Navigation Links
New Raccoon Virus May Offer Clues to Human Cancer
Date:12/28/2012

FRIDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Rare brain tumors found in raccoons in Northern California and Oregon may be linked to a new virus, according to a new study.

Researchers, led by scientists from the University of California, Davis, said their findings could shed light on how viruses cause cancer in both animals and humans.

"Understanding how infectious agents may contribute to cancer in animals has provided fundamental new knowledge on the cause of cancer in people," Michael Lairmore, dean of the university's School of Veterinary Medicine, said in a university news release.

Autopsies performed on raccoons beginning in March 2010 revealed 10 raccoons had brain tumors. Of these raccoons, nine were from Northern California. The additional raccoon was sent to the university by researchers at Oregon State University.

All of the tumors found in these raccoons had a new virus, known as raccoon polyomavirus. Since the study was completed, two more raccoons with brain tumors and the virus were found in two additional counties.

The study was published recently in the journal Emerging Infectious Diseases.

"Raccoons hardly ever get tumors," noted study author Patricia Pesavento, a pathologist with the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine. "That's why we take notice when we get three tumors, much less 12."

Polyomaviruses are known to cause cancer under laboratory conditions. Less is known about their ability to cause cancer in people under normal conditions. Based on their findings, the researchers suggested this virus may play a role in tumor formation.

Humans and other animals are unlikely to become infected because polyomaviruses rarely spread between species, the researchers said.

The study's authors noted there are high rates of cancer among wildlife living in close proximity to humans, and more research is needed to investigate other possible causes of the cancer, including environmental toxins and genetics.

"This is just the beginning of a story. Wildlife live in our fields, our trash cans, our sewer lines -- and that's where we dump things," Pesavento said. "Humans need to be guardians of the wildlife-human interface, and raccoons are important sentinel animals. They really are exquisitely exposed to our waste. We may be contributing to their susceptibility in ways we haven't discovered."

Viruses and other infectious pathogens are linked to up to 20 percent of all human cancers worldwide, according to the American Cancer Society.

More information

The U.S. National Cancer Institute provides more information on cancer causes and risk factors.

-- Mary Elizabeth Dallas

SOURCE: University of California, Davis, news release, December 2012


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Smoking Deadlier For HIV Patients Than Virus Itself: Study
2. UNC researchers discover how hepatitis C virus reprograms human liver cells
3. HPV in older women may be due to reactivation of virus, not new infection
4. Dishwashing Wont Kill Tummy-Troubling Norovirus: Study
5. Study Finds New SARS-Like Virus Spread Through Bats, Pigs
6. Keck School of Medicine of USC researchers find clue to how Hepatitis C virus harms liver
7. Crucial step in AIDS virus maturation simulated for first time
8. Pitt research sheds new light on virus associated with developmental delays and deafness
9. Mans best friend: Common canine virus may lead to new vaccines for deadly human diseases
10. UNC, Vanderbilt discover a new live vaccine approach for SARS and novel coronaviruses
11. Lab Contamination Behind Debunked Link Between Virus, Prostate Cancer
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
New Raccoon Virus May Offer Clues to Human Cancer
(Date:12/6/2016)... ... December 06, 2016 , ... U.S. Security Associates (USA) ... 125 for their industry leading training methods that engage their associates and link ... the global elite in employer-sponsored training and development programs. , “The 2017 Training ...
(Date:12/5/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... December 06, 2016 , ... For many ... Lithuanian poetry , both thick and thin. The beauty of the Lithuanian language ... Trafford Publishing). , In this poetry book, Zubinas lyrically explores all aspects of a ...
(Date:12/5/2016)... ... 2016 , ... “Epilepsy Awareness,” which can be found at ... conversation about epilepsy, bearing down on the social stigma and lack of public ... epilepsy within their lifetime. With such a large percentage of people affected, it’s ...
(Date:12/5/2016)... ... ... BSI and Brenntag Canada have been appointed by Chr. Hansen as their ... fruits and beverage colorants effective November 1, 2016. , “The ... product portfolio,” said Steve Brauer, President of Brenntag Specialties, Inc. “Representing Chr. Hansen will ...
(Date:12/5/2016)... ... December 05, 2016 , ... ... ("GPP") portfolio company, today announced it has acquired the assets of Frankfurt, ... previously a subsidiary of Chiltern International and focuses on clinical trial drug ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/5/2016)... OSWEGO, Ore. , Dec. 5, 2016   ... the BioInsight clinical study. The study evaluates the safety ... insertion procedure in an office setting. BioMonitor ... ® technology that is placed underneath a patient,s ... fibrillation and syncope (fainting). Atrial fibrillation is a leading ...
(Date:12/5/2016)... --  TrainerMD , the first HIPAA compliant software collaboration platform for ... Styku . Styku, a California -based ... users world-class, real-time 3D body scanning and analysis. Together with its ... hear and feel their health like never before. ... , , ...
(Date:12/5/2016)... 5, 2016  Recently Zymo Research announced an ... known as Horvath,s Clock. Based on this technology, ... service to academic and biopharma scientific researchers to ... other than sperm. The service quantifies ... age versus chronological age following drug treatments and ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: