Navigation Links
Multiple thought channels may help brain avoid traffic jams
Date:5/6/2012

Brain networks may avoid traffic jams at their busiest intersections by communicating on different frequencies, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, the University Medical Center at Hamburg-Eppendorf and the University of Tbingen have learned.

"Many neurological and psychiatric conditions are likely to involve problems with signaling in brain networks," says co-author Maurizio Corbetta, MD, the Norman J. Stupp Professor of Neurology at Washington University. "Examining the temporal structure of brain activity from this perspective may be especially helpful in understanding psychiatric conditions like depression and schizophrenia, where structural markers are scarce."

The research will be published May 6 in Nature Neuroscience.

Scientists usually study brain networks areas of the brain that regularly work together using magnetic resonance imaging, which tracks blood flow. They assume that an increase in blood flow to part of the brain indicates increased activity in the brain cells of that region.

"Magnetic resonance imaging is a useful tool, but it does have limitations," Corbetta says. "It only allows us to track brain cell activity indirectly, and it is unable to track activity that occurs at frequencies greater than 0.1 hertz, or once every 10 seconds. We know that some signals in the brain can cycle as high as 500 hertz, or 500 times per second."

For the new study, conducted at the University Medical Center at Hamburg-Eppendorf, the researchers used a technique called magnetoencephalography (MEG) to analyze brain activity in 43 healthy volunteers. MEG detects very small changes in magnetic fields in the brain that are caused by many cells being active at once. It can detect these signals at rates up to 100 hertz.

"We found that different brain networks ticked at different frequencies, like clocks ticking at different speeds," says lead author Joerg Hipp, PhD, of the University Medical Center at Hamburg-Eppendorf and the University of Tbingen, both in Germany.

For example, networks that included the hippocampus, a brain area critical for memory formation, tended to be active at frequencies around 5 hertz. Networks constituting areas involved in the senses and movement were active between 32 hertz and 45 hertz. Many other brain networks were active at frequencies between eight and 32 hertz. These "time-dependent" networks resemble different airline route maps, overlapping but each ticking at a different rate.

"There have been a number of fMRI studies of depression and schizophrenia showing 'spatial' changes in the organization of brain networks," Corbettta says. "MEG studies provide a window into a much richer 'temporal' structure. In the future, this might offer new diagnostic tests or ways to monitor the efficacy of interventions in these debilitating mental conditions."


'/>"/>

Contact: Diane Duke Williams
williamsdia@wustl.edu
314-286-0111
Washington University School of Medicine
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Low-dose whole-body CT finds disease missed on standard imaging for patients with multiple myeloma
2. Kessler Foundation scientist awarded $554,000 for multiple sclerosis employment research
3. Fish Oil Supplements Wont Help in Multiple Sclerosis: Study
4. Experimental Pill for Multiple Sclerosis Shows Promise
5. Scientists uncover multiple faces of deadly breast cancer
6. Study shows colorectal cancer screening rates high in patients with multiple health problems
7. Experimental Pill May Ease Multiple Sclerosis Disability
8. HIV/AIDS vaccine shows long-term protection against multiple exposures in non-human primates
9. Hyperactivity in brain may explain multiple symptoms of depression
10. Young children exposed to anesthesia multiple times show elevated rates of ADHD
11. A single therapy slows multiple cancers
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:10/13/2017)... , ... October 13, 2017 , ... Many families have ... many long-term care insurance companies have a waiver for care if the client has ... period, when the family pays for care, is often waived, so the benefits from ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... Global Healthcare Management’s 4th Annual Kids Fun Run ... This free event, sponsored by Global Healthcare Management’s CEO, Jon Letko, is aimed ... geared towards children of all ages; it is a non-competitive, non-timed event, which is ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... ... Software Development, has been awarded a contract by the Center for Medicare and ... aims to accelerate the enterprise use of Agile methodologies in a consistent and ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... First Healthcare ... program management, will showcase a range of technology and learning solutions at the ... Convention and Expo to be held October 14–18, 2017 at the Mandalay Bay ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... Wis. (PRWEB) , ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... standard products to meet the demand of today’s consumer and regulatory authorities worldwide. ... of probiotic experts and tested to meet the highest standard. , These ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/2/2017)... 2, 2017  AllianceRx Walgreens Prime, the combined central ... and pharmacy benefit manager Prime Therapeutics LLC (Prime), today ... included the unveiling of new signage at its headquarters ... as at a few other company-owned facilities across the ... patients, some of whom will begin to see the ...
(Date:10/2/2017)... The Rebound mobile app is poised to become ... tide of prescription drug addiction. The app empowers users to ... stepping down their dosage in a safe, controlled manner while ... the first 100,000 people to sign up will enjoy 3 ... ...
(Date:9/28/2017)... , Sept. 28, 2017 Cohen Veterans Bioscience ... the use of wearable and home sensors for real-time ... Early Signal Foundation, a nonprofit organization focused on disruptive ... provide an affordable analytical system to record and integrate ... ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: