Navigation Links
Neighborhood ethnic density associated with risk of psychosis among immigrants in the Netherlands
Date:2/4/2008

February 4, 2008 -- In a study on neighborhood ethnic density, collaborating researchers from Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and The Hague, Netherlands, report that immigrants who live in neighborhoods where their own ethnic group comprise a small proportion of the population are at increased risk for certain psychotic disorders. The findings confirm the potential importance of environment and social experiences that may contribute to these disorders, including schizophrenia, one of the leading causes of long-term disability. The study underscores the necessity for public health clinicians to pay attention to the mental health needs of immigrants, and highlights the importance of cultural sensitivity when treating immigrant and minority patients. The paper is published in the January 2008 issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry.

The team conducted diagnostic interviews with individuals living in The Hague, Netherlands who contacted a physician for a suspected psychotic disorder over a seven-year period (1997-1999 and 2000-2005). The results were then analyzed by ethnicity and neighborhood of residence. A high ethnic density neighborhood was defined as one in which 65 percent of the population was immigrant; because immigrant communities in the Netherlands tend to cluster in the same areas, those neighborhoods were also ones in which the proportion of any one immigrants ethnic group was substantial. All other neighborhoods were defined as low ethnic density. Compared with native Dutch, the incidence of psychotic disorders for first and second generation immigrants from Morocco, Surinam, and Turkey living in The Hague was significantly increased in low ethnic density neighborhoods. Immigrant populations in these neighborhoods had psychotic disorders more than two times the rate of immigrants living in high ethnic density neighborhoods. While the findings were consistent for all three ethnic groups, Moroccans had the highest incidence of schizophrenia in both high and low density neighborhoods.

A landmark U.S. study in the 1930s reported higher hospital admission rates for schizophrenia among ethnic minorities who lived in neighborhoods with a low proportion of persons belonging to their own ethnic group. It now appears they may have been right; it matters where you live, said Ezra Susser, MD, DrPH, chair of the Department of Epidemiology at the Mailman School of Public Health, and research scientist at the New York State Psychiatric Institute and co-author of the study. Increasingly, investigators suspected that the social experiences of immigrant groups after migration contribute to their elevated risk. However, until this body of research -- large enough to examine the incidence of psychotic disorders for immigrant groups within a single urban area -- few studies had the data to confirm that increased incidence of psychotic disorders among immigrants depended strongly on neighborhood context, noted Dr. Susser.

The researchers also adjusted for single marital status, which has been associated with higher rates of schizophrenia, particularly in neighborhoods with fewer single-person households. Results remained statistically significant, indicating that the ethnic density effect cannot be attributed to a greater probability of single marital status among individuals living in low-ethnic-density neighborhoods, according to Hans Wijbrand Hoek, MD PhD, adjunct professor of Epidemiology at the Mailman School and senior author.

Neighborhood ethnic density was assessed and investigated at the time of first treatment contact. In future studies, the researchers suggest it might be feasible to collect data on neighborhood context in childhood and adolescence. This approach could be used to determine the developmental period during which neighborhood ethnic density is most important.


'/>"/>

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Breast cancer diagnosis comes late for women in gentrifying neighborhoods
2. Kids in Poor Neighborhoods Fall Behind in School
3. Dysfunctional families and bad neighborhoods may worsen asthma in children and adolescents
4. In the Neighborhood: Blood Cancer Strikes Wisteria Lane
5. Drinking Often Spurs Move to Poorer Neighborhoods
6. Ethnic discrimination not only based on prejudice
7. Racial and ethnic differences in the biology of breast cancer tumors
8. Genetic differences point to ethnic and racial disparities in colorectal cancer risk
9. Attitudes toward mammography differ across ethnicities, cultures, backgrounds
10. Study examines ethnic differences in sleep quality and blood pressure
11. Racial and ethnic differences in colorectal cancer emphasize importance of screening
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:8/20/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... August 20, 2017 , ... State Farm ... of 40 national causes up for a $25,000 grant. If the initiative wins, Gals ... bullying – will expand into the Tri-County area of St. Mary’s, Calvert and Charles ...
(Date:8/19/2017)... ... August 18, 2017 , ... President Donald Trump signed into ... provides for greater public access to over-the-counter (OTC) hearing aids. , The measure ... aids without being seen by a certified and licensed audiologist. , “The ...
(Date:8/19/2017)... ... August 19, 2017 , ... ... diverse community of over 1,000 passionate employees, caregivers, volunteers, thought leaders, researchers, educators ... Stonegate changed ownership, it was time to refresh the carpeting with the goal ...
(Date:8/18/2017)... , ... ... ... For Immediate Release                Contact: ... Shows Young Women Seek Sex and Relationship Advice from their ...
(Date:8/18/2017)... Ca (PRWEB) , ... August 18, 2017 , ... ... quality liquid handling handheld devices. Through an educational webinar, they will present the ... users a chance to learn how easy you can automate everyday pipetting tasks. ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:7/27/2017)... -- Zimmer Biomet Holdings, Inc. (NYSE and SIX: ZBH) today reported ... The Company reported second quarter net sales of $1.954 ... period, and an increase of 2.1% on a constant ... from the LDR Holding Corporation acquisition, second quarter 2017 ... or 0.3% on a constant currency basis. ...
(Date:7/26/2017)... -- E.I. Medical Imaging (EIMI) has partnered with Dr. ... the worlds first ultrasound system to be used underwater to ... In preparation for a piece produced by Icon films ... Guttridge approached EIMI with the idea of an underwater ultrasound ... underwater. EIMI produces ...
(Date:7/26/2017)... RIVIERA BEACH, Fla. , July 26, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... completion of enrollment of our clinical trial evaluating Altemia ... Sickle Cell Anemia (SCA) and Sickle Cell Disease (SCD). ... study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Altemia ... This trial is conducted under US IND 125274. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: