Navigation Links
New Hope for Liver Diseases
Date:5/23/2008

Scientists generate liver cells from embryonic stem cells, find clues to predict response to therapy

FRIDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- Human liver cells have been generated from embryonic stem cells using a new model, hopefully opening the door to help scientists screen for harmful side effects of new drugs before they are used in patients.

That was one of several reports on advances against liver diseases that were presented this week at Digestive Disease Week 2008 in San Diego.

Other presentations involved ways to predict which patients with hepatitis C might benefit from long-term antibiotic therapy and information about how monitoring the body's viral load in hepatitis B patients may help predict liver cancer.

Scientists from the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, reported they had efficiently generated human liver cells from embryonic stem cells without the problems that have plagued scientists in the past. The new model is unique, said Dr. David Hay, a senior fellow at the university's MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, who spoke at a press conference Tuesday.

His team developed a model that allows them to focus on key enzymes which are crucial in drug metabolism. Other clinical applications, he said, include the fact that the liver cells generated in vitro could be used in bioartificial devices, helping maintain normal function when the liver fails.

Down the road, said another investigator, Dr. Philip Newsome, the hope is that the cells could be used in liver transplantation.

The advance was praised by the press conference moderator, Dr. John M. Vierling, chief of hepatology at Baylor College of Medicine, in Houston.

The team produced "highly differentiated cells that maintain function," Vierling said, a feat that has thus far proved elusive to others working on the effort. "It is an extraordinarily rich advance to be exploited in many ways," he added.

Predicting which patients with chronic hepatitis C infection, another liver ailment, will respond to treatment may be done by monitoring the dendritic cells, the cells that are the most potent stimulator of the immune system's T-cells, said Dr. John Mengshol, a fellow in the department of gastroenterology and hepatology at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, in Denver.

Treatment for hepatitis C virus routinely involves 48 weeks of combination antiviral therapy. Side effects include flu-like symptoms, and treatment is successful in only half of patients.

So, predicting who will and won't respond would be helpful. Mengshol and his colleagues evaluated 64 patients with hepatitis C virus of the genotype 1, the most common strain and the most difficult to treat.

Researchers have found that therapy affects the dendritic cells differently. Mengshol's team studied blood samples from each patient before treatment and at 24 weeks after starting it. They looked at the population of two different types of dendritic cells, among other factors.

Levels of one type of dendrite cells normalized in those who responded to the treatment, while levels of those who did not respond did not.

Why some patients respond to therapy and others don't has been an ongoing mystery, Mengshol said. Monitoring the dendritic cells may help doctors determine who might respond to therapy.

In another study, Dr. Uchenna Iloeje, director of virology for Global Clinical Research at Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., reported that monitoring the viral load of hepatitis B virus in patients with that disease is a significant predictor of who will be likely to get liver cancer.

In the study, researchers followed more than 3,500 patients for 11.5 years, Iloeje said.

"Over time, those at highest risk of liver disease had a sustained hepatitis B load," he said.

The liver is the largest organ inside the body. It changes food into energy, cleans alcohol and poisons from the blood, and makes bile, a liquid that aids digestion.

More information

For more on liver diseases, go to Medline Plus.



SOURCES: John M. Vierling, M.D., professor, medicine and surgery, chief, hepatology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston; John Mengshol, M.D., Ph.D., fellow, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver; Uchenna Iloeje, M.P.H, M.B.B.S., director, virology, Global Clinical Research, Bristol-Myers Squibb; May 20, 2008, presentations, Digestive Disease Week 2008, San Diego


'/>"/>
Copyright©2008 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Sea Buckthorn Leaves May Hold Benefit for the Liver
2. Arctic explorer delivers unique snow-depth data for CryoSat
3. Miracle leaves that may help protect against liver damage
4. The Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia Opens the Worlds First Delivery Unit for Mothers Diagnosed with Birth Defects in Fetus
5. What roles does TSP-1 play in liver fibrogenesis?
6. Is extra-corporal liver support with prometheus safe in patients with end-stage liver disease?
7. Medco, Healthways Launch Center for Health Action to Deliver Optimal Health(TM)
8. Risk threshold of daily alcohol intake and drinking duration in liver injury?
9. Study concludes no racial disparities in long-term outcomes in recipients of liver transplants
10. AmeriCares Delivers Life-Saving Aid to Myanmar
11. Supreme Master Ching Hai International Association Delivering US$160,000 in Aid to Earthquake Survivors in China
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
New Hope for Liver Diseases
(Date:2/13/2016)... ... ... an Au Pair comes all the way around the world to provide child ... are often worried things won’t go well. More often than not, however, they find out ... the Year winner’s all commented how their Au Pairs have become a part of the ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... February 12, 2016 , ... The law ... Landry and Evangeline Parishes. The purpose of these scholarships is to encourage applicants ... those individuals to seek employment within these two parishes. , “We have available ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... ... February 12, 2016 , ... Each year, the American ... held in Anaheim, CA at the Anaheim Convention Center. Almost 10,000 physical therapists across ... therapy products in action, learn more about their chosen field and network with their ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... Miami, FL (PRWEB) , ... February 12, 2016 ... ... Workspace as a Service (WaaS), today announced the integration of Clarity Intelligence Platform ... itopia’s channel partners to offer real-time business intelligence (BI) to their small and ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... ... February 12, 2016 , ... Vail knee specialist Robert ... to Know in 2016 . The list consists of physicians establishing, leading and partnering ... this list. , An Ambulatory Surgery Center, also known as an ASC, is ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/12/2016)... BUFORD, Ga. , Feb. 12 2016  OMS ... office-based dental and medical practitioners, announced today the recent ... website offers visitors a variety of features that enhance ... purchase oral surgery supplies. --> ... Supply is a fairly new company that started in ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... February 12, 2016 ... auf den ungedeckten medizinischen Bedarf bei Lungen- ... seines klinischen Forschungsprogramms bekannt. Das Programm, das ... Verbesserungen ihrer respiratorischen Funktionen und anderer klinischer ... ein Medizintechnikunternehmen, das sich auf den ungedeckten ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... , Feb. 11, 2016 The primary goal ... future adoption patterns on the usage of liquid biopsy. ... following: - Timeframe of liquid biopsy adoption ... cfDNA and Evs—by organization type - Sample inflow to ... blood, saliva, stool, serum, and so on. - Correlation ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: