Navigation Links
Mouse model confirms mutated protein's role in dementia
Date:11/2/2010

A team of scientists from Japan and the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have created a new mouse model that confirms that mutations of a protein called beta-synuclein promote neurodegeneration. The discovery creates a potential new target for developing treatments of diseases like Parkinson's and Alzheimer's.

The work is published in today's issue of Nature Communications. Lead author is Makoto Hashimoto of the Division of Chemistry and Metabolism, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute for Neuroscience, with colleagues including Eliezer Masliah, MD, professor of neurosciences and pathology in the UC San Diego School of Medicine, Edward Rockenstein, a research associate in UCSD's Experimental Neuropath Laboratory and Albert R. La Spada, MD, PhD, professor of cellular and molecular medicine, chief of the Division of Genetics in the Department of Pediatrics and associate director of the Institute for Genomic Medicine at UC San Diego.

In 2004, La Spada discovered mutations in a family afflicted with a neurological disorder known as Dementia with Lewy Bodies. DLB is one of the most common types of progressive dementia, combining features of both Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Lewy bodies are abnormal aggregates of proteins. There are no known therapies to stop or slow the DLB's progression. There is no cure.

In the 2004 study, La Spada and colleagues found that mutations of the naturally occurring B-synuclein protein in DLB patients "were strong strongly suggestive of being pathogenic." That is, the mutated protein caused or was a cause of the disease. But the findings were not definitive.

The newly published research describes the creation of a transgenic mouse model that expresses the B-synuclein mutation. The mice suffer from neurodegenerative disease, validating La Spada's earlier work.

"Beta-synuclein is interesting because it is closely related to alpha-synuclein, a protein that can cause Parkinson's disease by being mutated or over-expressed," said La Spada. "A-synuclein is viewed as central to Parkinson's disease pathogenesis. The question has been: could B-synuclein also promote neurodegeneration because it's similar in its sequence and expression pattern to A-synuclein? This study shows that the answer is yes."

These findings, said La Spada, establish B-synuclein's links to Parkinson's disease and related disorders, making it a new and, now, proven target for potential therapies.


'/>"/>

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. Rapamycin rescues learning, memory in Alzheimers mouse model
2. NIA researchers find gene to explain mouse embryonic stem cell immortality
3. Dxtra Introduces New Solid Stainless Steel Mouse Pad
4. UCSF Transgenic Mouse Mimics Parkinson's Earliest Symptoms
5. McGill-UBC project creates mouse grimace scale to help identify pain in humans and animals
6. Fat in Males, Females Differs Genetically, Mouse Study Shows
7. Ergonomic HandShoe Mouse Publish Proof of Unique Difference with Competition
8. Rheumatoid arthritis signaling protein reverses Alzheimers disease in mouse model
9. Treatment for S. aureus skin infection works in mouse model
10. Mouse Study May Help Explain Fish Oils Benefits
11. Mouse Study Reveals a Cancer Cell Escape Route
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Mouse model confirms mutated protein's role in dementia
(Date:12/9/2016)... ... 2016 , ... MEDI+SIGN®, a provider of fully-automated patient monitoring ... for Emergency Departments (ED) has been added to their portfolio. Housed in a ... and with a simplified pallet of information available to the patient, the Digital ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... ... December 08, 2016 , ... The West Virginia Medical Institute ... The name change aligns the entire company with its existing Quality Insights ... , “We are very proud of the achievements associated with the West Virginia ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... ... 08, 2016 , ... Russ DiGilio , founder and ... #QuackGivesBack campaign which supported local breast cancer organizations during National Breast Cancer Awareness ... Back initiative, and we’re very pleased with the participation in every franchisee’s ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... ... 08, 2016 , ... Mirixa Corporation , a leading ... pharmacist-delivered patient care services, has announced the promotions of Karen Litsinger to senior ... of sales. , Litsinger joined Mirixa in 2008 after serving as a ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... , ... December 08, 2016 , ... David J. ... global law firm Greenberg Traurig, LLP, will speak at DeviceTalks West, Dec. 12, 2016, ... the DeviceTalks series, and attorneys from the firm’s global Life Sciences & Medical Technology ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/9/2016)... December 9, 2016 External ... Single-Chamber ICD, Dual-Chamber ICD, Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Defibrillators ... Cardioverter Defibrillators The global defibrillators ... CAGR of 5.3% from 2016-2020 and CAGR of ... grow at a CAGR of 5.2% from 2016 ...
(Date:12/9/2016)... Research and Markets has announced the addition of the ... ... the global optical transceiver market to grow at a CAGR of ... the present scenario and the growth prospects of the global optical ... considers the revenue generated from the shipment of optical transceivers worldwide ...
(Date:12/9/2016)... 9, 2016 Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma Corporation (Head ... Director, CEO: Dr. Masayuki Mitsuka ) has presented ... given edaravone intravenously in 10-14 day cycles for 48 ... the ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised (ALSFRS-R). The data were ... ALS/MND in Dublin, Ireland . ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: