Navigation Links
Nanoparticles aid bone growth
Date:6/13/2008

In the first study of its kind, bioengineers and bioscientists at Rice University and Radboud University in Nijmegen, Netherlands, have shown they can grow denser bone tissue by sprinkling stick-like nanoparticles throughout the porous material used to pattern the bone.

The research is available online and slated to appear in the journal Bone. It's the latest breakthrough from the burgeoning field of tissue engineering. The new discipline combines the latest research in materials science and biomedical engineering to produce tissues that can be transplanted without risk of rejection.

To grow new bone, tissue engineers typically place bone cells on porous, biodegradable materials called scaffolds, which act as patterns. With the right chemical and physical cues, the cells can be coaxed into producing new bone. As the scaffold degrades, it is replaced by new bone.

"Ideally, a scaffold should be highly porous, nontoxic and biodegradable, yet strong enough to bear the structural load of the bone that will eventually replace it," said lead researcher Antonios Mikos, Rice's J.W. Cox Professor in Bioengineering, professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering and the director of Rice's Center for Excellence in Tissue Engineering. "Previous research has shown that carbon nanotubes give added strength to polymer scaffolds, but this is the first study to examine the performance of these materials in an animal model."

In the experiments, the researchers implanted two kinds of scaffolds into rabbits. One type was made of a biodegradable plastic called poly(propylene fumarate), or PPF, which has performed well in previous experiments. The second was made of 99.5 percent PPF and 0.5 percent single-walled carbon nanotubes. Nanotubes are about 80,000th the width of a hair. While they are normally about a thousand times longer than they are wide, the researchers used shorter segments that have fared well in prior cytocompatibility studies.

Half the samples were examined four weeks after implantation and half after 12 weeks. While there was no notable difference in performance at four weeks, the nanotube composites exhibited up to threefold greater bone ingrowth after 12 weeks than the PPF. Furthermore, the researchers found the 12-week composite scaffolds contained about two-thirds as much bone tissue as the nearby native bone tissue, while the PPF contained only about one-fifth as much.

Mikos said the nanocomposites performed better than anticipated. In fact, the results indicate that they may go beyond passive guides and take an active role in promoting bone growth.

"We don't yet know the exact mechanism of this enhanced bone formation, but we have intensive studies under way to find out," Mikos said. "It could be related to changes in surface chemistry, strength or other factors."


'/>"/>

Contact: B.J. Almond
balmond@rice.edu
713-348-6770
Rice University
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Magnetic nanoparticles: Suitable for cancer therapy?
2. Brown chemists create cancer-detecting nanoparticles
3. Iowa State University researcher looks to use nanoparticles for food safety
4. Symposium to explore role nanoparticles may play in disease
5. Novel 3-D cell culture model shows selective tumour uptake of nanoparticles
6. Insulet Corporation to Present at the William Blair & Company 28th Annual Growth Stock Conference on June 19, 2008
7. Primary tumors can drive the growth of distant cancers
8. Primary Tumors Fuel Growth of Cancer Cells
9. Cancer-killing viruses influence tumor blood-vessel growth
10. Medco to Present at the William Blair & Company, L.L.C. 28th Annual Growth Conference
11. SAIC to Webcast Presentation at William Blair Growth Stock Conference
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... 05, 2016 , ... Steven Tonkinson, 36, of Coconut Grove, Florida, ran the ... started in 2003. This year, he ran all 26.2 miles with a green 25-pound ... the Miami Heat. , This Sunday, while many are watching the Superbowl, Steven Tonkinson ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... February 05, 2016 , ... The event is being held on April ... in Minneapolis, Minn. Triumph Over Parkinson’s will fund nearly $100,000 for research for the ... lives with Parkinson’s disease and is the architect of this informative event to raise ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... 05, 2016 , ... After years as an active staff surgeon and having ... surgeon Dr. Wayne Carman transitioned to chief of the Division of Plastic Surgery at ... term as chief and began a second three-year term in January of 2016. , ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... February 05, 2016 , ... Regular gym users know ... having to wait longer to access the treadmills. It’s a predictable trend. After the ... lose weight and get in shape by joining gyms, starting new walking or running ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... ... Dr. Justin Scott and Dr. Lydia Muccioli of Pure Dental Health ... in need. The event is scheduled to take place on February 27, 2016 from ... dental care to community members in need. Each patient will be given the opportunity ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/5/2016)... Feb. 5, 2016  ivWatch, a medical devices company, is ... Award granted by Governor Terry McAuliffe,s office. ivWatch ... February 25th at an event to be held at the ... award honors professionals and business that have made significant contributions ... Logo - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160205/330117LOGO ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... Feb. 5, 2016  Patients in Alabama ... ultrasound (HIFU) therapy no longer have to travel out of ... partnership with Urology Centers of Alabama to provide ... procedure for qualifying patients. Alabama ... the treatment of prostate cancer using many different modalities. They ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... Feb. 5, 2016 ... of the "Global Musculoskeletal Partnering 2010-2016: ... profile to their offering. --> ... of the "Global Musculoskeletal Partnering 2010-2016: ... profile to their offering. --> ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: