Navigation Links
New explanation for cardiac arrest
Date:4/19/2010

Researchers have discovered a new disorder linked to heart problems that stems from a genetic defect in the protein glycogenin. In a worst case scenario, disruption of this protein's function can lead to cardiac arrest, which is exactly what happened to the young man whose case triggered the investigation at Sahlgrenska University Hospital at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, that led to a brand new diagnosis.

Published today in the revered New England Journal of Medicine, the study details how a young man suffered a cardiac arrest but survived thanks to the work of the ambulance paramedics. An investigation at Sahlgrenska University Hospital led to the discovery of not only a new disorder but also how a defect in the protein glycogenin can lead to an energy crisis in the muscle cells.

This protein's job is to initiate the build-up of glycogen that constitutes the muscle cells' carbohydrate reserves. The glycogenin starts the actual process by building up a short chain of around ten sugar molecules, which can then be turned into glycogen with the help of other enzymes. During strong muscular work the sugar molecules in the glycogen are used to create energy.

"The disorder is characterised by an inability to form the initial chain of sugar molecules," says Anders Oldfors, who headed up the research team and is a professor at the Sahlgrenska Academy and consultant at Sahlgrenska University Hospital. "This leads to a shortage of glycogen and an energy crisis in the muscle cells that can result in cardiac arrest."

The study also reveals how muscle cells that have a severe congenital defect can adjust and find other ways of sourcing energy, though it may not be sufficient in all situations.

"We're hoping that our continued research in the field will provide answers to how the change in the glycogenin causes an inability to start accumulating carbohydrates in the muscle cells," says Oldfors.

Clinically, the discovery means that this disorder must be considered as a diagnosis when investigating heart problems. For patients, a correct diagnosis means that there is preventative treatment available, though no cure is on the horizon at present. As the cause of the disorder is a genetic defect, it is hoped that in the future patients can be given a customised treatment, or gene therapy, for it.

"But we don't yet know how common this disorder is," says Oldfors. "This is something that the future will hold now that we are in a position to make the correct diagnosis."


'/>"/>

Contact: Anders Oldfors
anders.oldfors@gu.se
46-313-422-084
University of Gothenburg
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. King Tuts Demise Gets New Explanation
2. His or hers jealousy? Study offers new explanation for sex differences in jealousy
3. Study Finds Possible Explanation for the Link Between Infertility and Breast/Ovarian Cancer Risks
4. "Zerona" Lipo-Laser Penetrates Wellness Industry for Anti-aging, Weight Loss, Body Sculpting and Cardiac Health
5. The creative engagement and cardiac health connection disclosed
6. Study from CWRU Nursing School finds a year after cardiac event only 37 percent still exercising
7. Minnesota State High School League and Take Heart Minnesota Team Up to Save More Lives From Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA)
8. As girth grows, risk of sudden cardiac death shrinks
9. Top 10 Pharmaceutical Company Awards Comprehensive Cardiac Safety Study to iCardiac
10. Doctors Turning to Cardiac Catheterization Too Quickly
11. Cardiac Science Sets Date for Fourth Quarter, Year-End Results Release and Conference Call
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:12/10/2016)... ... December 10, 2016 , ... ... Santa are all sources of external stimuli that can put a great deal ... pressure to spread holiday cheer through gifts, food and festive gatherings can lead ...
(Date:12/9/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... December 09, 2016 , ... ... counseling and aural rehabilitation—provided by audiologists—to remain a critical part of public access ... and Drug Administration (FDA) announced this week that, starting immediately, it ...
(Date:12/9/2016)... ... December 09, 2016 , ... The Justin Veatch Fund ... (NCADD) is recommending the film Whispering Spirits and its discussion guide ... Columbia as an education tool in the war against teen drug abuse. NCADD ...
(Date:12/9/2016)... ... 09, 2016 , ... MEDI+SIGN®, a provider of fully-automated patient ... solution for Emergency Departments (ED) has been added to their portfolio. Housed in ... rooms, and with a simplified pallet of information available to the patient, the ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... ... December 08, 2016 , ... After enjoying record-breaking attendance at ... for its 33rd Annual Issues & Research Conference, March 2-3, 2017, at ... the conference is “Persistent Challenges and New Opportunities: Using Research to Accelerate the ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/8/2016)... , Dec. 8, 2016 KEY FINDINGS ... the largest share of the market in 2016 and ... dominance can be attributed to a large number of ... (US hold the largest share in the patient temperature ... benefits such as reducing loss of blood during surgeries, ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... Dec. 8, 2016 Allergy Diagnostics Market: ... and tests that are used to determine the ... milk, or drugs etc. in the samples by ... immune system. The report on global allergy diagnostics ... the market. The report consists of an executive ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Endodontic ... ... analyzes the worldwide markets for Endodontic Supplies in US$ Thousand. The report provides ... Japan , Europe , Asia-Pacific , ... estimates and forecasts are provided for the period 2015 through 2022. Also, a ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: