Navigation Links
Nanoparticles to probe mystery sperm defects behind infertility
Date:11/15/2013

A way of using nanoparticles to investigate the mechanisms underlying 'mystery' cases of infertility has been developed by scientists at Oxford University.

The technique, published in Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine, could eventually help researchers to discover the causes behind cases of unexplained infertility and develop treatments for affected couples. The method involves loading porous silica nanoparticle 'envelopes' with compounds to identify, diagnose or treat the causes of infertility.

The researchers demonstrated that the nanoparticles could be attached to boar sperm with no detrimental effects on their function.

'An attractive feature of nanoparticles is that they are like an empty envelope that can be loaded with a variety of compounds and inserted into cells,' says Dr Natalia Barkalina, lead author of the study from the Nuffield Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at Oxford University. 'The nanoparticles we use don't appear to interfere with the sperm, making them a perfect delivery vessel.

'We will start with compounds to investigate the biology of infertility, and within a few years may be able to explain or even diagnose rare cases in patients. In future we could even deliver treatments in a similar way.'

Sperm are difficult to study due to their small size, unusual shape and short lifetime outside of the body. Yet this is a vital part of infertility research, as senior author Dr Kevin Coward explains: 'To discover the causes of infertility, we need to investigate sperm to see where the problems start. Previous methods involved complicated procedures in animals and introduced months of delays before the sperm could be used.

'Now, we can simply expose sperm to nanoparticles in a petri dish. It's so simple that it can all be done quickly enough for the sperm to survive perfectly unharmed.'

The team, based at the Institute of Reproductive Sciences, used boar sperm because of its similarities to human sperm, as study co-author Celine Jones explains: 'It is similar in size, shape and activity. Now that we have proven the system in boar sperm, we hope to replicate our findings in human sperm and eventually see if we can use them to deliver compounds to eggs as well.'

The research was an interdisciplinary effort, involving reproductive biologists from the Nuffield Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology and nanoscientists from the Department of Engineering Science led by Dr Helen Townley.

The study was funded by the Nuffield Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology at Oxford University and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC). This technique is the subject of patent applications held by Isis Innovation, Oxford University's technology transfer arm.


'/>"/>

Contact: University of Oxford Press Office
press.office@admin.ox.ac.uk
44-018-652-80528
University of Oxford
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. Shape of nanoparticles points the way toward more targeted drugs
2. New gene delivery method: magnetic nanoparticles
3. Shape-shifting nanoparticles flip from sphere to net in response to tumor signal
4. Mayo Clinic: How gold nanoparticles can help fight ovarian cancer
5. New technique can help nanoparticles deliver drug treatments
6. Nanoparticles loaded with bee venom kill HIV
7. Researchers show that lipid nanoparticles are ideal for delivering genes and drugs
8. New electrically-conductive polymer nanoparticles can generate heat to kill colorectal cancer cells
9. UGA researchers boost efficacy of drugs by using nanoparticles to target powerhouse of cells
10. Nanoparticles detect biochemistry of inflammation
11. Improved nanoparticles deliver drugs into brain
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Nanoparticles to probe mystery sperm defects behind infertility
(Date:2/12/2016)... , ... February 12, 2016 ... ... today announced a new initiative—the Siemens Foundation-PATH Ingenuity Fellowships—to develop the advanced ... will recruit top students from U.S. universities who will draw from Siemens’ ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... ... ... Each year, the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) offers a Combined Sections Meeting. ... Almost 10,000 physical therapists across the country are expected to attend this annual convention ... field and network with their colleagues. As in years past, HydroWorx is proud ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... ... February 12, 2016 , ... The ThedaCare ... San Francisco General Hospital on April 5-7. The series is a multi-day, multi-workshop ... habits. The workshops cover a broad range of topics, including coaching skills, the ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... NC (PRWEB) , ... February 12, 2016 , ... AssureVest ... surrounding areas, is initiating a charity drive that will raise funds earmarked to purchase ... John C. Tayloe Elementary School. , “My school is in a low-income area and ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... ... February 12, 2016 , ... Young Asset ... celebrates the beginning of the latest charity campaign in their community enrichment program. ... Donations to this worthy cause are currently being accepted at: http://artexpressioninc.org/ . ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/12/2016)... LOUISVILLE, Ky. , Feb. 12, 2016 ... it has completed a $47.1 million Series ... investors Cormorant Asset Management, Hillhouse Capital Group ... investors Morningside Venture Investments, AJU IB Investment, ... will be used to further advance clinical ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... , Feb. 11, 2016 Stem cells are ... characterized by self-renewal and the capacity to differentiate into ... new discovery, as the first mouse embryonic stem cells ... not until 1995 that the first culturing of embryonic ... cells were not produced until 2006 As a result ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... , Feb. 11, 2016  Governor Andrew M. Cuomo ... create 1,400 jobs throughout Western New York ... with the SUNY Polytechnic Institute, includes a major expansion ... in Buffalo , as well as ... facility in Dunkirk . The combined ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: