Navigation Links
New devices to boost nematode research on neurons and drugs
Date:2/6/2008

A pair of new thin, transparent devices, constructed with soft lithography, should boost research in which nematodes are studied to explore brain-behavior connections and to screen new pharmaceuticals for potential treatment of parasitic infections in humans, report 10 scientists at three institutions.

The tools -- an artificial soil device and a waveform sampler device, both of which can be held easily in a human hand -- are detailed in a paper appearing online ahead of regular publication by the Journal of Neurophysiology.

The devices take advantage of a microfluidic fabrication technique, which allows for the presence of channels, chambers or ports, for gas permeability and transparency and for using fluids to deliver stimuli with precision. The major improvement over previous tools is that these new ones are agarose-free, using micron-scale channels and pillars that mimic real soil particles.

The newly reported devices provide a near natural environment for soil-dwelling roundworms (Caenorhabditis elegans, or C. elegans) that measure barely a millimeter in length. The nematodes move normally, but slightly compressed so that highly sensitive microscopes can be used to monitor individual fluorescent-injected neurons in real time during experiments.

"There is a commonality between these devices that is really going to help us understand how the nervous system works," said lead researcher Shawn Lockery, a professor of biology and member of the Institute of Neuroscience at the University of Oregon.

"The artificial soil device consists of a hexagonal array of microscopic pillars sandwiched between a glass cover slip and a bulk material from which the pillars protrude," Lockery said. "The worm wanders around in a one-centimeter square area as a river of mostly water flows through it. We can change the solution the nematode is exposed to in ways that are relevant to the research that is being conducted."

For instance, researchers can manipulate the levels of sodium chloride and oxygen in the water being injected into the devices.

As a proof of principle, researchers had to show that the behavior of the nematodes is essentially normal in the new devices, meaning that the worms crawl like they do on an agar surface. "But nematodes don't live on exposed agar surfaces in real life," Lockery said. Instead, they are found within soil and easily collected in the wild in rotting fruit.

"The beauty of this system is that it reproduces standard laboratory behavior, but it does so in a context that is probably more normal in terms of the worms' real-life environment," he said. "You get forward and reverse locomotion, and the nematodes also do the omega turn, in which a worm's head bends around to touch the tail during forward locomotion, forming a shape like the Greek omega."

The waveform device features 18 different channels, with each divided into domains with unique amplitudes and wavelengths to manipulate how a nematode moves. Instead of using posts to mimic real soil, depressions or channels provide natural areas -- even some that don't occur in nature -- for the nematodes to crawl through. "This ability to change the channels but still allow the worms to move about proved the principle in this case," Lockery said. "What we found from this is that these animals are remarkably adaptable to a wide range of situations."

The artificial soil device, Lockery said, will help to study how brains generally process sensory information and for high-through-put screening of new drugs for their biological effects. Such research, he said, could lead to new treatments for some two billion people infected annually by parasitic nematodes, as well as new tools to reduce nematode-caused losses in world agriculture.

The waveform device could enhance research on brain-behavior connections. C-elegans have only 302 neurons, compared to 100 billion neurons in the human brain, Lockery said. At least 50 percent of the proteins in the nematode brain are identical to those in human brains. "C. elegans is the only animal for which we have a complete anatomical reconstruction of the nervous system -- a complete wiring diagram of the brain. This greatly accelerates analyses of brain function in this organism," he said.


'/>"/>

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. Integrated Laser Therapies Launches, Offers Low-power, Therapeutic Laser Devices and Training for Therapists and Consumers
2. GPS Devices Measure Severity of Peripheral Artery Disease
3. QED International Associates Announces Changes to the HealthShares(TM) European Medical Products and Devices Index
4. Hiemstra Approved to Manufacture Medical Devices in New CER
5. SYMLIN Pen-Injector Devices Now Available
6. Advertisements for Medical Devices, Implants Should Carry Warnings of Dangerous Side Effects, Infections
7. Radiology Support Devices Introduces New Breathing Phantom System
8. SPO Medical Unveils New Oximetry Devices for European Markets
9. Hazardous Advanced Micro Devices (A.M.D.) Clean Room Chemicals Caused Multiple Birth Defects, Lawsuit Alleges
10. DeviceSpace Career Fair Opens Doors for Hundreds of Medical Device and Diagnostics Career Candidates
11. QED International Associates Announces Changes to the HealthShares(TM) Composite, HealthShares(TM) Cardio Devices, and the HealthShares(TM) Orthopedic Repair Indexes
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
New devices to boost nematode research on neurons and drugs
(Date:2/19/2017)... ... February 19, 2017 , ... ... home healthcare, will join forces with Healthwise ® at HIMSS 2017 ... the industry leader in evidence-based health education, technology and services, will demonstrate a ...
(Date:2/18/2017)... , ... February 17, 2017 , ... ... drvallecillos.com , Beverly Hills plastic surgeon Dr. Glenn Vallecillos ... , Dr. Vallecillos says, "Traditionally, plastic surgery has been centered around that idea ...
(Date:2/17/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Smiles by Seese is a comprehensive family dental practice ... leads the practice as a skilled and highly credentialed dentist who is qualified to ... patients of all ages with excellence in general, restorative, and cosmetic dentistry . ...
(Date:2/17/2017)... ... 2017 , ... For the first time, International Scholarship and ... floor for the 2017 HIMSS Conference & Exhibition at the Orange ... than 40,000 healthcare industry professionals are expected at the conference, where they will ...
(Date:2/17/2017)... , ... February 17, 2017 , ... ... has been named a finalist in the 8th Annual DecisionHealth Platinum Awards in ... delivery system. Qualis Health’s work is recognized across multiple award categories, highlighting four ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/20/2017)... 2017 Acute, Chronic and Prophylaxis GVHD ... a CAGR of 7% from 2016-2021 and CAGR of 3% from 2021-2027. ... 2016 to 2027. The market is estimated at $0.36bn in 2016, $0.51bn ... ... how you can exploit the future business opportunities emerging in this sector. ...
(Date:2/19/2017)... , Feb. 19, 2017  nThrive™, an ... cycle portfolio and thought leadership at the 2017 ... a category leader award from KLAS. ... discussion focused on how market trends shape the ... particularly a sophisticated, comprehensive Patient Access solution. The ...
(Date:2/19/2017)... ORLANDO, Fla. , Feb. 18, 2017 ... that positive Phase 1 clinical data for Nektar,s lead ... (RCC) were presented at ASCO GU 2017.  NKTR-214 is ... T cells and Natural Killer (NK) cell abundance directly ... on these immune cells.  The results were presented by ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: