Navigation Links
Muscle Training May Benefit Chronic Heart Failure Patients

TUESDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- People with chronic heart failure can improve their ability to exercise by focusing their training on their small muscles, researchers say.

This type of isolated workout can also boost oxygen flow and improve patients' quality of life, according to the report published online Sept. 13 and in the Sept. 20 print issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

In conducting the study, researchers from Italy and the United States gave 12 men an eight-week program of isolated, small muscle (knee-extensions) and whole-body (cycling) exercises. Six of the men had chronic heart failure; the rest did not.

The investigators examined the men's muscle structure, oxygen transport and metabolism both before and after they completed the program, and compared the findings of those with chronic heart failure to those without the heart condition.

Following the initial program, the men with heart failure completed another eight-week small muscle exercise regimen so the researchers could compare how their results had changed.

The study showed that cardiac output during the small muscle exercise was similar among all the participants both before and after the eight weeks of training. There was a change, however, in oxygen transport.

Before the training, the maximum amount of oxygen delivered to the leg muscles was significantly lower in the men with chronic heart failure. Once they completed the eight-week program, the amount of oxygen delivered to their leg muscles surged by roughly 54 percent, the same level as the men without heart failure, the study authors reported.

The leg oxygen consumption of the men with heart failure was also significantly higher than the other men, rising by about 53 percent after the training. The researchers attributed this to better blood flow redistribution.

Lead study author Dr. Fabio Esposito, of the University of Milan, pointed out in a news release from the American College of Cardiology that the study results "indicate that the skeletal muscle of patients with chronic heart failure still has the potential to adapt in the expected fashion, if given the appropriate stimuli."

The findings could help medical professionals develop better treatment and rehab strategies for patients with chronic heart failure, the team concluded.

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more about heart failure.

-- Mary Elizabeth Dallas

SOURCE: American College of Cardiology, news release, Sept. 12, 2011

Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Study shows balloon pump use prior to angioplasty does not reduce heart muscle damage
2. Study finds popular muscle-boosting supplement does not increase blood flow
3. Building Muscle May Reduce Diabetes Risk, Study Says
4. Vitamin D relieves joint, muscle pain for breast cancer patients
5. Study finds important risk factors for death/transplantation in children with heart muscle disease
6. When injured muscles mistakenly grow bones
7. Older Adults Have to Exercise More to Maintain Muscle Size, Study Finds
8. Vitamin D lower in NFL football players who suffered muscled injuries, study reports
9. From body builders to baby boomers: IFT session explores protein recommendations beyond muscle
10. Apples Help Keep Muscles Strong, Mouse Study Finds
11. Protein drinks after exercise help maintain aging muscles
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
Muscle Training May Benefit Chronic Heart Failure Patients
(Date:11/30/2015)... Madeira Beach, FL (PRWEB) , ... November 30, ... ... issue of Consumer Reports magazine, quoted Michael Hansen, Ph.D., a senior scientist at ... exposure, and even more so for a child’s exposure limits. , The original ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... November 30, 2015 , ... Medicalis, a ... Radiology Society of North America (RSNA) annual meeting, being held November 29 – ... 2014. Throughout 2015, the company has completed installations for Integrated Delivery Network ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... ... It’s inevitable that everyone will experience death in his or her lifetime. ... lives among us. It is your perspective, however, that determines how you view death ... T Sky understands that she may see death more frequently than most. As she ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... ... The successful filing of an Investigational New Drug application (IND) is a ... key industry segment, Regis Technologies has decided to sponsor and participate in an XTalks-hosted ... , Federal law does not allow new drugs to cross state lines until it ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... ... Scott Newman MD, FACS of New York’s Advanced Plastic ... the New York City area to utilize the new, non-invasive SculpSure™ Laser System ... for fat loss in the abdomen, flanks, and other areas that is completely ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/30/2015)... 30, 2015  PTS Diagnostics, the U.S.-based manufacturer of ... analyzers, A1CNow ® systems, and PTS Detect™ cotinine ... patents that will propel the company into the mHealth ... Europe . The technology is a system ... on smartphones and tablets, and uses test strip technology ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... NASHUA, N.H. , Nov. 30, 2015 /PRNewswire/ ... today that it will feature its latest solutions ... the early identification of cancer at the Radiological ... in Chicago from November ... showcase recent product advances including iReveal®, an automated ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... -- Hanger, Inc. (NYSE: HGR ) (the "Company") today ... its previously announced consent solicitation (as amended and restated, ... amount 7⅛% Senior Notes due 2018 (the "Notes") to ... pursuant to the Consent Solicitation, (ii) the proposed increased ... date of the Consent Solicitation.    ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: