Navigation Links
New gene variants raise risk of neuroblastoma, influence tumor progression
Date:9/4/2012

Researchers have discovered two gene variants that raise the risk of the pediatric cancer neuroblastoma. Using automated technology to perform genome-wide association studies on DNA from thousands of subjects, the study broadens understanding of how gene changes may make a child susceptible to this early childhood cancer, as well as causing a tumor to progress.

"We discovered common variants in the HACE1 and LIN28B genes that increase the risk of developing neuroblastoma. For LIN28B, these variants also appear to contribute to the tumor's progression once it forms," said first author Sharon J. Diskin, Ph.D., a pediatric cancer researcher at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. "HACE1 and LIN28B are both known cancer-related genes, but this is the first study to link them to neuroblastoma."

Diskin and colleagues, including senior author John M. Maris, M.D., director of the Center for Childhood Cancer Research at Children's Hospital, published the study online Sept. 2 in Nature Genetics.

Striking the peripheral nervous system, neuroblastoma usually appears as a solid tumor in the chest or abdomen. It accounts for 7 percent of all childhood cancers, and 10 to 15 percent of all childhood cancer deaths.

The study team performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS), comparing DNA from 2,800 neuroblastoma patients with that of nearly 7,500 healthy children. They found two common gene variants associated with neuroblastoma, both in the 6q16 region of chromosome 6. One variant is within the HACE1 gene, the other in the LIN28B gene. They exert opposite effects: HACE1 functions as a tumor suppressor gene, hindering cancer, while LIN28B is an oncogene, driving cancer development.

The current study showed that low expression of HACE1, a tumor suppressor gene, and high expression of LIN28B, an oncogene, correlated with worse patient survival. To further investigate the gene's role, the researchers used genetic tools to decrease LIN28B's activity, and showed that this inhibited the growth of neuroblastoma cells in culture.

The new research builds on previous GWAS work by Children's Hospital investigators implicating other common gene variants as neuroblastoma oncogenes. As in the current study, these gene variants show a double-barreled effect, both initiating cancer and provoking its progression.

"In addition to broadening our understanding of the heritable component of neuroblastoma susceptibility, we think this research may suggest new therapies," Diskin added. "Our follow-up studies will focus on how we may intervene on these genes' biological pathways to develop more effective treatments."


'/>"/>

Contact: John Ascenzi
ascenzi@email.chop.edu
267-426-6055
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Genetic variants, tobacco exposure and lung cancer risk
2. Depo-Provera Birth Control Might Raise Breast Cancer Risk
3. Cancer Diagnosis May Raise Odds for Suicide, Heart Attack Death
4. Infection Might Raise Blood Clot Risk for Older Adults: Study
5. Feeling Trapped, Obligated Raises Odds of Job Burnout: Study
6. Spouses of Cancer Patients May Have Raised Risk of Heart Disease, Stroke
7. Disrupted Sleep May Raise Risk for Obesity, Diabetes: Study
8. Childhood Obesity May Raise Odds of Adult Liver Cancer
9. Wartime Killing May Raise Veterans Thoughts of Suicide
10. Stopping Blood Thinners Raises Stroke Risk for Patients With Irregular Heartbeat
11. Presence of fetal cells in women lowers risk of breast cancer but raises risk of colon cancer
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:10/13/2017)... , ... October 13, 2017 , ... Global Healthcare Management’s ... Alexandria Park in Milford, NJ. This free event, sponsored by Global Healthcare Management’s ... The fun run is geared towards children of all ages; it is a ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... “America On The Brink”: the Christian ... On The Brink” is the creation of published author, William Nowers. Captain Nowers ... a WWII veteran, he spent thirty years in the Navy. Following his career ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... IsoComforter, Inc. ( https://isocomforter.com ), ... of an innovative new design of the shoulder pad. The shoulder pad provides ... while controlling your pain while using cold therapy. By utilizing ice and water that ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... , ... October 12, 2017 , ... HMP , ... recipient of a 2017 Folio Magazine Eddie Digital Award for ‘Best B-to-B Healthcare Website.’ ... on October 11, 2017. , The annual award competition recognizes editorial and design excellence ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... of $3,296 in property taxes a year. In some states—like New York, New ... , By contrast, many overseas retirement havens have extremely low property-tax rates, which ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/25/2017)... , Sept. 25, 2017   Montrium , ... File solutions, today—from the IQPC Trial Master Files ... , NL)—announced that EastHORN Clinical Services has selected ... programs and TMF management. EastHORN, a leading European ... platform to increase transparency to enable greater collaboration ...
(Date:9/19/2017)... venture-backed medical device company developing a non-invasive, robotically assisted, platform therapy that uses pulsed sound ... ... Jim Bertolina, PhD ... Tom Tefft ... device executive Josh Stopek , PhD, who has led R&D and business development teams ...
(Date:9/12/2017)... , Sept. 12, 2017   EcoVadis , the leading platform ... published the first annual edition of its Global CSR Risk and Performance ... evaluated by EcoVadis, based on Scorecard Ratings that analyzed nearly 800,000 data ... ... ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: