Navigation Links
Neurons derived from cord blood cells may represent new therapeutic option
Date:7/16/2012

LA JOLLA, CA----For more than 20 years, doctors have been using cells from blood that remains in the placenta and umbilical cord after childbirth to treat a variety of illnesses, from cancer and immune disorders to blood and metabolic diseases.

Now, scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies have found a new way-using a single protein, known as a transcription factor-to convert cord blood (CB) cells into neuron-like cells that may prove valuable for the treatment of a wide range of neurological conditions, including stroke, traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury.

The researchers demonstrated that these CB cells, which come from the mesoderm, the middle layer of embryonic germ cells, can be switched to ectodermal cells, outer layer cells from which brain, spinal and nerve cells arise. "This study shows for the first time the direct conversion of a pure population of human cord blood cells into cells of neuronal lineage by the forced expression of a single transcription factor," says Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte, a professor in Salk's Gene Expression Laboratory, who led the research team. The study, a collaboration with Fred H. Gage, a professor in Salk's Laboratory of Genetics, and his team, was published on July 16 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

"Unlike previous studies, where multiple transcription factors were necessary to convert skin cells into neurons, our method requires only one transcription factor to convert CB cells into functional neurons," says Gage.

The Salk researchers used a retrovirus to introduce Sox2, a transcription factor that acts as a switch in neuronal development, into CB cells. After culturing them in the laboratory, they discovered colonies of cells expressing neuronal markers. Using a variety of tests, they determined that the new cells, called induced neuronal-like cells (iNC), could transmit electrical impulses, signaling that the cells were mature and functional neurons. Additionally, they transferred the Sox2-infused CB cells to a mouse brain and found that they integrated into the existing mouse neuronal network and were capable of transmitting electrical signals like mature functional neurons.

"We also show that the CB-derived neuronal cells can be expanded under certain conditions and still retain the ability to differentiate into more mature neurons both in the lab and in a mouse brain," says Mo Li, a scientist in Belmonte's lab and a co-first author on the paper with Alessandra Giorgetti, of the Center for Regenerative Medicine, in Barcelona, and Carol Marchetto of Gage's lab. "Although the cells we developed were not for a specific lineage-for example, motor neurons or mid-brain neurons-we hope to generate clinically relevant neuronal subtypes in the future."

Importantly, says Marchetto, "We could use these cells in the future for modeling neurological diseases such as autism, schizophrenia, Parkinson's or Alzheimer's disease."

Cord blood cells, says Giorgetti, offer a number of advantages over other types of stem cells. First, they are not embryonic stem cells and thus they are not controversial. They are more plastic, or flexible, than adult stem cells from sources like bone marrow, which may make them easier to convert into specific cell lineages. The collection of CB cells is safe and painless and poses no risk to the donor, and they can be stored in blood banks for later use.

"If our protocol is developed into a clinical application, it could aid in future cell-replacement therapies," says Li. "You could search all the cord blood banks in the country to look for a suitable match."


'/>"/>

Contact: Andy Hoang
ahoang@salk.edu
619-861-5811
Salk Institute
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. Specific protein triggers changes in neurons in brain reward center linked to cocaine addiction
2. Neurons that control overeating also drive appetite for cocaine
3. Biosynthetic grape-derived compound prevents progression of Alzheimers disease in mice
4. Notre Dame researchers paper examines the biology of tumor-derived microvesicles
5. Celebrex-derived drug targets common childhood bone tumor
6. Cells derived from debrided burn tissue may be useful for tissue engineering
7. Infection Might Raise Blood Clot Risk for Older Adults: Study
8. Normalizing tumor blood vessels improves delivery of only the smallest nanomedicines
9. Common Blood Pressure Drug Safe for Heart Failure: Study
10. Certain Birth Control Pills May Carry Higher Blood Clot Risk: FDA
11. High Blood Pressure May Be Especially Lethal for Blacks
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Neurons derived from cord blood cells may represent new therapeutic option
(Date:1/24/2017)... ... January 24, 2017 , ... Bellus Medical, a leader in medical ... experts. In his new role Dr. Dobke will provide physician oversight for in-house clinical ... the Head of Plastic Surgery and Associate Professor of Surgery at UC San Diego ...
(Date:1/24/2017)... ... , ... The University of Iowa, long recognized as one of the top ... provides teachers with the specific skills and training they need to teach English as ... students and HigherEducation.com is working to ensure that this new program is available to ...
(Date:1/24/2017)... ... January 24, 2017 , ... Date aired: January ... Sharon Kleyne, the nation’s foremost water advocate and host of the nationally syndicated ... on Voice America, once again welcomed one of her favorite guests and colleagues, ...
(Date:1/24/2017)... Overland Park, KS (PRWEB) , ... January 24, ... ... rating to Premensa, a leading natural supplement for relieving premenstrual syndrome, or ... premenstrual syndrome at some point. These symptoms can include cramps, constipation, irritability, headaches, ...
(Date:1/24/2017)... ... 24, 2017 , ... “Spiritual Vitamins: A Spiritual Energy Booster”: ... “Spiritual Vitamins: A Spiritual Energy Booster” is the creation of published author, Mathai ... new book engages the mind and spirit in a quest for fulfillment and ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/24/2017)... Jan 24, 2017 Research and Markets has ... - Sensor, Actuator - Forecast to 2025" report to their ... Global ... 17.6% over the next decade to reach approximately $76.24 million by ... is witnessing include growing count of labs using optogentic techniques for ...
(Date:1/24/2017)... , January 24, 2017 ... dem Molecular Surgical Laboratory des Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) ... Dabei geht es um die Identifizierung und Validierung neuartiger ... Ansätzen, dass sie der Resistenz von Antibiotika bei der ... ...
(Date:1/24/2017)... -- Scope of the Report The report titled ... Market (2016-2020)", provides an in-depth analysis of the global ... line. The market also provides an in-depth analysis of ... a regional analysis of continence care market, including the ... Europe and Rest of the World. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: