Navigation Links
NYP/Weill Cornell physician-scientists present latest cancer findings at ASCO meeting
Date:5/31/2008

NEW YORK (May 29, 2008) -- Leading oncologists and cancer researchers at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center are presenting new basic and clinical research findings at the 44th American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting in Chicago, May 30 to June 3.

Highlights from the symposium presentations and posters to be made by NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell physician-scientists include the following:

Phase II trial of 177Lutetium radiolabeled anti-prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) monoclonal antibody J591 in patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. [Abstract number: 5140; Poster number: 13H]

Time: Saturday, May 31. 8:00 a.m. 12:00 p.m.
Authors: S. T. Tagawa, M. I. Milowsky, M. J. Morris, S. Vallabhajosula, S. Goldsmith, D. Matulich, J. Kaplan, F. Berger, H. I. Scher, N. H. Bander, D. M. Nanus

Drs. Scott Tagawa, Neil Bander and their colleagues at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell will present data from a Phase II clinical trial showing that a monoclonal antibody designated "J591," carrying a payload of a radioactive isotope (177Lu), is both safe and effective in the treatment of late-stage metastatic prostate cancer. The antibody works by targeting only prostate cancer cells anywhere in the body while leaving the healthy cells around them unharmed. Patients in this trial had progressing, hormone-independent, metastatic prostate cancer with rapidly increasing prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels. Following only one dose of the J591 antibody loaded with the maximum radiation dose, PSA levels fell in two-thirds of patients with half of all the patients achieving a significant threshold of at least a 30-percent PSA decline. The 30-percent PSA decline threshold has been shown in two large, independent registration trials to be the best PSA surrogate for survival benefit. Additionally, the clinician-scientists found that none of the patients developed symptomatic side effects as a result of the radioactive antibody drug. Currently, two other monoclonal antibodies carrying a radioactive payload are FDA approved, both for the treatment of non-Hodgkins' lymphoma. The researchers are expanding their clinical trials to include earlier stage patients who are more likely to respond, and expanding the trials to other centers around the country.

A phase II study of oral mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor, RAD001 (everolimus), in patients with recurrent endometrial carcinoma (EC).

Oral Presentation; [Abstract number: 5502; Location: S406 (Vista Room)]

Time: Sunday, June 1, 5:30 p.m. 5:45 p.m.
Authors: B. M. Slomovitz, K. H. Lu, T. Johnston, M. Munsell, L. M. Ramondetta, R. R. Broaddus, R. L. Coleman, C. Walker, D. M. Gershenson, T. W. Burke, J. Wolf

Dr. Brian Slomovitz will present results from a Phase II clinical trial (during an oral presentation) showing that the orally administered experimental drug RAD001, a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor, is beneficial in patients with recurrent endometrial cancer. The drug blocks the activity of the mTOR protein within the cytoplasm of cancer cells, responsible for cancer cell proliferation and growth. The physician-scientists found that the drug slowed cancer progression in 44 percent of subjects in the study. The study was conducted in collaboration with the MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Preoperative treatment with pazopanib (GW786034), a multikinase angiogenesis inhibitor in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): A proof-of-concept phase II study. [Abstract number: 7557; Poster number 34G]

Time: Sunday, June 1, 2:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m.
Authors: N. Altorki, M. Guarino, P. Lee, H. I. Pass, E. Filip, T. Bauer, D. Roychowdhury, T. Zaks, L. Ottesen, D. Yankelevitz

Dr. Nasser Altorki will present final data from a Phase II clinical trial showing that a drug that stops blood vessel growth (angiogenesis) to tumors is safe and highly effective for the treatment of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. Pazopanib works by blocking the action of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR)-1, -2 and -3, c-kit and platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGF-R), which both work by growing bloods vessels that supply nutrition to tumors. Prior to surgery to remove their tumors, 87 percent of the 26 subjects tested had a significant reduction in tumor growth.

Palonosetron (PALO) for prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in patients receiving high-dose melphalan prior to stem cell transplant (SCT). [Abstract number: 9617; Poster number 47B]

Time: Saturday, May 31, 2:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m
Authors: S. Giralt, K. Mangan, R. Maziarz, J. S. Bubalo, R. Beveridge, D. D. Hurd, F. Mendoza, E. B. Rubenstein, T. J. DeGroot, M. W. Schuster

Principal investigator Dr. Michael Schuster's multicenter trial group will present findings from a Phase II clinical trial showing that a new drug called Palonosetron (PALO) is safe and effective at reducing vomiting and nausea -- common side effects of chemotherapy -- in multiple myeloma patients undergoing multi-day high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation. All of the subjects studied were taking a common chemotherapy agent called melphalan at the time of the study. The researchers found that those who were on multiple daily doses of PALO reported fewer incidences of vomiting and nausea.

LE-SN38 for metastatic colorectal cancer after progression on oxaliplatin: Results of CALGB 80402. [Abstract number: 4109; Poster number: 16A]

Time: Monday, June 2, 8:00 a.m. 12:00 p.m.
Authors: A. J. Ocean, D. Niedzwiecki, J. N. Atkins, B. Parker, B. H. O'Neil, J. W. Lee, S. Wadler, R. M. Goldberg

Dr. Allyson Ocean will present data showing that LESN-38, the active molecule of the chemotherapy drug irinotecan, did not have benefit in slowing the progression of metastatic colorectal cancer. The drug was reformulated and packaged into a liposome, a spherical molecule resembling a bubble made from lipid (fat) molecules, for delivery into the body, with the hope of reducing common side effects of chemotherapy. However, while the results for reduced toxicity are promising, the findings show that the drug did not slow cancer progression at the dose and formulation tested in this trial.


'/>"/>

Contact: Andrew Klein
ank2017@med.cornell.edu
212-821-0560
New York- Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center/Weill Cornell Medical College
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. NYP/Weill Cornell gene therapy clinical trial yields promising results for Batten disease
2. NIH selects Weill Cornell Medical College to lead new NYC translational research collaboration
3. Healthy restaurants help make us fat, says a new Cornell study
4. The latest about male infertility and testosterone from NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell
5. White House awards Weill Cornells Bruce McCandliss highest honor for early career scientists
6. Weill Cornell receives $2.4 million in grants from Gates Foundation to fight tuberculosis
7. NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell creates world-class cancer center
8. By color-coding atoms, new Cornell electron microscope promises big advance in materials analysis
9. $50 million gift to NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center
10. Weill Cornell team identifies potential new drug targets against hormone-dependent breast cancer
11. Weill Cornell receives funding to study creation of new elder abuse center
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/11/2016)... ... ... Be Well Medical Group (Be Well) is pleased to announce ... South Columbus St, Suite 201, Alexandria, VA. Be Well Medical Group is a concierge ... of their homes, offices or at the practices’ local office. It is also one ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... ... ... The book, “Computers Should Just Work!”, provides a basic, non-techie education on how ... signing a contract and how to spot an incompetent or dishonest IT person before ... and technology, it’s more important than ever to make sure the company you outsource ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... 10, 2016 , ... Sherly Sulaiman, certified clinical hypnotherapist and ... sessions to help Los Angeles-area actors cope with rejection, improve their auditions, and ... as “Mindfulness for Actors and Artists,” has been featured in Daily Actor ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... , ... February 10, 2016 , ... ... is unveiling its revolutionary new 2.0 version at the International Roofing Expo in ... the power of the world's most advanced weather technology in the hands of ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... 2016 , ... The Wickman Agency in Garland, TX has ... community. Pledging to select a new beneficiary every 60 days, the agency will ... is to bring community awareness to important local causes by forming campaigns which ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/10/2016)... A Worldwide Clinical Trials expert will ... Victoria Park Plaza in London , 24-25 ... and future advances for late phase research on Wednesday, 24 ... , associate director of project management at Worldwide, will focus ... regulations and standards in late phase research. ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... 10, 2016  The Baylor University ... an in-kind gift from Christie Medical ... vein finder for the nursing school simulation ... they learn how to start an IV ... technique. ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... ATLANTA , Feb. 10, 2016  LexisNexis® ... and technology, today announced the launch of ... analytics solution that helps improve and optimize the ... evaluation of performance using severity-adjusted scores. By measuring ... a critical solution to deliver better outcomes, improve ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: