Navigation Links
New research suggests hearts are experts at self-preservation
Date:9/30/2007

Bristol researchers have identified a heart protection mechanism in mice that surgeons and cardiologists may be able to exploit to improve treatments for patients in future.

The research, published in the October issue of the American journal Critical Care Medicine, was funded by the British Heart Foundation and conducted by Saadeh Suleiman, Professor of Cardiac Physiology at the University of Bristol, and his colleagues at the Bristol Heart Institute. It describes surprising responses of the heart to mock cardiac surgery in a mouse model. When the heart was stopped and restarted - mimicking the conditions used in most heart bypass surgery - scientists found that hearts with coronary disease from genetically modified mice were more resistant to damage than hearts without coronary disease.

In the study the researchers have introduced a model of coronary artery disease and heart attack by feeding the genetically modified mice (apoE-/-) a high-fat diet typical of people's diets in North America and the UK. Apo E-/- mice fed a normal rodent diet for the same period do not develop coronary disease. The genetic modification in apoE-/- involves changing cholesterol processing, making the mouse prone to fatty build-up in the coronary arteries, similar to human heart disease.

In apoE-/- mice, coronary disease seemed to have 'preconditioned' the hearts; they had developed an innate protection against further damage.

This confirms a widely held belief that in certain patients who have survived a heart attack, the heart may become naturally preconditioned against further damage, and that when treating patients with coronary disease, surgeons and cardiologists have an advantage that can be further exploited to protect the heart. The team at the Bristol Heart Institute, based in the Bristol Royal Infirmary, is currently using this model to investigate the basis of this internal protective phenomenon in order to formulate strategies to protect hearts with coronary disease.

An exciting observation was also made when normal mice were fed the same Western-type high-fat diet. These mice do not develop coronary disease and their hearts appear to function normally. However, when hearts from these mice were starved of blood supply such as in a heart attack or during surgery - they were found to be much more vulnerable to injury than hearts of similar mice fed normal diet. This is in complete contrast to the disease-prone animals and suggests that Western style high-fat diet can significantly weaken the internal defences of the otherwise normally working heart and render it vulnerable to any sudden stress. Therefore the Western-style diet is truly ugly for disease prone hearts and it is also bad for healthy hearts.

Professor Suleiman, said: "We have shown that in mice prone to developing coronary artery disease, a Western-style diet accelerates the progression of disease but that hearts with coronary disease then became more resistant to further damage, such as occurs during surgery. But it is still better to avoid surgery altogether by adopting healthy eating habits!"


'/>"/>

Contact: Joanne Fryer
joanne.fryer@bristol.ac.uk
44-117-331-7276
University of Bristol
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Kidney Stones - Interesting New Research implicates bacteria as its cause
2. Stem cell research- now Nobel Laureates join the debate
3. Researchers urge caution in using ear tube surgery
4. Paracetamol May Cause Live Damage Warns Consumer Education and Research Centre
5. Spouses and other partners lower blood pressure says new research
6. Researchers Scale to assess the Severity of Epilepsy in Kids
7. More Research Required For COPD
8. Researchers identify the early makers of Neonatal Sepsis
9. OHSU Researchers Announce New Discovery
10. Skin Cancer Research To Go Global
11. Researchers Identify Gene Connected To Bipolar Disorder
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:9/25/2017)... ... 2017 , ... “The Majestic Unicorn”: a poignant book that describes what ... the creation of published author, Dayna Chantel, an artist and a writer. , Chantel ... march aboard the cypress ark-vessel. Male and female, no matter what species, they were ...
(Date:9/25/2017)... ... , ... The trend-spotters, tastemakers, and healthy lifestyle product experts at the ... drinks, with the new NEXTY Gold Award at the Natural Products Expo East trade ... which is reserved for just those companies that hit high marks on the criteria ...
(Date:9/25/2017)... Church, VA (PRWEB) , ... September 25, 2017 ... ... Handling and Response Preconference Workshop, **Presented by FDAnews**, Nov. 1-3, 2017 – Bethesda, ... the drugmaker passed with flying colors. And then, on the tenth inspection it ...
(Date:9/25/2017)... CA (PRWEB) , ... September 25, 2017 , ... ... music video on Thursday, September 28, 2017 to deliver a powerful message of ... On film Franchise. , Feature film writer/director Robert Adetuyi (Beat the World, Stomp ...
(Date:9/24/2017)... ... September 25, 2017 , ... Andrea Purcell, NMD, had an epiphany one evening. Four months ... her dinner plate. She thought pregnancy was so hard. She wondered why no one talks ... than her. In that moment, she decided to write what she wished her friends and ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/18/2017)... KALAMAZOO, Mich. , Sept. 18, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... and OptiMed Specialty Pharmacy of Kalamazoo, Mich. ... a strategic hub service that expedites and streamlines patient ... spirometer, Spiro PD 2.0, and wellness management services.  ... a medical device used to measure lung function for ...
(Date:9/12/2017)... NEW YORK , Sept. 12, 2017   EcoVadis ... global supply chains, has published the first annual edition of its Global ... more than 20,400 companies evaluated by EcoVadis, based on Scorecard Ratings that ... ... Risk & Performance Index ...
(Date:9/9/2017)... Sept. 8, 2017 ... MRI Unit coming to Washington DC ... When: Tuesday, September 12 th – Monday, September 18 th ... offering free MRI brain scans to the public.Where:  ... parked at 501 K Street NW, Washington, D.C.What:BTF brings its nationwide initiative, ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: