Navigation Links
New research review shows that your family doctor may be the key to quitting smoking
Date:11/26/2007

Scientists at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) are defining the most effective ways to treat tobacco dependence, and in an article released in the November issue of the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ) they highlight the surprisingly significant role that the health practitioner can play in helping people quit smoking. Many people's attempts to quit are unsuccessful, so effective interventions are critical for the 4.5 million smokers in Canada alone.

"Advising patients to quit, even just once, helps to double quit rates," write CAMH researchers Dr. Bernard Le Foll and Dr. Tony George. Their article Treatment of tobacco dependence: integrating recent progress into practice is a comprehensive summary of tobacco use, causes of nicotine dependence, and advances in treatment and intervention."To initiate as many cessation attempts as possible, practitioners should advise all of their patients who smoke to quit."

Research shows that since an estimated 70% of smokers visit a physician each year, family doctors have a substantial opportunity to influence smoking behaviour. "Even a short intervention (three minutes or less) can increase a person's motivation to quit and can significantly increase abstinence rates," the authors write. They provide an algorithm topped by the simple question "Are you smoking"" to help physicians integrate a patient's smoking status and his or her readiness to quit, taking a comprehensive approach that combines assessment, behavioural interventions and pharmacologic treatment of tobacco dependence.

The article also showed that smokers with moderate to severe tobacco dependence have been found to respond best to three types of pharmacotherapy -- nicotine replacement therapy, bupropion and varenicline -- but there is no clear threshold that can help clinicians decide whether a particular patient will benefit from a particular pharmacotherapy, and there is no consensus on which one should be used first. The authors' provide physicians with a clear comparative table of these three first-line pharmacologic treatments, as well as advice on whether to combine these pharmotherapies, or to consider nortriptyline and clonidine as second-line medications.

Epidemiologic studies have indicated that the majority of successful attempts to quit smoking occur without direct medical assistance or without pharmacotherapy. "The use of nonpharmacologic methods (such as counseling) should be encouraged, especially for people for whom medication use is problematic," say the authors. "The goal is to motivate the patient to try to quit smoking." Moreover, pharmacological interventions are clearly effective and allow doctors to double or triple the odds of success.


'/>"/>

Contact: Michael Torres
michael_torres@camh.net
416-595-6015
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Stanford researchers find culprit in aging muscles that heal poorly
2. Children of depressed moms do better when dad is involved, SLU researcher finds
3. UCLA researchers identify markers that may predict diabetes in still-healthy people
4. Mayo Clinic researchers discover new diagnostic test for detecting infection in prosthetic joints
5. New research shows how chronic stress worsens neurodegenerative disease course
6. New research explores newborn in-hospital weight loss
7. Research may unlock mystery of autisms origin in the brain
8. Bipolar disorder relapses halved by Melbourne researchers
9. HIVs impact in Zimbabwe explored in new research
10. U.S. Research Funding Continues to Flatten as U.S. Health Costs Climb - in August 31 Science
11. Cell that triggers symptoms in allergy attacks can also limit damage, Stanford researchers find
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/26/2017)... ... , ... “THE FLINTHILLS FAMILY-Our Journey to the Cross”: the personal journey of Bob Massey and ... creation of published authors, Bob and Margaret Massey. Bob Massey is small in stature ... and leather tough." His love for others is apparent in all of his life ...
(Date:5/24/2017)... ... May 24, 2017 , ... Last ... Mary Ellen, hospital employees, and town officials to celebrate the grand opening of ... developed by Rendina as part of its ongoing relationship with RWJBarnabas Health, New ...
(Date:5/24/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... May 24, 2017 , ... ... dental implants in Bayside, NY, who have now spent 10 years as clinical ... New York University (NYU) College of Dentistry. Through the program, private practitioners receive ...
(Date:5/24/2017)... ... May 24, 2017 , ... Dr. Curry Leavitt, a ... (High-Performance Periodontal Practice) continuing education (CE) series. As a compassionate and dedicated clinician, ... by attending numerous CE courses each year. His recent course, Course II of ...
(Date:5/24/2017)... ... May 24, 2017 , ... ... pediatric dentistry options for its patients on Long Island, New York. , ... well being, and is one of the biggest trends in dentistry today. ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/10/2017)... BURNIE, Md. , May 10, 2017 ... retention solutions for the clinical research industry, is proud ... www.CSSiEnroll.com . The new website features both enriched ... overall user experience and enhances the company,s already well-established ... the industry. "After many months of ...
(Date:5/9/2017)... JERUSALEM , May 9, 2017  Oramed ... www.oramed.com ), a clinical-stage pharmaceutical company focused on ... today that the Canadian Intellectual Property Office has ... for Oral Administration of Exenatide". The patent covers ... analog. GLP-1 is an incretin hormone ...
(Date:5/8/2017)...  Diplomat Pharmacy, Inc. (NYSE: DPLO)., has completed its ... health care service center company based in ... relationship management programs for leading pharmaceutical manufacturers and health ... WRB will join Envoy Health Management, LLC , ... biotech firms, and other service companies. Together, WRB and ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: