Navigation Links
New drug active against most aggressive type of lung cancer cells
Date:7/10/2014

Manchester scientists have shown that a new drug could prove useful in treating small cell lung cancer - the most aggressive form of lung cancer.

Scientists from the Cancer Research UK Manchester Institute, based at The University of Manchester and part of the Manchester Cancer Research Centre, teamed up with experts at AstraZeneca, as part of a collaboration agreed in 2010, to test a drug known as AZD3965 - on small cell lung cancer cells.

The research, published in the journal Clinical Cancer Research, also helps identify which patients are most likely to respond to the treatment.

One treatment approach currently being investigated by cancer scientists is finding drugs that exploit the change in energy production in tumours. In cancer cells there is a switch to using glycolysis, a process that requires less oxygen and produces lactate as a by-product. Certain molecules monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) are involved in the movement of lactate out of cells and drugs that target MCTs have been shown to stop tumour growth.

The Manchester researchers tested a new drug that targets one of these molecules, MCT1, in lung cancer cells and in mouse models.

Professor Caroline Dive, who led the research, said: "Small cell lung cancer has a dismal prognosis and we have seen little improvement in treatment for many years. More targeted therapies are needed to help those patients whose tumours become resistant to chemotherapy. This new drug AZD3965 is currently in clinical trials, but it has not yet been tested in small cell lung cancer."

The team investigated the sensitivity of small cell lung cancer cells to AZD3965 and showed that in those cells lacking an alternate lactate transporter, MCT4, the drug had an effect. They found that the drug increased the level of lactate in cells and, more importantly, reduced tumour growth.

They then looked at tumour samples taken from lung cancer patients and found that high levels of MCT1 were linked to worse patient prognosis.

Professor Dive added: "We propose that this drug will be most useful in this subset of patients who have elevated MCT1 levels and need more effective treatments.

"Our laboratory results are promising and certainly provide encouragement to test this treatment clinically in patients with small cell lung cancer."

Susan Galbraith, head of the oncology innovative medicines unit at AstraZeneca, said: "Lung cancer is still the leading cancer killer, and we are working on a number of potential treatment options that could provide patients with a better chance of beating the disease. Targeting tumour cell metabolism represents a novel and exciting approach, and we are delighted to be working with The University of Manchester and Cancer Research UK to investigate the utility of AZD 3965 as a potential novel cancer treatment."


'/>"/>

Contact: Alison Barbuti
alison.barbuti@manchester.ac.uk
44-016-127-58383
University of Manchester
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Most prostate cancer specialists dont recommend active surveillance for low-risk patients
2. Keeping active pays off even in your 70s and 80s
3. A new Kabuto-like nickel catalyst forms bioactive frameworks from phenol derivatives
4. Screen of existing drugs finds compounds active against MERS coronavirus
5. Faster dental treatment with new photoactive molecule
6. Resin infiltration effects in a caries-active environment -- 2 year results
7. Beaumont holds first international congress on underactive bladder
8. Beauty & bacteria: Slim, attractive men have less nasal bacteria than heavy men
9. Attractive professional cyclists are faster
10. PhUSE Working Group Active in Developing Standard Analysis Scripts
11. Rehabilitation Robots, Active Prostheses, and Exoskeletons: Market Shares, Strategies, and Forecasts, Worldwide, 2014 to 2020 New Report Available at ReportsnReports.com
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:12/2/2016)... ... December 02, 2016 , ... ... launch of its 60-day free trial program for all of the company’s desktop ... offer a truly hassle free experience. , FlexiSpot’s unique desktop risers use an ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... ... December 02, 2016 , ... ... two ostomy patients, standing as living proof that attitude and determination can combine ... and issues that spike around the holidays. This campaign will offer patients a ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... Hawaii (PRWEB) , ... December 02, 2016 , ... ... 2016 at the Hyatt Regency Waikiki Beach Resort and Spa in Honolulu, offering ... in the field of pain management. , The demand for supplemental training ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... ... December 02, 2016 , ... "Pro3rd Accents Volume 2 is ... create versatile lower third titles with just a few clicks of the mouse," said ... includes 30 lower third animations. Choose from various styles with accented animations, rigid boxes, ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... ... 02, 2016 , ... ‘Tis the season for giving! Today, 20 creative teams ... Family Partnership and the Drug Enforcement Administration as part of the National Red Ribbon ... winning schools who decorated their campuses with this year’s Red Ribbon Week theme: “YOLO. ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/2/2016)... Columbia , December 2, 2016 bioLytical Laboratories, ... INSTI HIV-Selbsttest, bei den Mitgliedern des Apothekenbundes von Kenia eingeführt. ... ... INSTI HIV Self Test! (PRNewsFoto/bioLytical Laboratories) ...      (Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20161201/444905 ) ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... BEIJING , Dec. 2, 2016 ... ("Lianluo Smart" or "the Company") which develops, markets ... products in China and ... Cardiovascular Disease Diagnosis and Treatment New Progress Forum, ... Guangdong Province , Guangdong Provincial ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... Research and Markets has announced the addition of Jain ... and Companies" to their offering. ... , , Drug ... market value of drug delivery technologies and the anticancer drugs are ... to organs involved and the types of cancer as well as ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: