Navigation Links
New advances in lipid genetics lead to better detection and prevention of major diseases
Date:5/29/2011

Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Studying the genetic make-up of different varieties of lipids (fatty molecules) in the blood plasma of an individual can lead to a better and earlier prediction of diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, and heart disease, two researchers will tell the annual conference of the European Society of Human Genetics today (Monday 30 May). In the first study, Dr. Joanne Curran from the Texas Biomedical Research Institute, San Antonio, USA, will tell the conference that lipidomic profiling will become a more reliable early indicator of individuals likely to develop diabetes than the more commonly used predictors such as blood glucose and insulin levels.

Dr. Curran and colleagues from the US and Australia measured 356 different lipid varieties from about 1100 Mexican American members of large extended families who were part of the San Antonio Family Heart Study. The Mexican American population is at high risk of diabetes with about 25% of this population ultimately becoming diabetic. At the start of the research, 861 of the individuals studied did not have diabetes. However, over the 10 year follow-up examined in the study, 110 individuals did develop the disease.

The scientists were able to isolate 128 different varieties of lipids that predicted the progression to diabetes by measuring the the lipidomic profiles of each individual at multiple timepoints during the follow-up period. "The single best predictor we found was a novel component called dihydroceramide (dhCer). This was substantially increased in people with diabetes. It is also heritable, and appears to be an independent risk factor unconnected to blood sugar and insulin levels," says Dr. Curran.

After uncovering the link between dhCer and diabetes, the team searched the genome to find locations that harboured genes that influence dhCer levels. They identified a region on chromosome 3 that appeared to contain a gene with substantial importance for the production of dhCer. "Through whole genome sequencing, we are now attempting to identify this causal gene in the hope that it will be informative in the understanding of the pathogenesis of diabetes, and also suggest new avenues for treatment," Dr. Curran says.

In the future, the researchers say, measurement of dhCer levels could become routine in the prediction of individuals likely to become diabetic. One of the difficulties of the current predictive methods is that they do not function until a patient is near to developing the disease. Being able to identify those at risk at the earliest stage would mean that individuals have plenty of time to make the lifestyle changes that could help them avoid the disease through a change in diet, or increasing physical activity, for example.

"Currently one in ten US adults suffers from diabetes and recently the Centers for Disease Control has predicted that this will increase to one in three by 2050", says Dr. Curran. "We are optimistic that our discovery will lead to new treatments, but in the short-term the importance of finding out at an early stage whether any individual is likely to develop it cannot be overstated. A test based on dhCer levels will help to avoid the serious health effects that diabetes has in its own right, such as kidney failure, amputations, and blindness. It is, of course, also a risk for cardiovascular disease, so the health burden of this condition is enormous", she concludes.

In the second study, Dr. Sara Willems, from the Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands, will describe to the conference research carried out on the influence of common genetic lipid variants on atherosclerosis and related heart disease. "A recent genome-wide meta-analysis of more than 100,000 individuals identified a large number of genetic variants associated with levels of LDL (bad) cholesterol, HDL (good) cholesterol and triglycerides. These molecules are, at increased levels of LDL and triglycerides and decreased levels of HDL, important risk factors for cardiovascular disease", says Dr. Willems.

The researchers used risk scores from these genetic variants to test the hypothesis that their cumulative effects were associated with cardiovascular disease. For this purpose they used genetic data from more than 8000 individuals from the population-based Rotterdam Study and more than 2000 individuals participating in the Dutch family-based Erasmus Rucphen Family study.

They found an association between the LDL risk score and arterial wall thickness, and a strong association of this risk score with carotid plaque. These conditions can cause arterial blockage which leads to stroke. The same risk score was also associated with coronary heart disease.

"Our findings show that an accumulation of common genetic variants with small effects on lipid levels can have a significant effect on clinical and sub-clinical outcomes", says Dr. Aaron Isaacs, who led the project. "In the future, as our knowledge of genetic variation increases, effective pre-clinical genetic screening tools may be able to enhance the prediction and prevention of diseases such as cardiovascular disease."

New genetic variants influencing lipid levels are being identified all the time, the researchers say. "As new variants are discovered, we would like to be able to continue to test them, both singly and combined, for association with cardiovascular disease. The cost of these diseases to individuals, families, society and healthcare systems is immense", says Dr. Willems.

"Cardiovascular disease is the main cause of death in Europe, killing over 4 million people per year. It also represents 23% of the total disease burden (illness and death) across the continent. Managing cholesterol levels is important for prevention. This can be done early in life by effective treatment. We hope that our study, showing that common genetic variants play an important role in the occurrence of cardiovascular disease, marks a starting point for early prediction and prevention and may thus reduce the burden of disease," she concludes.


'/>"/>

Contact: Mary Rice
mary.rice@riceconseil.eu
European Society of Human Genetics
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Led by advances in chemical synthesis, scientists find natural product shows pain-killing properties
2. Society of Interventional Radiology addresses radiation safety, advances best practices
3. Experts to discuss advances in dental sleep medicine treatments for sleep-disordered breathing
4. UT Southwestern research advances fight against kidney cancer
5. Research presented at 2011 GU Cancers Symposium highlights advances in treatment of prostate cancer
6. RIC study suggests researchers are entering a new era of advances in brain research
7. Long-shot discovery may lead to advances in treating anxiety, memory disorders
8. Roundup: 2010 Advances in Heart Disease and Stroke Care
9. Ovarian cancer advances when genes are silenced
10. Blood Cancer Advances May Improve Survival
11. ASHs 52nd Annual Meeting and Exposition showcases the latest advances in the field
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:12/10/2016)... ... December 10, 2016 , ... Denver-based humanitarian aid organization, Saving ... and toddlers. , The situation in Syria continues to worsen—deadly weapon explosions are ... dying from disease. The situation is intensifying with winter coming and airstrikes increasing. ...
(Date:12/9/2016)... Cincinnati, Ohio (PRWEB) , ... December 09, 2016 ... ... production of miniature, folded, pharmaceutical inserts and outserts. As a means of ... This addition will enable Flottman to individually code professional inserts (PIs) and ...
(Date:12/9/2016)... ... December 09, 2016 , ... Mediaplanet today announces distribution of ... while encouraging readers to sign up as an organ donor for the 123,000 people ... , An organ donor can save up to 8 saves through organ donation and ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... ... December 08, 2016 , ... ... Insights beginning January 1, 2017. The name change aligns the entire company ... and improving health care quality. , “We are very proud of the achievements ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... Pa. (PRWEB) , ... December 08, 2016 , ... ... Medicine Southern Chester County, a Property owned by an affiliate of Seavest, has ... square foot Penn Medicine Southern Chester County ambulatory care center (ACC) was named ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/8/2016)... 8, 2016 Global Interventional Radiology Market: ... global interventional radiology market analyzes the current and ... an elaborate executive summary, including a market snapshot ... sub-segments. The research is a combination of ... bulk of our research efforts along with information ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... KEY FINDINGS North America ... market in 2016 and is expected to continue in ... a large number of surgical procedures that are taking ... in the patient temperature management market.) Patient warming and ... of blood during surgeries, lowering the risks of neurological ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... Dec. 8, 2016 Allergy Diagnostics Market: ... and tests that are used to determine the ... milk, or drugs etc. in the samples by ... immune system. The report on global allergy diagnostics ... the market. The report consists of an executive ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: