Navigation Links
Most New EMS Recruits Overweight or Obese
Date:3/20/2009

Massachusetts finding has troubling implications for public safety, experts say

FRIDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- More than 75 percent of candidates for fire and ambulance services in Massachusetts are either overweight or obese, a situation that has major consequences for public health and safety, researchers say.

"First, cardiovascular disease and musculoskeletal injury are important causes of [disability and death] in emergency responders, and excess body fat is associated with higher risk for both. Second, because of the nature of emergency response work, any health condition suddenly incapacitating an emergency responder also potentially compromises the safety of his or her co-workers and the community," lead author Antonios Tsismenakis, a second-year medical student at Boston University School of Medicine, said in a news release.

A team from BUSM, Boston Medical Center, Harvard University and the Cambridge Health Alliance reviewed the pre-placement medical examinations of 370 firefighter and ambulance recruits assessed at two Massachusetts clinics between October 2004 and June 2007.

They found that 43.8 percent of the recruits were overweight, 33 percent were obese, and only 22 percent were normal weight.

Excess weight as measured by body-mass index (BMI) was associated with higher blood pressures, worse metabolic profiles and lower exercise tolerance on treadmill stress tests, the researchers said.

While all normal-weight recruits achieved the National Fire Protection Agency's recommended minimum exercise threshold of 12 metabolic equivalents, 42 percent of obese and 7 percent of overweight recruits failed to meet the criteria.

The study appears online March 19 in the journal Obesity.

"These findings are strong evidence against the common misconception in the emergency responder community that many of their members have BMIs in the overweight and obese ranges simply on the basis of increased muscle mass. Even in these young recruits, we documented a very strong association between excess BMI and an increased cardiovascular risk profile," study senior author Dr. Stefanos Kales, director of Occupational and Environmental Medicine Residency, Harvard School of Public Health, said in the news release.

More information

There's more on fighting overweight and obesity at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Boston Medical Center, news release, March 19, 2009


'/>"/>
Copyright©2009 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Cleveland Clinic Recruits World Renowned Heart Rhythm Specialist to Direct Electrophysiology
2. Ascension Orthopedics Closes $21 Million Financing and Recruits an Orthopedics Industry Veteran as CEO
3. NexCore Group Opens Chicago Office Recruits New Hires
4. AT-TEN-TION!!! Fit Club Veterans Take on New Recruits in an All New Season of Celebrity Fit Club: Boot Camp Premiering Thursday, March 13 at 9PM ET/PT
5. Niutang Recruits Seasoned Executive to Open U.K. Office
6. Reeve Foundation Recruits Distinguished Stem-Cell Neurobiologist - The Salk Institutes Samuel L. Pfaff, Ph.D. - to its International Research Consortium
7. NYPD Recruits Recognized for Giving Gift of Life
8. School-based overweight prevention program may cut risk of eating disorders among girls
9. Overweight toddlers and those not in day care at risk for iron deficiency
10. Lower metabolism, eating behavior possibly explain the cause of overweight in narcolepsy
11. Overweight Now a Global Problem
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Most New EMS Recruits Overweight or Obese
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... 25, 2016 , ... Dr. Calvin Johnson has dedicated his ... implemented orthobiologic procedures as a method for treating his patients. The procedure is ... to perform the treatment. Orthobiologics are substances that orthopaedic surgeons use to help ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... CA (PRWEB) , ... June 24, 2016 , ... A ... procedures that most people are unfamiliar with. The article goes on to state that ... but also many of these less common operations such as calf and cheek reduction. ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Marcy was in a crisis. Her son James, eight, ... at his family verbally and physically. , “When something upset him, he couldn’t control his ... it. He would throw rocks at my other children and say he was going to ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... , ... June 24, 2016 , ... ... offering micro-osteoperforation for accelerated orthodontic treatment. Dr. Cheng has extensive experience with all ... brackets , AcceleDent, and accelerated osteogenic orthodontics. , Micro-osteoperforation is a revolutionary ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... People across the U.S. ... magazine’s Code Talker Award, an essay contest in which patients and their families pay ... be presented at the 2016 National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) Annual Education Conference ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... June 24, 2016  Arkis BioSciences, a leading ... and more durable cerebrospinal fluid treatments, today announced ... Series-A funding is led by Innova Memphis, followed ... other private investors.  Arkis, new financing will accelerate ... the market release of its in-licensed Endexo® technology. ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... Any dentist who has made an implant supported ... Many of them do not even offer this as a ... laboratory costs involved. And those who ARE able to offer ... high cost that the majority of today,s patients would not ... Zadeh , founder of Dental Evolutions Inc. and inventor of ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... INDIANAPOLIS , June 23, 2016 Roche ... received 510(k) clearance for its Elecsys BRAHMS PCT (procalcitonin) ... severe sepsis or septic shock. With this clearance, Roche ... provide a fully integrated solution for sepsis risk assessment ... associated with bacterial infection and PCT levels in blood ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: