Navigation Links
Most Patients Want Experienced Surgeons, Not Trainees
Date:9/23/2011

FRIDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital patients want to know whether medical trainees are participating in their surgery, according to a new study.

Researchers found that although most patients would allow residents and medical students to be involved in their operation, rates of consent vary depending on the type of surgery and the trainee's level of participation. The findings, they concluded, could have a significant impact on teaching programs.

"Currently, no widely accepted guidelines or policies exist for providing information regarding the role of surgical trainees to the patient during the informed consent process," the authors wrote. "The accepted standard is to provide information that 'a reasonable patient' would want and would need to know to make an informed decision, but this counseling may vary widely by health care professional, setting, and type of surgical procedure."

In conducting the study, researchers from Madigan Army Health System in Tacoma, Washington analyzed anonymous surveys from 316 patients to find out how they felt about surgical resident education and training programs.

The study, published online Sept. 19 in the Archives of Surgery, found most patients did not care if they were treated in a private hospital or a teaching one. The 91.2 percent of the patients who said they had a preference in where they were treated said they believed the care they would receive in a teaching hospital would be just as good or better than that in a private hospital.

Despite being supportive of teaching facilities, the vast majority of patients said they wanted to be informed if a trainee was going to participate in their operation, whether the procedure was considered major (95.7 percent) or minor (87.5).

Although 94 percent of the patients questioned said they would allow a surgical resident to be involved in their surgery, just 85 percent would agree to a surgical intern being included and only about 80 percent would allow a medical student to participate in their care.

When asked what role they would allow junior residents to have in their care, 57.6 patients said they could act as the first assistant. Only 25.6 percent said they would allow a junior resident to perform the operation if there was direct staff supervision, and a still smaller percentage -- 18.2 percent agreed the resident could participate without direct staff observation.

The study's authors concluded that informed consent is important to surgical patients, and their unwillingness to allow trainee participation in certain situations could have a significant impact on teaching facilities.

"Although most patients express an overall willingness to participate in surgical education, wide variations can be observed in the actual consent rates for specific training situations. This decreased willingness to consent and the potential effect on training programs must be considered when discussing policy initiatives aimed at improving informed consent," the authors wrote.

More information

The National Institutes of Health provides more information on informed consent.

-- Mary Elizabeth Dallas

SOURCE: JAMA/Archives, news release, Sept. 19, 2011.


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. ICU Patients at Risk for Rare Heart Rhythm Problem
2. Young patients with chronic illnesses find relief in acupuncture
3. For Some Breast Cancer Patients, Shorter Radiation Works Well
4. New Study Uses Adult Stem Cells in Effort to Save Limbs of Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease
5. Patients with Lethal Lung Disease Finally Receive Recognition by Social Security Administration
6. Behavioral therapy improves sleep and lives of patients with pain
7. Protecting patients: Study shows that Johns Hopkins flu vaccination rates twice national average
8. MSU researcher linking breast cancer patients with alternative therapies
9. New American Heart Association Survey Finds Heart Disease and Stroke Patients Face Significant Barriers in Obtaining Quality, Affordable Care
10. Fishy Smell May Keep Patients From Diabetes Drug
11. AGA offers new recommendations for CRC surveillance for certain patients with IBD
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Most Patients Want Experienced Surgeons, Not Trainees
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... Many families have long-term insurance that ... insurance companies have a waiver for care if the client has a cognitive impairment ... family pays for care, is often waived, so the benefits from their insurance start ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... ... giving viewers the lowdown on sciatica in a new episode of "Success Files," ... on current events and innovation and investigates each subject in-depth with passion and ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... sleep apnea using cutting-edge Oventus O2Vent technology. As many as 18 ... characterized by frequent cessation in breathing. Oral appliances can offer significant relief to ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... , ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... a leader in post-acute health care, have expanded their existing home health joint ... Health. , AccentCare has been operating a joint venture home health company with ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... 12, 2017 , ... On Saturday, October 21, the Health & Wellness Center ... to raise money for the American Heart Association Heart Walk. Teams of up to ... together to keep their treadmills moving for 5 hours. Treadmills will start at 7:00 ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/12/2017)... Divoti USA will engrave and process all non-coated stainless ... FDA requirements, which stipulates new criteria regarding medical device manufacture and ... ID jewelry such as Medical ID Bracelets, can rest assured that ... the new FDA requirements . ... Divoti offers this dark mark fiber laser engraving process with ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... , Oct. 11, 2017  Hill-Rom Holdings, Inc. ("Hill-Rom") ... Surgical facility in Las Piedras, Puerto Rico ... and blades. ... the facility sustained minor structural damage, temporary loss of ... Repairs have been completed, manufacturing operations have resumed, and ...
(Date:10/4/2017)... Oct. 4, 2017  South Korean-based healthcare product Development ... aide "cprCUBE" on Kickstarter. The device will educate the ... arrests with better efficiency compared to the dated and ... feedback on efficacy of the compression for a more ... a goal to raise $5,000. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: