Navigation Links
Mothers abused by partners see decline in mental health even after relationship ends
Date:8/24/2010

COLUMBUS, Ohio Even after leaving a violent or controlling relationship, the mental health of mothers may actually get worse before it gets better, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that in the two years after the end of an abusive relationship, mothers showed poorer mental health, became more depressed and maintained high levels of anxiety. In those areas, they were no better off than women who stayed in abusive relationships.

However, abused mothers who had more social support fared better after the end of their relationship than did similar mothers with less help from friends and family.

"Our findings really help us understand how unstable those first few years are for mothers who leave violent or controlling relationships," said Kate Adkins, lead author of the study, who did the work as a doctoral student at Ohio State University.

"Even though getting out of the relationship may be good in the long run, they first have to deal with multiple sources of stress, including financial problems, single parenting and sharing custody with the abuser."

Adkins conducted the study with Claire Kamp Dush, assistant professor of human development and family science at Ohio State. Their results appear online in the journal Social Science Research and will be published in a future print edition.

The findings don't suggest that women shouldn't leave abusive partners, Kamp Dush emphasized.

"What our results mean is that these women still need a lot of support and a lot of services even after they leave. Family members and friends may think things are OK because she has left the abuser. But she still needs support and she still needs social services," Kamp Dush said.

The researchers used data from the Fragile Families and Child Well-being study, a project of Princeton and Columbia universities. They used data on about 2,400 mothers who were married to, or co-habiting with, the father of their child at the end of the first year of the three-study.

They separated the mothers into three groups: those who experienced no abuse, those in controlling relationships (in which fathers were extremely critical and insulting, and controlled her actions) and those in physically violent relationships. They also looked at whether those relationships continued or ended by the end of the three years.

In addition, women were tested for levels of depression and anxiety, and levels of social support and religious involvement.

Results showed that all women including those in non-violent relationships who stayed with their partners throughout the study showed higher levels of depression and anxiety by the end of the three years.

That was probably because of the nature of this sample, Adkins said. These were nearly all low-income and minority women who had just become mothers, so they were under a lot of stress, Adkins said.

However, those who stayed in violent and controlling relationships and those who left such unions showed significantly greater increases in depression and anxiety, compared to those left or who remained in non-violent relationships.

Why did women who left violent and controlling relationships continue to experience larger increases in depression and anxiety?

A key reason may have been that, because of the shared child, the mothers still had substantial contact with their abusers.

Findings showed that, of abused women whose relationship ended, about half talked to or saw the father once a week. Only about a quarter were in contact with him a few times a year or less.

"They might be going through a divorce, or working out child arrangements. Research shows that more than a third of women continue to experience physical abuse and 95 percent experience emotional abuse following the end of the relationship. All of this adds to the stress and anxiety they already feel," Adkins said.

The one sliver of good news was that abused women who had the support of friends and family did not show as much depression and anxiety as did women without that level of support.

"After the relationship ends, that is when these mothers really need the protection and help of their family and friends," Kamp Dush said.

Higher levels of religious involvement did not by itself protect abused mothers from depression and anxiety, the study found. However, it is possible that the religious involvement was associated with social support, and mothers received help and encouragement through people they met through their church activities, Adkins said.

Adkins, who is currently a family therapist working with domestic violence victims, said the results are consistent with what she sees in her practice.

"People often wonder why abused women don't leave their partners," she said. "But as this study shows, things aren't necessarily better after you leave an abuser, at least right away. It's a difficult process."

But these results shouldn't dissuade abused mothers from leaving their partners, particularly when there are safety concerns to themselves or to their children, she said.

"The number one reason to leave is safety, not only for the mothers but for their children as well. While things may not get better right away, we only looked at up to two years after the relationship ended. We're not sure what happens after that," Adkins said.


'/>"/>

Contact: Claire Kamp Dush
Kamp-dush.1@osu.edu
614-247-2126
Ohio State University
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. California IVF Discount/Rebate Program Eases Risk for Older Mothers
2. Medela Announces Launch of New Insurance Reimbursement Resource for New and Expectant Mothers
3. Study shows phyical therapy exercise program can reduce risk of postnatal depression in new mothers
4. More Than 100 Philadelphia Expectant-Mothers and Their Families to Attend Keystone Mercy Health Plan's Community Baby Shower
5. Perception of poor sleep may predict postpartum mood disturbances in healthy new mothers
6. Inspirational Short Video for Adults Who Celebrate Their Mothers Called "A Poem for Mothers" Released on YouTube
7. Beyond postpartum -- treating depression in mothers of older children
8. Buy Ma a Spa for Mothers Day This Weekend at Market Hall in Dallas at the Spa, Pool and Sauna Show
9. MyShoes.com, a New Search Engine for Women's Shoes, Features Chic Shoes for Expectant Mothers
10. More Than 100 Philadelphia Expectant-Mothers and Their Families to Attend Keystone Mercy Health Plan's Community Baby Shower
11. Mothers high blood sugar in pregnancy is linked to childrens reduced insulin sensitivity
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/23/2017)... California (PRWEB) , ... February 23, 2017 , ... ... Sports Development will host a diverse symposium on “Doping in Sport: ... Law and Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP. The symposium will be held ...
(Date:2/23/2017)... ... February 23, 2017 , ... ... it will soon begin franchising throughout the U.S. starting this spring. Current Meditation ... the practice of meditation mainstream. Current Meditation will be the first meditation concept ...
(Date:2/23/2017)... CA (PRWEB) , ... February 23, 2017 , ... CALNOC, ... FACP, FACMPE, FACPE, will keynote their upcoming conference – Empowerment, Value and Collaboration – ... the chairman and CEO of the Virginia Mason Health System in Seattle since 2000. ...
(Date:2/23/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Thomas Vas-Don suffered from severe injury due to ... able to successfully recover. In “ Origin & Insertion Charts for Massage Therapists ” ... principals of massage, anatomy , trigger points and referral pain patterns . ...
(Date:2/22/2017)... ... February 22, 2017 , ... Gevir, a New Zealand-based company that ... its products are coming soon to Amazon.com, the world’s largest online retailer. ... means to develop an effective natural treatment for Shelley’s Multiple Sclerosis, which she’d been ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/23/2017)... NEW YORK , Feb. 22, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... dominate medical implant demand, as aging demographic patterns ... heart-related conditions. Implants for sports- and exercise-related injuries, ... artery disease will lead sales gains. The future ... The study addresses the following questions and more: ...
(Date:2/23/2017)... YORK , Feb. 22, 2017 ... the non-hodgkin lymphoma partnering deals and agreements entered ... Read the full report: http://www.reportlinker.com/p03605669-summary/view-report.html ... Agreements since 2010 report provides understanding and access ... the world,s leading healthcare companies. - ...
(Date:2/23/2017)... , February 23, 2017 - For ... ... Rare Disease Day Open to All at http://www.shire.com/RareCount   ... announced the launch of ,Rare Count, in honor of Rare Disease ... which equates to nearly one in 20 global citizens. It is ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: