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NEWSWEEK: Cover: Giving Globally: How to Heal the World
Date:9/23/2007

Bill Gates on Fighting Diseases Like Malaria and Tuberculosis: 'The

Evidence is in: These Problems can be Solved' 'I'm Now More Convinced Than Ever That we Can Create a Healthier World for

Everyone'

Newsweek Profiles Four Innovators Working to Bring Vaccines to the Developing World, Beating Science, Logistics and Financing Challenges

NEW YORK, Sept. 23 /PRNewswire/ -- Microsoft cofounder Bill Gates writes in the current issue of Newsweek that progress is being made in worldwide health initiatives for developing countries, with governments, aid groups and communities "simply refusing to accept the notion that diseases like malaria and tuberculosis will haunt us forever. The evidence is in: these problems can be solved."

(Photo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20070923/NYSU001 )

Gates' essay is part of the October 1 Newsweek cover "Giving Globally: How to Heal The World" (on newsstands Monday, September 24). "I believe we stand at a moment of unequaled opportunity," he writes. "Governments must now step up to the plate with more money-wisely targeted-to expand effective global health programs to reach all those in need. Businesses, community groups and individuals all play a role as well ... I'm now more convinced than ever that we can create a healthier world for everyone."

In the cover package, General Editor Mary Carmichael profiles four innovators who are working to bring lifesaving vaccines to children around the world. When it comes to immunization, much of the developing world is still stuck in the 18th century. In vast parts of rural Africa, Asia and Latin America, kids don't get any of the basic vaccines available in developed countries; they die because of that fact. And no one anywhere gets routinely and effectively immunized against the big global killers-HIV, tuberculosis and malaria, which together take 6 million lives each year-because, even with all the technological prowess of modern medicine, good vaccines for those diseases do not exist, Carmichael reports.

The four who are trying to make a difference: Dr. Fred Binka, a doctor who's making it easier to do high-tech science in low-tech environments; Emilio Emini, a biologist who has spent 23 years fighting HIV; David Edwards, a biomedical engineer at Harvard University who thinks patients can ward off disease with a cheap inhalable powder, and Christopher Egerton-Warburton, a banker who has improved the health of poor people by getting rich people to invest in bonds.

Also in the cover package:

-- Tokyo Bureau Chief Christian Caryl writes about new programs all over

the world that are rediscovering and proving the usefulness of

"primitive" water systems such as Chinese foot pumps, buried aqueducts

and other ancient water-supply technologies. While the older systems

may never entirely supplant modern, mechanized solutions, they can

prove more effective and sustainable in many cases, Caryl reports.

-- Senior Editor Steven Levy reports that One Laptop Per Child, the as-

yet-unproven project to deliver millions of cheap computers to kids in

developing countries, is finally rolling out its innovative XO devices

(which are manufactured not at the promised $100 price point but $188).

The problem is getting someone to buy them for the kids who need them,

Levy says. One Laptop Per Child has made a major change to its business

plan. They are accepting $200 online donations to buy a laptop for a

child. Benefactors can also get a computer for themselves with the

"Give 1 Get 1" option allowing them to purchase a laptop for $399, a

price that includes a second one to be delivered to a kid who may use

it to do something great, Levy reports.

-- Special Correspondent Emily Flynn Vencat profiles Sudanese businessman

and billionaire Mo Ibrahim, who will soon announce the first winner of

his foundation's Achievement in African Leadership Prize, a $5 million

award, spread out over 10 years-and $200,000 per year beyond that,

until death-given to African leaders (only democratically elected sub-

Saharan leaders can qualify) who rule responsibly with no clouds over

their tenure. Vencat writes that Ibrahim hopes the prize has the

potential to make political office a more appealing choice for Africa's

brightest young minds, who will see prestige and money as the rewards

for good politicians. "I believe that us business people who have made

money in Africa have a responsibility to help bring good governance

there," he tells Newsweek.

(Read complete cover story at http://www.Newsweek.com)

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/20911841/site/newsweek/ - Cover Story

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/20920343/site/newsweek/ - Bill Gates: Saving the World Is Within Our Grasp


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SOURCE Newsweek
Copyright©2007 PR Newswire.
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