Navigation Links
New Therapy for Enlarged Prostate May Bypass Unpleasant Side Effects
Date:3/29/2011

By Amanda Gardner
HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- A minimally invasive treatment for enlarged prostate that limits blood supply to the prostate seems to be just as effective as surgery but without the risk of debilitating side effects, such as impotence and urinary incontinence.

The treatment -- called prostatic artery embolization, or PAE -- is ready to be used in certain patients, namely those with a prostate larger than 60 cubic centimeters, "with severe lower urinary tract symptoms and a weakened urinary stream," said Dr. Joao Martins Pisco, lead author of a study slated to be presented March 29 at the annual meeting of the Society of Interventional Radiology in Chicago.

But other experts aren't so sure.

Drugs are used to treat most patients with an enlarged prostate, with only about 10 percent qualifying for surgery to remove the entire gland, said Dr. Elizabeth Kavaler, a urologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

"Because medication is so effective, most of the patients that we treat surgically are in pretty bad shape," she added. And while this study showed some symptomatic improvement, it didn't have enough objective data to show that the new technique would surpass surgery, she said.

Benign prostate hyperplasia, also known as enlarged prostate, is a non-cancerous condition familiar to millions of aging males. The condition occurs when the prostate gland slowly enlarges and presses on the urethra, constricting the flow of urine.

Enlarged prostate is characterized by a host of unpleasant symptoms, including weak or slow urine flow, an urgent need to urinate frequently, incomplete bladder emptying and having to get up repeatedly at night to urinate.

The surgery for enlarged prostate -- transurethral resection of the prostate, or TURP -- is used for men whose prostates are smaller than 60 to 80 cubic centimeters. The procedure is performed under general anesthesia and involves a hospital stay.

Meanwhile, there is no size limitation for PAE, which requires only local anesthesia and also lowers the risk of other side effects, such as blood loss and retrograde ejaculation, which occurs when semen leaks into the bladder, researchers said. PAE can be an outpatient procedure as well.

For the procedure, a catheter is inserted into the femoral artery in the groin. The catheter delivers tiny "grains" to the arteries that lead to the prostate, which block blood flow and lead to shriveling of the gland.

In this study, PAE helped most of the 67 patients who underwent the procedure, according to the researchers, who noted that 66 men who had not responded to medications experienced improvements in symptoms as well as a reduction in prostate volume. After nine months, none had experienced sexual dysfunction and 25 percent still reported improvements.

However, the authors did not see as great an improvement in "urodynamic" results, such as improved flow rate of the urine, which would indicate how well the bladder and urethra are performing; in this area, the patients did not improve as much as those who underwent TURP surgery, they noted.

Another drawback is that few doctors are trained in PAE so far, said Pisco, chair of radiology at Hospital Pulido Valente and professor in the Faculty of Medical Sciences at New University of Lisbon in Portugal.

Other minimally invasive treatments for enlarged prostate that are currently available are less effective and have a greater risk of a need for reoperation, according to background materials that accompanied the study.

Dr. Franklin Lowe, associate director of urology at St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital in New York City, said PAE was "unlikely" to be used much to treat enlarged prostate.

Current surgical procedures typically require no more than one night in the hospital and complications such as incontinence and impotence are uncommon, he said.

"PAE is potentially fraught with complications," Lowe said, adding that the study follow-up of less than one year was short for a disease that lasts decades.

Since the study is being presented at a medical meeting and has not yet been published in a peer-reviewed journal, the findings should be considered preliminary.

More information

The U.S. National Institutes of Health has more on enlarged prostate.

SOURCES: Joao Martins Pisco, M.D., professor and chair of radiology, Hospital Pulido Valente and professor, Faculty of Medical Sciences, New University of Lisbon, Portugal; Elizabeth Kavaler, M.D., urologist, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City; Franklin Lowe, M.D., associate director, urology, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital in New York City; Society of Interventional Radiology, study abstract and news release, March 29, 2011


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. For potentially crippling dystonia, earlier deep brain therapy gets better, quicker results
2. Scientists devise targeted therapy strategy for rare form of childhood cancer
3. FDA approves ipilimumab, an immunotherapy, to treat metastatic melanoma
4. Novel immunotherapy drug receives FDA approval for the treatment of metastatic melanoma
5. Interest in Toys May Predict Success of Autism Home Therapy
6. Short Course of Hormone Therapy Boosts Prostate Cancer Survival: Study
7. Penn researchers uncover novel immune therapy for pancreatic cancer
8. LSUHSC research finds protein that protects cancer cells from chemo and radiation therapy
9. Stem Cell Therapy Shrinks Enlarged Hearts
10. Self-administered light therapy may improve cognitive function after traumatic brain injury
11. Gene Therapy May Help Reverse Parkinsons Symptoms
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
New Therapy for Enlarged Prostate May Bypass Unpleasant Side Effects
(Date:3/28/2017)... ... March 28, 2017 , ... A recent Bellwether Education ... quality, the field must first improve teacher preparation program design. It then asserts ... and that decades of input- and outcome-based research has failed to improve teacher ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... ... March 28, 2017 , ... Greenfield Advisors ... brings his extensive knowledge of appraisals, property values, ad valorem taxation, and government ... valuation industry for more than 40 years. , “Ruel is a great addition ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... ... March 29, 2017 , ... Dr. Isabella Wentz, PharmD, FASCP, ... 9-part video series titled The Thyroid Secret. Dr. Wentz talked about journey and research ... the fact that medication IS NOT the only solution to deal with thyroid disease. ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... PA (PRWEB) , ... March 28, 2017 , ... ... for and by physicians, announced today the launch of a free, public-facing tool ... Via Cost Analyzer (VCA) was developed to provide comparative information to patients, providers, ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... ... , ... Usually, the impending arrival of warmer weather means the gleeful banishment ... double chin, this means more anxiety than elation. The cosmetic dermatology experts at Cosmetic ... double chin is undesirable,” Dr. Goldman said, “but it seems doubly so when the ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:3/29/2017)... 2017  Maxor National Pharmacy Services, LLC ("Maxor"), a ... named Leah Bailey as General Counsel.  Bailey will ... company. With more than 13 years of ... focused on health care, Bailey joins the Maxor team ... Bailey advised the PBM, Specialty, and Mail Order business ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... , March 29, 2017  Designers of primary ... reduce solution size by 50% and extend battery life ... power management integrated circuit (PMIC) from Maxim Integrated Products, ... supports a low input voltage of just 0.7V for ... and Silver Oxide, as well as the more common ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... Stryker announced today that it has been ... partnership with Great Place to Work (GPTW). We ranked ... list highlights the top U.S. companies with 1,000 or ... demonstrating respect, compassion and concern for their employees, their ... the companies on the list, GPTW asked more than ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: