Navigation Links
New report highlights need for action on health in the aftermath of war
Date:12/31/2011

Countries recovering from war are at risk of being left to their own devices in tackling non communicable diseases, leaving an "open door" for exploitation by alcohol, tobacco and food companies, health experts warn.

Writing in the Bulletin of the World Health Organization, Bayard Roberts and Martin McKee, of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, and Preeti Patel, of King's College London, argue that the post-conflict environment risks increases of mental health problems and other NCDs, such as high blood pressure, diabetes and cancer.

After exposure to violent and traumatic events, people may be prone to developing harmful health behaviours, such as excessive drinking and smoking, which exacerbate the problem of NCDs in the long-term. This is why the lack of a strong will from the authorities to restore the health system leaves an open door for commercial ventures to influence health policy to their advantage.

The authors write: "This toxic combination of stress, harmful health behaviours and aggressive marketing by multinational companies in transitional settings requires an effective policy response but often the state has limited capacity to do this."

Afghanistan has no national policy or strategy towards NCDs and, apart from the European Commission, none of its partners has given priority to introduce and support them. High blood pressure is largely untreated in Iraq, three times as many people die prematurely from NCDs in Libya than from infectious diseases and similar patterns can be found in other countries recovering from conflict.

"This policy vacuum provides an open door for multinational companies to influence policies in ways that undermine efforts to control tobacco and alcohol use or improve unhealthy diets in transitional countries," the experts say.

Little attention is paid in reconstruction and humanitarian efforts to helping countries emerging from conflict deal with their present or future burden of NCDs with the topic virtually ignored during the United Nations high-level meeting on NCDs in September 2011. The authors argue that this gap must be filled, pointing out that the post-conflict period can provide an opportunity to completely rewrite strategies and undertake reforms to better address the health needs of a population and lay the foundations for a more efficient health system.

Dr Roberts, a lecturer in the European Centre on Health of Societies in Transition at LSHTM, says: "While great attention is rightly paid to infectious diseases, noncommunicable diseases should also be given attention especially as the post-conflict environment can provide the perfect breeding ground for unhealthy activities like smoking, drinking and poor diet. We are making the argument that if the authorities do not step up to lead the way in developing policies which will benefit public health, then they leave the route clear for companies to step in and serve their own interests."
'/>"/>

Contact: Paula Fentiman
paula.fentiman@lshtm.ac.uk
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Uterine Fibroids Cost Billions in U.S. Health Care, Lost Work: Report
2. Vitamin D Helps Bone Health Only With Calcium: Report
3. Poor Lifestyles Harming U.S. Heart Health: Report
4. Presidents Bioethics Commission releases report on human subjects protection
5. Electronic Cigarette Makers Must Prove Safety of Products: Report
6. New report identifies research needed on modified risk tobacco products
7. Worlds Tiniest Preemies Growing Up Healthy: Report
8. Chimpanzees in research: IOM report release Dec. 15
9. American Society of Clinical Oncology issues annual report on progress against cancer
10. New life-saving diagnostic test for HIV patients featured in Better World Report
11. Mistaken identity: New report highlights the global impact of medical misdiagnosis
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/19/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... January 19, 2017 , ... ... acoustic and privacy panel system. , The Tranquility privacy panel system was ... collaborative office environment. Tranquility panels help reduce noise and provide the visual privacy ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... , ... January 19, 2017 , ... Sam & Associates ... to commercial and residential clients in the California Bay Area, is launching a charity ... in the region. , Heart disease is the primary killer of adult men and ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... ... 19, 2017 , ... For the third year running, Noto ... the surrounding area, is inaugurating a charity event to help raise funds ... Lou Gehrig's disease or motor neurone disease, is a deadly neurological disorder that ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... ... January 19, 2017 , ... Creative messages ... Real Impact contest from Impact Teen Drivers and California Casualty. Entries from students ... , Educational grants totaling $15,000 will be awarded for the best peer-to-peer messages ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... San Diego, CA (PRWEB) , ... January 19, 2017 , ... ... for their 2017 collaboration with the American Heart Association; “Howe” Healthy is Your ... how to stay healthy and active. Each year, Bill Howe Plumbing, Heating & Air ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/19/2017)... , January 18, 2017 , , Marks E-QURE ... rd distribution agreement, following similar agreements in ... Wound care is $2 5 ... E-QURE Corp. (OTCQB: EQUR), a leader in medical devices for the ... Tech - Médica Equipos Médicos S.A.S. (TeckMedica) in Colombia ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... Jan. 18, 2017  Magnetic Insight Inc., leader ... into an agreement with inviCRO LLC to develop ... imaging system based on inviCRO,s VivoQuant™ visualization and ... as a complete MPI solution package with the ... or cell imaging in vivo. MPI ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... 2017 The Academy of Managed Care ... (FDA) for its release today of draft guidance ... makers can proactively share clinical and economic information ... emerging therapies awaiting FDA approval. ... AMCP developed during two multi-stakeholder meetings last year ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: