Navigation Links
NCAA mandatory sickle cell screening program not enough to save athletes' lives

In response to a lawsuit after a college football player died from complications due to sickle cell trait (SCT) during a workout, the NCAA implemented mandatory SCT screening of all Division I student-athletes.

A new study evaluated the impact of that policy and found that testing alone will help identify more than 2,000 athletes with SCT, but warns that screening alone will not prevent death.

"Although the policy is well-intentioned, screening is just the first step," says Beth A. Tarini, M.D., M.S., lead author of the study and assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases at the University of Michigan. "In addition to educating athletes and staff, precautionary measures need to be strictly enforced."

Tarini and her co-authors, M. Alison Brooks, M.D., a pediatric sports medicine physician at the University of Wisconsin, and David G. Bundy, M.D., an assistant professor of pediatrics with expertise in sickle cell disease at Johns Hopkins University, found that without a strictly enforced intervention, approximately seven NCAA Division I athletes would die suddenly as a complication of SCT during a 10-year period.

"In the end, enforcing safe training measures to protect all NCAA student-athletesnot just those in Division Ifrom sudden death related to SCT will benefit all athletes," says Tarini. "That's a win-win situation from a policy perspective."

The association between SCT and overexertion was first identified by the U.S. military in the 1970s. Instead of implementing a universal screening policy, the military enforced a universal intervention program and was successful in preventing all subsequent sudden death in recruits with SCT.

Tarini, Brooks, and Bundy found that the NCAA screening program requires that 144,181 student-athletes from a four-year cohort would need to be screened to prevent one deathassuming 100 percent intervention and would cost somewhere between $1.4 and $3 million. A universal intervention policy like the one implemented in the U.S. military could prevent all deaths associated with SCT and overexertion as well as death among other athletes from other life-threatening complications like cardiovascular conditions.

"The culture in sports to push ourselves dangerously beyond our limits is powerful," says Tarini. "Implementing policies to identify those at risk provides a false sense of security if we aren't diligent about monitoring and protecting the health and safety of our student-athletes."

Tarini and colleagues analyzed NCAA reports, population-based SCT prevalence estimates, and published risks for exercise-related sudden deaths. They used these to estimate the number of sickle cell carriers and the number of potentially preventable deaths with mandatory SCT screening of NCAA Division I athletes. Using the most recently published, publicly available NCAA participation rates from academic year 2007�, they estimated the number of Division I athletes in a four-year cohort to be 81,073 males and 63,108 females.


Contact: Lauren McLeod
University of Michigan Health System

Related medicine news :

1. Nations leading ID experts call for mandatory flu vaccine for all health-care personnel
2. Frances national program to reduce HAIs reports important successes; uses mandatory reporting
3. Adult Sickle Cell Drug May Benefit Kids, Too
4. Study probes genetic link to sickle cell pain management
5. Sickle Cell Disease Tied to Silent Strokes in Children
6. Study identifies silent stroke risk factors for children with sickle cell anemia
7. Researchers reveal potential treatment for sickle cell disease
8. Correcting sickle cell disease with stem cells
9. Sickle cell trait is not risk factor for kidney disease
10. Schools failing pupils with sickle cell disease
11. Nitric oxide impacts source of sickle cell pain crisis
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... , ... On November 23rd 2015 Cozy Products, a division of ... Cozy Products explains what this means for business moving forward. , The Tri Lite ... business model: to sell personal heaters that reduce energy consumption, are economical and keep ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... November 25, 2015 , ... Brillianteen, McGaw YMCA’s ... learning in its 65th Anniversary Brillianteen Revue, scheduled for March 4-6, 2016. Auditions ... 65 years, Brillianteen has been a treasured tradition for numerous families in the ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... Missouri (PRWEB) , ... November 25, 2015 , ... ... HEAL, will provide scholarships for people struggling with eating disorders as a result ... from the second annual event, held at Fox Run Golf Club in Eureka, ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... November 25, 2015 , ... An unlikely ... resulting in a way for homeless people to have a more dignified and ... new initiative whereby they are repurposing plastic bags into sleeping mats for the ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... November 25, 2015 , ... Students and parents have something to be thankful ... Create Real Impact awards. California Casualty is proud to support the contest ... distracted and reckless driving, the number one killer of young drivers. , Almost ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/25/2015)... Nov. 25, 2015  Trovagene, Inc. (NASDAQ: TROV ... that Chief Executive Officer Antonius Schuh, Ph.D., is scheduled ... Annual Piper Jaffray Healthcare Conference. th ... York Palace Hotel in New York ... EST. Mr. Schuh will be available for one-on-one meetings ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... Nov. 25, 2015 USP 800 applies ... preparations (e.g. pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, nurses, physicians, physician ... The chapter also covers all entities which store, ... hospitals, other healthcare institutions, patient treatment clinics, physicians, ... --> --> What is the ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... , November 25, 2015 Developmental, commercial, ... role in boosting the profitability of pharmaceutical products, ... commercial, and regulatory/legal strategies all play a ... says GBI Research . --> ... play a key role in boosting the profitability of pharmaceutical products, ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: