Navigation Links
New Tool Aims to Predict Problems in Preemies

THURSDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- A newly developed assessment tool may give doctors and parents a heads-up about the kinds of medical problems that may face premature infants, researchers say.

The PhysiScore allows doctors to use a computational method to create a score based on factors such as a baby's pulse rate and breathing rate during the first three hours after birth. In a new study, researchers said they were able to use the electronic scoring system to predict with a 91 percent to 98 percent degree of accuracy whether an infant would have serious medical problems.

"The beauty is we don't have to stick anybody with a needle or do more expensive tests. Now we have the possibility of using the power of data already available in the intensive care unit to greatly improve care for premature infants," study co-author Dr. Anna Penn, an assistant professor of pediatrics at the Stanford University School of Medicine and a neonatologist at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, said in a news release from the university.

The researchers, who report their findings in the Sept. 8 issue of the journal Science Translational Medicine, say their tool expands on the "Apgar" score, which doctors use shortly after birth to gauge the health of a newborn baby.

The researchers developed the PhysiScore system after studying 138 premature infants born between 2008 and 2009. All weighed less than 4 pounds, 6.5 ounces, and were born at 34 weeks of gestation or earlier.

Penn said the score provides more reliable information about a baby's medical prospects than the Apgar score. "With a PhysiScore, I could have two 25-week gestation, 700-gram [1.5-pound] babies and know that they each have a very different individual risk profile," she said.

One expert, Dr. F. Sessions Cole, chief medical officer at St. Louis Children's Hospital, said the Apgar score remains important in part because it requires doctors to closely examine babies and respond to medical problems.

"It is an important aid in assessing the success of the human newborn infant's transition from womb to world," Cole, who was not involved with the new study, said in an interview.

As for the new tool, Cole said more research is needed to prove that it works.

More information

For more on premature babies, visit the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

-- Randy Dotinga

SOURCES: Stanford University Medical Center, news release, Sept. 8, 2010; F. Sessions Cole, M.D., chief medical officer, director of newborn medicine, St. Louis Children's Hospital

Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Microsoft Excel-based algorithm predicts cancer prognosis
2. Personalized medicine: Molecular imaging predicts treatment success in many cancers
3. Tumor budding identified as predictor for unfavorable outcome in lung cancer
4. Study identifies factors which predict alcohol use after liver transplantation
5. Experts Predict Normal H1N1 Flu Season This Year
6. Iron-regulating protein is strong predictor of breast cancer prognosis, study shows
7. EEG predicts response to medication for schizophrenia
8. Heart Health Can Help Predict Brain Health: Study
9. Socioeconomic status predicts survival of Canadian cancer patients
10. Sleep Disorder May Help Predict Parkinsons Decades Earlier
11. Psychologists develop 2 potent new predictors of suicide risk
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
New Tool Aims to Predict Problems in Preemies
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... 2015 , ... TyloHelo Inc , North America’s largest ... accessories help improve the bather experience in the sauna, and the accessories selected ... purist looking for simplicity in design to accessories that encourage a greater expression ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... , ... November 25, 2015 , ... For the first ... “ Two Organizations, One Beat ” campaign. The partnership between the two groups began ... aid in MAP International’s cause. , MAP International was founded in 1954 and is ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... November 25, 2015 , ... On November 25, 2015, ... for the Narconon network, announced the release of a new cutting edge recovery program ... organization has been working with drug- and alcohol-addicted individuals with the purpose to free ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... , ... November 25, 2015 , ... Smiles by ... TMJ Disorder, Bruxism, and moderate facial wrinkling. While many patients are aware of the ... the great success Botox® delivers to those suffering with discomfort, soreness, and pain as ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... ... In an ongoing Clinical Study conducted by an independent physician, Andrew Gostine, ... evaluating the efficacy of its product and its disinfection protocol. This study is taking ... 2014 through October 2015 at a 360-bed, acute-care, academic medical center located in Chicago, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/25/2015)... , Nov. 25, 2015 USP ... hazardous drug preparations (e.g. pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, nurses, ... veterinary technicians). The chapter also covers all entities ... (e.g., pharmacies, hospitals, other healthcare institutions, patient treatment ... --> --> What ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... 25, 2015 Asia ... which BioLight and the New Investors will make a ... via a private placement. The financing will help IOPtima ... system used in the treatment of glaucoma, as well ... the IOPtimate™ system with the U.S. Food and Drug ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... LONDON , November 25, 2015 Developmental, ... key role in boosting the profitability of pharmaceutical products, ... Developmental, commercial, and regulatory/legal strategies all play ... says GBI Research . --> ... all play a key role in boosting the profitability of pharmaceutical ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: