Navigation Links
Negative social interactions increase hypertension risk in older adults
Date:5/28/2014

PITTSBURGHKeeping your friends close and your enemies closer may not be the best advice if you are 50 or older.

New research from Carnegie Mellon University's Rodlescia Sneed and Sheldon Cohen shows that unpleasant or demanding interpersonal encounters increase hypertension risk among older adults.

Published in the American Psychological Association's journal Health Psychology, the study provides some of the first concrete evidence that negative social interactions not only influence psychological well-being but also physical health in this case, blood pressure levels. Hypertension affects an estimated 65 million Americans and is a major contributor to cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death in the U.S.

"This demonstrates how important social networks are as we age - constructing strong, positive relationships are beneficial to prolonged health," said Cohen, the Robert E. Doherty University Professor of Psychology in the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences.

For the study, Sneed and Cohen used data from the Health and Retirement Study, a multi-year survey of 1,502 healthy adults aged 50 and over. In 2006, the frequency of negative interactions exchanges or behaviors that involved excessive demands, criticism, disappointment or other unpleasantness with their partners, children, other family members and friends was assessed by questionnaire. Blood pressure was measured at this assessment as well as four years later.

The results show that each increase in the total average negative social interaction score was associated with a 38 percent increased chance of developing hypertension over the four-year period. Younger older adults those aged 51-64 were also more affected than those 65 or older.

The researchers also observed sex differences in their findings. While negative interactions predicted hypertension risk among women, these interactions were not related to hypertension risk among men.

"There is a body of evidence in social psychology research suggesting that women care more about and pay more attention to the quality of their relationships," said Sneed, a Ph.D. candidate in psychology. "Our findings suggest that women are particularly sensitive to negative interactions, which is consistent with this previous work."

The researchers also found that the type of relationship matters. Negative interactions between friends and family led to an increase in hypertension risk while poor encounters with partners and children did not make a difference.

"Interpersonal conflicts are the most commonly reported stressor, so understanding their impact on health and well-being is particularly important," said Sneed.


'/>"/>
Contact: Shilo Rea
shilo@cmu.edu
412-268-6094
Carnegie Mellon University
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Two new possible drug targets for triple negative breast cancer
2. Negative iron balance predicts acute heart failure survival
3. New way to predict response to chemo in triple-negative breast cancer
4. Triple negative breast cancer, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status
5. Psilocybin inhibits the processing of negative emotions in the brain
6. Gene implicated in progression and relapse of deadly breast cancer finding points to potential Achilles heel in triple negative breast cancer
7. Increased risk of relapse omitting RT in early PET scan negative Hodgkin lymphoma
8. Negative effects of joining a gang last long after gang membership ends
9. HPV-positive SCCOP patients recurrence differs from HPV-negative patients
10. Negative BRCA testing may not always imply lowered breast cancer risk
11. Urinary Tract Infection Market (UTI): Gram-Negative Bacterial 2022 Epidemiology Forecasts in New Research Report at RnRMarketResearch.com
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/3/2016)... ... 04, 2016 , ... The National Association of Professional Women (NAPW) ... the Year Circle. She is recognized with this prestigious distinction for leadership in business. ... 850,000 members and over 200 operating Local Chapters. , “I’m pleased to welcome Barbara ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... AZ (PRWEB) , ... May 03, 2016 , ... ... NCPDP presented its 2016 Champion Award to Charles D. Pulido, R.Ph., Co-Founder ... Lee Wilkins, Pharm.D., M.S., Ph.D., Pharmacy Advisor and Health IT Specialist, Office of ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... ... May 03, 2016 , ... ... – a web application that helps people assess their risk of developing Alzheimer’s ... app will provide users a “Risk Reduction Score™” that summarizes how their lifestyle ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... May 03, 2016 , ... ... a process that selects DNA or RNA from a random library of sequences ... be used as drugs or diagnostic agents. SELEX selection is commonly performed using ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... ... May 03, 2016 , ... Elizabeth Murray has always loved walking one ... with one on her shoulder and one on her arm. But she got to ... years of mitral valve prolapse. , The valves of the heart wouldn’t close properly ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/3/2016)... LAKE OSWEGO, Ore. , May 3, 2016 ... and endovascular medical technology, today announced Food and ... a cardiac resynchronization defibrillator that provides heart failure ... (MRI) scans. Iperia devices also have remote monitoring ... (CLS) that adapts the heart rate in response ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... YORK , May 3, 2016 ... (MRI) Market Size, Share, Development, Growth and Demand Forecast ... Open), by Field Strength (High Field, Very High Field, ... Application (Brain, Head and Neck, Spine, Musculoskeletal, Vascular, Breast, ... the global magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) market was valued ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... LONDON , May 3, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... gaben heute bekannt, dass sie einen entscheidenden ... erreicht haben: Ein Aufruf zum Handeln, um ... Diese Veröffentlichung trägt zu Fortschritten im Verständnis ... Notwendigkeit hervor, ein Bewusstsein für Hepatische Enzephalopathie ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: