Navigation Links
New Treatment Options for Seasonal Affective Disorder, from Harvard Mental Health Letter
Date:11/6/2008

Bright white light therapy has been used to treat seasonal affective disorder (SAD) for more than 20 years. Although it remains a mainstay of treatment, in the past few years researchers have investigated ways to improve and refine light therapy, reports the November 2008 issue of the Harvard Mental Health Letter.

Boston, MA (PRWEB) November 6, 2008 -- Bright white light therapy has been used to treat seasonal affective disorder (SAD) for more than 20 years. Although it remains a mainstay of treatment, in the past few years researchers have investigated ways to improve and refine light therapy, reports the November 2008 issue of the Harvard Mental Health Letter.

Improvements are necessary for three reasons. First, light therapy doesn't work for everyone. Studies have reported that 50% to 80% of patients achieve complete relief and that remission may depend upon carefully individualized timing of light exposure. Second, dosing remains a major question. The recommendation for 30 minutes of daily exposure to 10,000 lux is based on average response to white light. Finally, side effects, while mild for many patients, may be more of a concern for others.

Dr. Michael Miller, editor in chief of the Harvard Mental Health Letter, notes that investigations are now under way to see if changing the timing or type of light therapy might improve response or reduce side effects. Some areas of study:

Better timing. Researchers reported that remission from SAD was twice as likely if light therapy was precisely calibrated to melatonin rhythms--which may vary by several hours from one individual to the next.

Dawn simulation. In this variation, a preset light device turns on before a patient awakens. Light intensity increases gradually over a period of 90 minutes. Although studies so far have been small, they have also been promising.

Blue light. Studies have found that cells in the retina are particularly sensitive to blue light, suggesting that this wavelength may powerfully affect circadian rhythms. Researchers are investigating whether blue light might provide the same benefit as white light but with less exposure time.

For a supplementary video, go online to www.health.harvard.edu/137.

Also in this issue:

  • Treating "first-episode" schizophrenia
  • Positive emotions to resolve disputes
  • The undecided voter

The Harvard Mental Health Letter is available from Harvard Health Publications, the publishing division of Harvard Medical School, for $24 per year. Subscribe at www.health.harvard.edu/mental or by calling 877-649-9457 (toll-free).

Media: Contact Raquel Schott at Raquel_Schott @ hms.harvard.edu for a complimentary copy of the newsletter, or to receive our press releases directly.

Harvard Health Publications
Contact: Raquel Schott
Raquel_Schott @ hms.harvard.edu
617-432-5781

# # #

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/Seasonal-Affective/Disorder/prweb1580694.htm


'/>"/>
Source: PRWeb
Copyright©2008 Vocus, Inc.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. New treatment effective in counteracting cocaine-induced symptoms
2. New treatment boosts muscle function in myasthenia gravis
3. Broad-based group of physicians calls for improvement in stroke treatment
4. Cranberry Could Juice Up Ovarian Cancer Treatment
5. Non-medicinal treatment touted for pre-schoolers with ADHD
6. Nonmedicinal treatment touted for preschoolers with ADHD
7. U of M study: Early treatment can reverse heart damage
8. Biologic treatment for rheumatoid arthritis and the risk of cancer
9. New Treatment Explored for Cluster Headaches
10. Thailand: Partners Open Free AIDS Treatment Clinic in Renowned AIDS Temple in Lop Buri
11. 4-Star Gen. Barry Mccaffrey, Former U.S. Drug Czar, to Keynote Recovery Happens! Rally for Treatment: Wed., Sept. 5, 11 Am, State Capitol West Steps, Sacramento
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/20/2017)... ... , ... Source Vitál Apothecary, a skin and body care company dedicated to ... had a successful visit to the 2017 ECRM Diet, Vitamin & Sports Nutrition Conference ... the nutritional, sports and health industries a chance to meet in private sessions with ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... ... January 20, 2017 , ... ... enhance people’s everyday lives, recently attended the January ECRM Trade Show in Hilton ... is known for its large range of supplements that keep the body functioning ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... ... January 20, 2017 , ... ... sugar-free alternative VW+ 002. The drinks have been produced in collaboration with Zlatan ... perform during your workout. , After a successful launch in Sweden last year, ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... ... January 20, 2017 , ... “I Forgive You”: a fine examination of how God handles ... the creation of published author, Stephen Miller, who, for over ten long years has been ... him. Born in Trinidad and Tobago, he has been serving the Lord for over twenty ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... ... ... is God’s Lighthouse”: a moving and colorful collection of prayers that reminds readers ... author, Gene Gaapf, a retired truck driver, and a long-time writer, whose published works ... school and have many different titles,” Gaapf mentions about his different works. “I am ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/19/2017)... ALEXANDRIA, Va. , Jan. 18, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... commends the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for ... biopharmaceutical companies and population health decision makers can ... FDA approved products as well as emerging therapies ... guidance largely mirrors consensus recommendations that AMCP developed ...
(Date:1/18/2017)... -- Aprima Medical Software, a leading provider of innovative ... revenue cycle management (RCM) solutions for medical practices, ... Healthcare Data Solutions (HDS) of Coral Cables, FL. ... full support for HDS,s customers, which include approximately ... states. Financial terms were not disclosed. ...
(Date:1/18/2017)... , Jan. 18, 2017 The Philadelphia Pediatric ... companies developing medical devices for children. The Consortium ... receive seed grants of $50,000 each. The devices ... weak nerve signals, a hand-operated rapid blood delivery system for ... in babies. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: