Navigation Links
NIST calibration tools to encourage use of novel medical imaging technique
Date:12/6/2013

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has developed prototype calibration tools for an experimental medical imaging technique that offers new advantages in diagnosing and monitoring of certain cancers and possibly other medical conditions.*

NIST designed, constructed and tested two prototype phantoms for calibrating ultralow-field (ULF) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems. Phantoms are widely used tools for quality control in medical imaging. They are generally objects with simple shapes but very well-defined responses to a specific type of imaging scanner. As their name implies, phantoms are stand-ins for the body, and are used to help optimize MRI machines to deliver the best possible medical images for a given type of tissue.

The NIST prototypes are the first standard calibration tools for ULF-MRI, offering a quantitative means to assess performance, validate the technique, and directly compare different experimental and clinical MRI scanners.

"Tissues that may look the same in clinical MRI can look very different in ULF-MRI, which provides new contrast mechanisms," NIST physicist Michael Boss says. "Our hope is that we can move this technique along to attract more interest from [industry] vendors."

MRI noninvasively images soft tissues based on measurements of how hydrogen nucleiin the water that makes up much of the bodyrespond to magnetic fields. ULF-MRI enhances tissue contrast in particular types of MRI scans. Prostate tumors, for example, can be difficult to see with conventional MRI but show up clearly under ULF-MRI. ULF-MRI has also been used experimentally to image the brain, and tested in at least one nonmedical application, inspection of liquids at airports.

ULF-MRI also offers practical advantages: The instruments are simpler in design, lighter in weight and less expensive than regular MRI scanners. That's because ULF-MRI operates at much lower magnetic field strengths, measured in microteslas, thousands of times lower than conventional MRI, which operates at up to 3 teslas and requires huge magnets. The low magnetic field strength means ULF-MRI needs the most sensitive magnetometers available: SQUIDs (superconducting quantum interference devices). This is convenient because it makes ULF-MRI suitable for combining with other SQUID-based imaging techniques such as magnetoencephalography.

NIST staff previously designed phantoms for conventional MRI systems** and also have extensive experience both making and using SQUIDs. NIST's new ULF-MRI phantoms are short plastic cylinders, shaped like hockey pucks but a bit smaller, containing six or 10 plastic jars filled with various salt solutions that become magnetized in a magnetic field. Each phantom measures a different aspect of scanner performance such as spatial resolution. NIST researchers tested the new phantoms on both a conventional MRI system at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center (Denver, Colo.) and an experimental ULF-MRI scanner at the University of California (UC) at Berkeley, where the technique was first demonstrated about a decade ago.

Tests results show the prototype phantoms are well-matched to ULF-MRI applications and allow direct comparison of ULF and clinical MRI system performance. NIST researchers now plan to incorporate design improvements based on lessons learned from the prototypes, with the aim of improving phantom stability and providing traceability to standard measurement units. NIST and UC Berkeley researchers also plan to work together to further develop ULF-MRI technology for detection of prostate and breast cancers.

NIST's phantoms for conventional MRI systems are currently being tested by hospitals and MRI manufacturers, and Sigma-K Corp. (Durham, N.C.) is developing methods for making copies for more widespread distribution under a NIST SBIR award.***


'/>"/>

Contact: Laura Ost
laura.ost@nist.gov
303-497-4880
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. Matakina Launches Volumetric Breast Imaging Tools Built upon Globally Used, Multi-Vendor VolparaDensity Volumetric Breast Density Software
2. Tools4ever Creates New Connector between UMRA and Zendesk
3. Zero-Day Attacks Among the Most Costly and Feared Hacker Tools for a Reason
4. New statistical tools being developed for mining cancer data
5. Marci Lock - a Leader in Effective Workout Systems - Offers New Packages That Offer Four Motivational Tools for the Price of One
6. Tools4ever Exhibits at Identity Management 2013
7. Electronic and Internet health tools may decrease in-person physician visits
8. Patients “Self-Refer” To Practices With Health Care Transparency Tools
9. Tools4ever’s Identity and Access Management Solutions Implemented at Additional Businesses Across the United States
10. Tools4ever Identity and Access Management Solutions Implemented at Several Healthcare Facilities
11. Tools4ever Announces a New Connection Between UMRA, Cisco Call Manager and Cisco Unity Unified Communications Systems
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
NIST calibration tools to encourage use of novel medical imaging technique
(Date:5/24/2016)... Linda, CA (PRWEB) , ... May 24, 2016 ... ... fluorescent cell imaging; high content imaging; multiplex immunoassays are widely used for cell ... important for labs to maximize their quality and efficiency in these areas. , ...
(Date:5/23/2016)... ... 23, 2016 , ... On the occasion of his 25th Anniversary of changing ... loss process: , New patients have a consultation and evaluation (done by Dr. Ferdico ... , Body Composition Analysis, There are 15 things that each patient gets checked for, ...
(Date:5/23/2016)... ... 23, 2016 , ... According to an article published May 11th ... birth of her son, Rockwell Lloyd Liu, and notes that gestational surrogacy helped make ... Bill” star explains that, as a career oriented single woman, gestational surrogacy made parenthood ...
(Date:5/23/2016)... ... May 23, 2016 , ... NYDNRehab, a New York City-based ... athletes. This is the first time this type of technology, which was developed by ... to the public in New York. , With over 10 million sport injuries ...
(Date:5/23/2016)... ... May 23, 2016 , ... California State University Northridge ... quality of life and is currently focusing on ways to improve how people ... tested through research to find out whether watching them could have a significant ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/19/2016)... SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. , May 19, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... a biopharmaceutical company developing novel therapeutics for the treatment ... announced that new GBT440 data will be presented in ... 21 st Congress in Copenhagen ... ongoing Phase 1/2 GBT440-001 study in sickle cell disease ...
(Date:5/19/2016)... 2016 BioLineRx Ltd. (NASDAQ/TASE: BLRX) ... treatment of multiple cancer and hematological indications, will be ... abstract titled " Clinical response in relapsed/refractory AML patients ... BL-8040, a potent CXCR4 antagonist; results of a Phase ... at the European Hematology Association 21st Congress, to be ...
(Date:5/19/2016)... CAMBRIDGE, Massachusetts , May 19, 2016 ... pharmaceuticals and diagnostics based on the gut microbiome, is pleased ... Cambridge, MA to support its operations ... office is located at Kendall Square, the heart of ... global hub for transforming scientific insights into new drugs. The ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: