Navigation Links
New induced stem cells may unmask cancer at earliest stage
Date:2/3/2011

MADISON - By coaxing healthy and diseased human bone marrow to become embryonic-like stem cells, a team of Wisconsin scientists has laid the groundwork for observing the onset of the blood cancer leukemia in the laboratory dish.

"This is the first successful reprogramming of blood cells obtained from a patient with leukemia," says University of Wisconsin-Madison stem cell researcher Igor Slukvin, who directed a study aimed at generating all-purpose stem cells from bone marrow and umbilical cord blood. "We were able to turn the diseased cells back into pluripotent stem cells. This is important because it provides a new model for the study of cancer cells."

The research was reported today (Feb. 4) in the journal Blood by Slukvin and colleagues from the WiCell Research Institute and the Morgridge Institute for Research, private research centers in Madison.

Slukvin's group, using banked healthy and diseased bone marrow and cord blood, employed a technique developed in 2009 by Wisconsin stem cell pioneer James Thomson that sidesteps the problems posed by the genes and viral vectors used to induce mature cells to regress to a stem cell state.

According to the new study, which was funded by the National Institutes of Health and The Charlotte Geyer Foundation, reprogramming blood cells to become induced stem cells is many times more efficient than the reprogramming of skin cells, which were the first mature cells to be guided back to an embryonic stem cell-like state.

The new work could open to science vast repositories of banked tissue, both healthy and diseased, such as bone marrow, the soft tissue in bones that helps make blood, and umbilical cord blood. The work could underpin insightful models capable of unmasking the cellular events that go awry and cause cancers such as leukemia, and could aid the development of new stem cell-based therapies, according to Slukvin.

Of particular note in the new study, says Slukvin, is the reprogramming of marrow cells from a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia, a cancer of the blood that kills about 1,500 people a year in the United States. The disease, like all leukemias, starts in the cells that produce white blood cells in bone marrow.

According to Slukvin, the induced stem cells generated from the diseased tissue retain the exact same complex of genetic abnormalities found in the mature cancer cells. That means that when the induced cells are turned back into blood, scientists could, in theory, watch cancer develop from scratch as cells bearing cancer mutations become cancer stem cells.

"When we differentiate induced stem cells back to blood, we can identify the stages when the abnormality that leads to cancer manifests itself," Slukvin explains.

The ability to pinpoint the very earliest stages of cancer is a major focus of biomedical science.

"This is very important for developing new leukemia drugs," says Slukvin. "A major focus of leukemia research is to find ways to try and eliminate the most immature leukemia cells - cancer stem cells."

The work by Slukvin and his team may represent the first step in a new understanding of the cascade of events that results in blood diseases such as leukemia.

Employing the reprogramming technique developed by Thomson and his colleagues, Slukvin emphasizes, is important because it eliminates the exotic reprogramming genes, some of which are cancer-related genes, from the induced stem cell equation. In the case of chronic myeloid leukemia and other blood diseases, obtaining stem cells that do not have the genetic reprogramming factors is very important.

"When you use viruses (to ferry genes into a cell) you have chromosomal integration," the Wisconsin researcher notes. "Some of the reprogramming factors are oncogenes and would interfere with a study of chronic myeloid leukemia" whose abnormalities are also encoded on the chromosome.


'/>"/>

Contact: Igor Slukvin
islukvin@wisc.edu
608-263-0058
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. iSAEC and HMORN to use electronic medical records to research genetics of drug-induced SAEs
2. Johns Hopkins researchers develop safer way to make induced pluripotent stem cells
3. Which comes first: Exercise-induced asthma or obesity?
4. Haptoglobin as an early serum biomarker of virus-induced type 1 diabetes in rats
5. Sun-induced skin cancer: new discovery permits doctors to assess genetic risk
6. Millions Are Losing Their Hearing Unnecessarily; Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Is Always Preventable, Says HearUSA Audiologist
7. Trauma-induced changes to genes may lead to PTSD
8. Combination antibiotics effective against chlamydia-induced arthritis
9. Octreotide acetate does not prevent treatment-induced diarrhea in anorectal cancer
10. Free Seminars to Help Employers Prevent Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Among Workers Set for Phoenix, Reno, Salt Lake City, Denver in May
11. Treatment of portal hypertensive pulmonary lesions induced by schistosomiasis
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/26/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... May 26, 2016 , ... W.S. ... products, has been honored with a 2016 When Work Works Award for its use ... part of the national When Work Works project administered by the Families and Work ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... , ... On Memorial Day, Hope For Heroes and USA Medical ... for the country. The nonprofit Hope For Heroes partnered with the leading provider ... for disabled military veterans, as well as police, firemen, and EMS professionals across the ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... May 26, 2016 , ... Catalent ... for drugs, biologics, consumer health and global clinical supply services, today announced two ... support the company’s continued investment and strategic growth plans in the Asia Pacific ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... Indianapolis, Indiana (PRWEB) , ... May 26, 2016 ... ... national provider of healthcare supply chain solutions, today announced the organization has earned ... management meets international standards and is compliant with all rules and policies associated ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... NY (PRWEB) , ... May 26, 2016 , ... ... founder of Mehling Orthopedics and chief medical officer of Blue Horizon International (BHI), ... and Regeneration. The conference was held during May 5-6, 2016 in Chicago, IL, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/25/2016)... May 25, 2016 Inivata, ... precision of circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) analysis to ... appointment of Professor Clive Morris as ... across the clinical development programme, scientific collaborations, and ... deliver significant improvements in clinical outcomes for patients. ...
(Date:5/24/2016)...   , Study met ... and superiority in , Excellent plus ... of the ascending colon   , ... B.V. today announced new positive data from the phase III MORA ... standard 2 litre PEG with ascorbate. The study met both primary ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... VMS BioMarketing as senior vice president of sales, announced Andrea Heslin Smiley , ... the company,s business development and sales team, exploring new opportunities for VMS to empower ... ... ... ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: