental or physiological perturbations. To achieve robustness, the processes that generate individual organs must, at some level, be integrated across the whole body to ensure that a correctly patterned and proportioned adult is produced at the end of development. Christen Mirth and colleagues proposed to study how organ and whole-body development is coordinated, using the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, as a model organism. The juvenile period in the fruit fly comprises three larval moults, followed by a wandering stage where larvae leave the food and search for a site to begin metamorphosis at a stage called pupariation. The research team focused on these so-called developmental events to study how the development of wings is coordinated with the whole body of the fruit fly larvae.

The researchers first analysed the expression of six genes involved in the development of wings in normal conditions of growth, i.e. at a temperature of 25C, and generated a detailed staging scheme. Next, the researchers changed the temperature to affect the growth conditions of the larvae and analyzed the rate of wing development compared to the whole-body development. It is known that flies grow faster at higher temperatures and grow slower at lower temperatures. However, the researchers observed that the development of the wings was slower at 29C, compared to flies growing in normal conditions or flies growing at 18C. "This result surprised us, as we could clearly observe a delay in the development of these wings in wandering stage larvae, but their progression accelerated towards the stage of pupariation. This means that development shows variability in its progression, but converges at the milestone of pupariation", explains Marisa Oliveira, first author of this study.

Next, researchers modified the larval physiology by interfering with the hormone ecdysone that regulates the different developmental events in the larvae, such as wandering and pupariation. Similar to the temperature manipulations, when they altered the timing of ecdysone synthesis, they found that the wings developed slowly at first, but accelerated their development to achieve coordination at the stage of pupariation.

These results support the hypothesis proposed by this research team, that the development of the wings, in the fruit fly, is aligned with the whole-body development at two milestones: moulting and pupariation.

Marisa Oliveira concludes: "With this work we propose a new paradigm for thinking about organ-organ and organ-body coordination during development. We suggest that organisms achieve this coordination not by continuous but rather by discrete communication focused on developmental milestones".

Christen Mirth adds: "The next challenge is to understand the nature of this communication at milestones."


'/>"/>

Contact: Ana Mena
anamena@igc.gulbenkian.pt
351-214-407-959
Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Study Suggests Vaccine May Help Kids With Brain Cancer
2. Study reveals how cancer drug causes diabetic-like state
3. Coffee Drinking in Pregnancy Wont Lead to Sleepless Baby: Study
4. Lower GI problems plague many with rheumatoid arthritis, Mayo Clinic study finds
5. Veggies Like Broccoli, Cabbage May Help Fight Breast Cancer: Study
6. No Added Cancer Risk From Hip Replacement Materials: Study
7. Reported Decline in U.S. Pneumonia Deaths May Be False: Study
8. Early Study Finds Some Promise for Lung Cancer Vaccine
9. Narcissists Often Ace Job Interviews, Study Finds
10. Sexual objectification of female artists in music videos exists regardless of race, MU study finds
11. Soy may alleviate hot flashes in menopause, large-scale study finds
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... Dr. ... from injury. Recently, he has implemented orthobiologic procedures as a method for treating ... one of the first doctors to perform the treatment. Orthobiologics are substances that ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Those who have experienced traumatic events may suffer ... unhealthy avenues, such as drug or alcohol abuse, as a coping mechanism. To avoid ... healthy coping following a traumatic event. , Trauma sufferers tend to feel a range ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... ... Global law firm Greenberg Traurig, P.A. announced that 20 Florida attorneys are ... for this recognition are considered among the top 2 percent of lawyers practicing within ... of this year’s Legal Elite Hall of Fame: Miami Shareholders Mark D. Bloom, ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... People across the U.S. are sharpening their ... Award, an essay contest in which patients and their families pay tribute to a ... the 2016 National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) Annual Education Conference (AEC) this September. ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Strategic ... Frederick area economy by obtaining investment capital for emerging technology companies. SCP ... that have already resulted in more than a million dollars of capital investment ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... 2016 Research and Markets has announced ... Forecast to 2022" report to their offering. ... the patients with kidney failure, it replaces the function of ... patient,s blood and thus the treatment helps to keep the ... balance. Increasing number of ESRD patients & ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... June 23, 2016 Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; ... for its Elecsys BRAHMS PCT (procalcitonin) assay as a ... septic shock. With this clearance, Roche is the first ... integrated solution for sepsis risk assessment and management. ... infection and PCT levels in blood can aid clinicians ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... Bracket , a leading clinical trial technology ... outcomes platform, Bracket eCOA (SM) 6.0, at the 52 ... 30, 2016 in Philadelphia , Pennsylvania.  A ... product of its kind to fully integrate with RTSM, will ... 6.0 is a flexible platform for electronic clinical outcomes assessments ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: