Navigation Links
Mouse study: Real-time imaging device may improve surgery for congenital colon disease
Date:2/29/2008

LOS ANGELES (Feb. 29, 2008) Researchers at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center are developing a spectral imaging system that could result in shorter operating times for infants undergoing surgery for Hirschsprungs disease, according to a mouse study reported in the Journal of Biophotonics.

The study documents that in addition to its diagnostic potential, spectral imaging may provide an optical biopsy, allowing precise localization of a needed intervention.

Spectral imaging is based on the fact that light reflected from a target can be captured and measured by highly sensitive equipment to develop a characteristic signature based on wavelength. In this study, the colon tissue of six mice with the equivalent of Hirschsprungs disease was analyzed and compared to that of controls. With repeated measurements and calculations, unique signatures for normal tissue and for diseased tissue emerged.

Spectral imaging does not detect the presence or absence of ganglion cells themselves. Instead, the spectral signature reflects differences in the composition of normal and diseased tissue.

As a result of this study in laboratory mice, human clinical trials will be planned, providing spectral imaging for intraoperative decision-making in Hirschsprung's disease, a congenital condition affecting nerve cells of the large intestine. The technology, developed at Cedars-Sinais Minimally Invasive Surgical Technologies Institute (MISTI) is adaptable to other types of surgery.

Hirschsprungs usually affects specialized nerve (ganglion) cells in the lower portion of the large intestine, although the entire colon can be involved. Ganglion cells normally stimulate smooth muscle of the intestinal wall to push stool through the colon, but in sections where ganglia are missing (aganglionosis) the process comes to a halt, causing severe constipation that can lead to obstruction, massive infection and even death.

Estimated to affect one in 5,000 babies, the disease can be treated in a minimally invasive surgical procedure that removes the diseased portion of the colon and attaches the healthy colon to the anus. One of the critical portions of the operation is the accurate and precise determination of the point at which normal colon ends and disease begins. If too little colon is removed, the patient is likely to continue to develop significant constipation, but if too much is removed, chronic diarrhea may result, which can lead to other major health problems.

The location and length of the transition zone between healthy and abnormal tissue varies considerably in Hirschsprungs disease patients and must be precisely identified to properly perform the operation, said Philip K. Frykman, M.D., Ph.D., Associate Director of Pediatric Surgery at Cedars Sinai and first author of the article. The determination is routinely done by taking a number of small samples from the colon wall and sending them to the lab where a pathologist looks for the presence or absence of ganglion cells and other features. But this process may take 45 to 60 minutes, during which the operation is essentially on hold and the patient remains under general anesthesia.

Spectral imaging, on the other hand, could provide immediate results, increasing patient safety and operating room efficiency, added Frykman, who specializes in minimally invasive surgery for infants and children and holds a research grant from Cedars-Sinai to study Hirschsprungs disease.

There is a financial factor, too. Reducing time in the operating room could make a difference of several thousand dollars.

The images showed a clear distinction, and this was confirmed by pathological analysis. Based on our results, it appears that spectral imaging methods could be used during operations, in real time, to help surgeons distinguish normal from abnormal tissue, without requiring traditional biopsy, said Daniel L. Farkas, Ph.D., vice-chairman for research in the Department of Surgery, director of the Minimally Invasive Surgical Technologies Institute, and senior author of the journal article.

Biophotonics the interdisciplinary field dealing with interactions between biological entities and photons, basic units of light is an emerging research area, with translational potential. Although spectral imaging and other photonic technologies have been used in advanced applications such as satellite reconnaissance for many years, only very recently have scientists begun translating these approaches into biological and medical uses.

At Cedars-Sinai and a few biophotonic research centers in the United States and Europe, spectral imaging is being studied for possible use in a variety of surgical situations. For each potential application, newly developed devices, software and criteria are evaluated in animal studies to show "proof of concept" before human clinical trials are launched.


'/>"/>

Contact: Sandy Van
sandy@prpacific.com
800-880-2397
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Effectiveness of mouse breeds that mimic Alzheimers disease symptoms questioned
2. Mouse vision has a rhythm all its own
3. Mouse Study Gives Clues to Colitis
4. Mouse mammary tumor virus can replicate in human cells
5. A longer-living, healthier mouse that could hold clues to human aging
6. Gene Tweak Reverses Aging in Mouse Skin Cells
7. Mouse Model of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Developed
8. Seal Shield Introduces New Silver Seal Washable, Antimicrobial Mouse at HiMSS Healthcare Symposium
9. U of M study: Early treatment can reverse heart damage
10. New study: Pine bark reduces perimenopausal symptoms
11. U of M study: Health food supplement may curb addiction of pathological gamblers
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/24/2016)... Irvine, CA — , ... ... the appointment of three new members of its Advisory Board. ... Chico and Sarah Kusch. “All three of them embody the mission ... team. We are very fortunate to have them as we continue ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... ... May 24, 2016 , ... Boyd Industries, a leading supplier of ... a groundbreaking new product for pediatric dentistry , at AAPD 2016, the annual ... TX May 26-29. The Concealed Delivery Unit keeps dental hand pieces and other anxiety-provoking ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... ... May 24, 2016 , ... Eggsurance, the first ... relaunch of its community and education hub for women considering fertility preservation, as ... create a safe and welcoming place for women to find cycle buddies, get ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... ... May 24, 2016 , ... American Gene Technologies ... to its board of directors. Otterstatter is co-founder, president and CEO of ... technological innovations that lead to broad-based healthcare solutions. , “Jon knows how to ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... ... May 24, 2016 , ... Bio-Logic Aqua® Research Water Life ... and a trainer for Ageless Grace ( http://www.agelessgrace.com ) to discuss healthier lifestyles, ... 16, 2016. , Formerly a Northwestern University Literature Professor, Kinst gravitated to her ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/24/2016)... as senior vice president of sales, announced Andrea Heslin Smiley , VMS president ... business development and sales team, exploring new opportunities for VMS to empower patients and ... ... ... ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... Open Access Journal Focusing ... Elsevier , a world-leading provider of scientific, ... the launch of Clinical Neurophysiology ... on clinical practice issues in clinical neurophysiology. The journal ... values and didactic reviews. It is an official journal ...
(Date:5/23/2016)... 2016 Global Paclitaxel Market 2016 ... 12 companies and the Paclitaxel analysis in this study ... industry and its players. This is the ... details the current state of the industry while providing ... applications and industry chain structure. The Paclitaxel market analysis ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: