Navigation Links
New Survey Shows Continued Progress in Reducing Youth Smoking; Congress, States Can Accelerate Declines by Implementing Proven Solutions
Date:12/11/2008

WASHINGTON, Dec. 11 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The following is a statement by Matthew L. Myers, President, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids:

(Logo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20080918/CFTFKLOGO)

It is good news for the nation's health that the 2008 Monitoring the Future survey released today finds that smoking rates among 8th, 10th and 12th graders have declined to the lowest levels recorded in this survey for all three grades. However, like other recent surveys of youth and adult smoking, this survey also shows that smoking declines have slowed in recent years. It would be a serious mistake to declare premature victory in the battle against tobacco use when one in five high school seniors still smokes.

This survey confirms that we know how to dramatically reduce tobacco use. But elected officials at all levels must resist complacency and step up the fight against the nation's number one cause of preventable death. It is especially critical that the incoming Administration and Congress provide long-missing national leadership by enacting legislation granting the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulatory authority over tobacco products. Among other things, this legislation would crack down on tobacco marketing and sales to kids.

There is much to celebrate in the Monitoring the Future survey, which was released by the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Since peaking in the mid-1990s, smoking rates (the percentage who have smoked in the past 30 days) have declined by 68 percent among 8th graders, 60 percent among 10th graders and 44 percent among 12th graders. These declines are a remarkable public health success story and will translate into improved health, longer lives and lower health care costs for generations to come.

These declines are powerful evidence that scientifically proven solutions, implemented primarily at the state and local level, are working. These include higher cigarette prices resulting from state cigarette tax increases and the 1998 state tobacco settlement; effective, well-funded tobacco prevention programs run by some states and nationally by the American Legacy Foundation; and a growing number of state and local laws requiring smoke-free workplaces and public places.

However, smoking declines among both youth and adults have slowed in recent years, following budget cuts to some tobacco prevention and cessation programs and huge increases in tobacco marketing expenditures. From 1998 to 2005, tobacco marketing nearly doubled from $6.9 billion to $13.4 billion, according to the most recent Federal Trade Commission data. Tobacco companies now spend the bulk of their marketing budgets on price discounts, which undermine efforts to discourage smoking by increasing cigarette prices.

The Monitoring the Future survey shows the impact of these harmful trends. It finds a statistically significant decline in smoking this year only among 10th graders. There has not been a statistically significant year-to-year decline in smoking among 12th graders since 2003, and 20.4 percent of high school seniors still smoke.

There is even greater cause for concern this year. The country's serious economic downturn - and resulting state budget shortfalls - have already resulted in cuts to tobacco prevention efforts and greater cuts are threatened. If the states cut funding for these important and effective programs, the progress we've made will be put at risk. The states this year will collect $24.6 billion in revenue from the tobacco settlement and tobacco taxes, so they have plenty of tobacco money to fund tobacco prevention.

There is no question that we know how to win the fight against tobacco use. What's needed is the political leadership to more aggressively implement proven solutions nationally and in every state. Recent landmark reports by the Institute of Medicine and the President's Cancer Panel have agreed on the steps that Congress and the states must take to accelerate declines in tobacco use - and eventually eliminate the death and disease it causes:

  • Congress should enact legislation granting the FDA authority to regulate the manufacturing, marketing and sale of tobacco products. The U.S. House of Representatives on July 30 voted 326 to 102 to approve this legislation, and it has 60 sponsors in the Senate, including President-elect Barack Obama and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid. This legislation presents the incoming Administration and Congress with the opportunity for an early, bipartisan victory that would significantly improve the nation's health.
  • Congress should also significantly increase the federal tobacco tax, fund national and state-based tobacco prevention and cessation campaigns, and require coverage by all public and private health plans of interventions (including counseling and medications) proven to help smokers quit.
  • Every state should fund a tobacco prevention and cessation program at the level recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Unfortunately, as a report released last month by the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids and our partners showed, no state is currently meeting the CDC's recommendation, and only nine states are funding prevention programs at even half the CDC's recommendation. In the last 10 years, the states have received $203.5 billion in tobacco-generated revenue from the tobacco settlement and tobacco taxes, but have spent only 3.2 percent of it ($6.5 billion) on tobacco prevention and cessation programs.
  • The states should also enact comprehensive smoke-free workplace laws and further increase tobacco taxes. To date, 24 states and the District of Columbia have enacted smoke-free laws that include restaurants and bars. Every state should do so. While 44 states and the District of Columbia have increased tobacco taxes in recent years, there are vast disparities in state tobacco tax rates, from 7 cents per pack in South Carolina and 17 cents in Missouri to $2.75 in New York and $2.58 in New Jersey.

Tobacco use remains the leading cause of preventable death in the United States, killing more than 400,000 people and costing the nation nearly $100 billion in health care bills each year. While our nation has made remarkable progress in reducing smoking, political complacency and the tobacco companies' aggressive marketing threaten continued progress. If Congress and the states show the political will to implement proven solutions, we can win one of the most significant public health victories in our nation's history.

More information on the Monitoring the Future survey can be found at www.monitoringthefuture.org.


'/>"/>
SOURCE Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids
Copyright©2008 PR Newswire.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Survey reveals disparities in skin cancer knowledge, protection among high school students
2. New Survey Shows Americans are Still Concerned About Food Safety, Yet Still Not Smart About What They Like to Eat
3. One of the Largest Post-WHI Physician Surveys Shows More Education is Needed: Patient Misinformation About Hormone Therapy Remains High
4. Hospitals Could Improve Outcomes for Patients and Save Millions According to Hill-Rom 10th Annual Pressure Ulcer Survey
5. Youth Drug Use at a Five Year Low, New Survey Shows
6. Survey From The Partnership and MetLife Foundation Reveals Important Role Todays Grandparents Play in Teens Lives
7. Parental surveys boost diagnosis abilities of pediatricians
8. National Survey Shows Employee Fears About Consumer-Driven Health Plans on Decline
9. JHA Releases 2007 U.S. Group Disability Mid-Year Market Survey Results
10. PA Health Department Survey Shows Impact of Income, Gender, Other Factors on Health and Access to Health Care
11. Launch of second European Cancer Research Funding survey
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:8/22/2017)... ... August 22, 2017 , ... ... announce the addition of Zack Tisch as the firm’s new Consulting Services Executive. ... IT consulting firm’s national accounts, from assisting clients with initial vendor selection and ...
(Date:8/22/2017)... ... ... Glass is new to the Texas market, but is proudly managed by widely recognized All ... models, in Grand Prairie, TX, located in the center of the DFW Metroplex, the fourth ... for the past 40 years with 32 convenient locations in Texas, Nevada and California resulting ...
(Date:8/22/2017)... ... August 22, 2017 , ... “Covert Awakening”: Walid’s spiritual journey ... author, Julianne Hale, a consultant for the Intelligence Community. For more than ... the Near East region. Julianne has written hundreds of reports for the ...
(Date:8/22/2017)... ... August 22, 2017 , ... “Call Of Spiritual Duty”: a revelation in an ... author, C.S. Lizarde. Growing up on the streets of North Visalia, California, Carlos ... to apply the Biblical keys to his life, he noticed immediately that opportunities and ...
(Date:8/21/2017)... Garden City, NY (PRWEB) , ... August 22, ... ... (NAPW) honors Judith I. Stevens as a 2017-2018 inductee into ... distinction for leadership in entrepreneurship. NAPW is the nation’s leading networking organization exclusively ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:8/17/2017)... Bio-Ess Laboratories, LLC Chief Science Officer, Dr. Adam Elhofy , will ... Cell-Ess® Universal Titer Boost at the 9 th annual ... 21-25.  The Bioprocessing Summit convenes more than 1,000 international bioprocess professionals to ... ... Cell-Ess is the ...
(Date:8/15/2017)...  AOTI Inc. announced today that its fully owned ... a New York City Office in Yonkers, New York ... Wound Oxygen (TWO 2 ) homecare therapy. This new East Coast ... Care (ACHC) under the company,s DMEPOS accreditation for Home/Durable Medical Equipment ... Advanced Oxygen Therapy ...
(Date:8/8/2017)... Second-quarter 2017 revenues of $876 ... from continuing operations Second-quarter ... $110 million Second-quarter 2017 ... Second-quarter 2017 adjusted diluted ... percent to $0.93 Second-quarter ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: