Navigation Links
Most Prefer That Men 'Pop the Question,' Survey Finds

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 13 (HealthDay News) -- You've come a long way, baby, but in matters of love and marriage this Valentine's Day, you'll probably let him do the asking.

Researchers from the University of California, Santa Cruz, found that a majority of men and women hold traditional views on proposals. Most women also said they would opt to take their husband's last name.

"I was surprised at how strong the preference was," Rachael Robnett, a doctoral candidate in psychology, said in a university news release.

"Given the prevalence of liberal attitudes among students at the university where data collection took place, it is striking that so many participants held traditional preferences," she said. "Even more surprising is that many participants overtly state that their preferences were driven by a desire to adhere to gender-role traditions."

In conducting the study, Robnett surveyed 277 undergraduates majoring or intending to major in psychology. All of the students were heterosexual and ranged in age from 17 to 26 years old.

Not one of the 136 men surveyed said he "would definitely want" his partner to propose. And none of the 141 women surveyed said they "would definitely want" to pop the question.

By contrast, two-thirds of women and slightly more than two-thirds of men "definitely" wanted the guy to do the asking, according to the study, which was published in the January issue of the Journal of Adolescent Research.

Only 9 percent of women and 17 percent of men said it didn't matter who proposed.

Sticking with traditional views on marriage, 60 percent of women were "very willing" or "somewhat willing" to take their husband's name. Only 6 percent of women were "very unwilling" and just 11 percent "somewhat unwilling" to change their name. Less than one-quarter of women were "neither willing nor unwilling" to take their husband's name.

The participants' traditional views on marriage were likely linked to "benevolent sexism," or the notion that "men should protect, cherish and provide for women," Robnett said.

"On the surface it looks positive. The problem is that benevolent sexism contributes to power differentials between women and men," Robnett noted. "The mindset underlying benevolent sexism is that women need men's protection because they are the weaker gender."

The notion of benevolent sexism is difficult to challenge because it's "usually viewed as politeness or chivalry," she said. She added, however, that people who endorse benevolent sexism tend to adhere to traditional marriage roles, including the idea that women should do most of the childrearing even if both partners work. "Research shows it often does a disservice to women," she said.

More information

The Pew Research Center provides more information on gender roles.

-- Mary Elizabeth Dallas

SOURCE: University of California, Santa Cruz, news release, Jan. 15, 2013

Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Majority of primary care physicians prefer delivering radiology test results to patients themselves
2. Implanted Defibrillator Patients Prefer Device Off if Very Ill: Survey
3. Coast Chiropractic Center Named as Power Liens Preferred Provider
4. Dr. Tal Morr - a Preferred Prosthodontics in Miami Area
5. Italian wolves prefer pork to venison
6. Fort Lauderdale Spine & Injury Center Named as Power Liens Preferred Provider
7. Cancer Survivors Prefer to Stay With Cancer Doctors: Study
8. Stressed-Out Men May Prefer Heavier Women
9. Integrated Services Becomes Preferred Rental Provider for Rural/Metro Corporation
10. Patients Prefer More Invasive Form of Colon Scan: Study
11. Facebook Users Take Unfriending Seriously, Survey Finds
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
Most Prefer That Men 'Pop the Question,' Survey Finds
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... The print ... USA Today in Atlanta, Dallas, New York, Minneapolis, South Florida, with a circulation ... is distributed nationally, through a vast social media strategy and across a network ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... Consistent ... sharing, the 2016 Building Better Radiology Marketing Programs meeting will showcase ... Sunday, March 6, 2016, at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas with a pre-conference ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... The moment you stop improving ... only fulfilling the needs of advisers and clients but going above and beyond ... top-tier customer service. However, there's always room for improvement, which is why the ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... (PRWEB) , ... November 27, 2015 , ... ... the largest, most successful and prominent nonprofit healthcare organizations in the country. They ... involvement with various organizations, and helped advance the healthcare industry as a whole ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... Indosoft ... announces the incorporation of Asterisk 11 LTS (Long Term Support) into its Q-Suite ... LTS brings Q-Suite 5.10 up-to-date with a version of Asterisk that will receive ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/27/2015)... UTRECHT , Niederlande, November 27, 2015 /PRNewswire/ ... mit fotodynamischer Bremachlorin-Therapie bei fortgeschrittenem Krebs.   ... fotodynamischer Bremachlorin-Therapie bei fortgeschrittenem Krebs.   --> ... fotodynamischer Bremachlorin-Therapie bei fortgeschrittenem Krebs.   ... berichtet. --> Clinical Cancer Research ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... Países Bajos, November 26, 2015 ... fotodinámica de Bremachlorin para el cáncer avanzado.   ... con la terapia fotodinámica de Bremachlorin para el cáncer ... enfoque combina la inmunoterapia con la terapia fotodinámica de ... Clinical Cancer Research . --> Clinical Cancer ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... -- Research and Markets ( ) has announced the ... to 2019 - Rise in Cardiac Disorders and Growing Awareness ... their offering. Boston scientific ... scientific and others. --> The market is ... Boston scientific and others. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: