Navigation Links
Most 'Locked-In Syndrome' Patients Happy, Survey Finds
Date:2/24/2011

THURSDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Most "locked-in syndrome" patients -- a condition caused by brain stem injury -- claim to be happy, according to a new study.

People with locked-in syndrome are fully conscious but can't move or communicate, except through eye movements or blinking. Patients with the condition can live for decades.

In the new study, researchers surveyed 91 locked-in syndrome patients in France about their medical history, emotional state, and their views on end-of-life issues. About two-thirds of the patients had a partner and lived at home and 70 percent had religious beliefs, the investigators found.

Even though more than half of the patients acknowledged severe limitations on their ability to lead a normal life as a member of their community and 20 percent said they couldn't take part in everyday activities that they considered important, 72 percent of the patients said they were happy.

The finding that nearly three-quarters of the patients report being happy challenges the widespread belief that locked-in syndrome patients should be candidates for euthanasia or assisted suicide due to poor quality of life, the researchers pointed out.

The 28 percent of patients who said they were unhappy cited issues such as difficulty getting around, restrictions on recreational/social activities, and the challenges of coping with life events.

Among patients who had been affected by locked-in syndrome for less than one year at the time of the survey, feeling anxious and not recovering speech were also associated with being unhappy.

Among the 59 patients who responded to a question regarding whether they wanted to opt for euthanasia, only four (7 percent) said yes, the researchers noted.

"Our data show that, whatever the physical devastation and mental distress of [these] patients during the acute stage of the condition, optimal life-sustaining care and revalidation can have major long-term benefit," Marie-Aurelie Bruno, of the University Hospital of Liege in Belgium, and colleagues wrote in their report published Feb. 23 in the first issue of the new online journal BMJ Open.

"We suggest that patients recently struck by locked-in syndrome should be informed that, given proper care, they have a considerable chance of regaining a happy life. In our view, shortening-of-life requests by locked-in syndrome patients are valid only when the patients have been given a chance to attain a steady state of subjective well-being," they concluded.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has more about locked-in syndrome.

-- Robert Preidt

SOURCE: BMJ Open, news release, Feb. 23, 2011


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Study Says 2 Therapies Help Fight Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
2. Researchers identify the genotype of disorders causing cardiac sudden death syndrome
3. Figuring out fetal alcohol syndrome in fruit flies
4. Dry Eye Syndrome Common in Winter
5. Exercise improves symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome
6. Exercise improve symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome
7. Ovarian Cyst Syndrome May Raise Health Risks from Plastics Chemical
8. UBC-VCH researchers find critical link between Down syndrome and Alzheimers disease
9. Metabolic syndrome found in 52 percent of patients after liver transplantation
10. Vitamins C and E linked to metabolic syndrome in low-income Ecuadorians
11. Clinical trial for Rett syndrome launched
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Most 'Locked-In Syndrome' Patients Happy, Survey Finds
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... ... Dr. Ronald E. Hawkins, vice president for academic affairs ... Bell, DO, MBA, HPF, FACOEP-dist., FACEP, as the new dean of Liberty ... to Liberty from the Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine (OU-HCOM), where ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... February 24, 2017 , ... The narrative in “ Signal 8: ... ’s true account of his paramedic experiences. Schanssema describes the tragedies he saw, as ... attempts to overcome them. , Schanssema, initially unsure of the career path he wanted ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... , ... Indiana Fiber Network (IFN) President and CEO Kelly C. Dyer recently ... as the Chairman of the Management Committee when IFN was originally formed in 2002 ... of investor/owners and development of the business plan. He became the first paid ...
(Date:2/23/2017)... ... February 23, 2017 , ... Thinksport, the most ... Jensie Gran Fondo of Marin. For the second year in a row, cyclists ... sunscreen. , “We are thrilled to provide our safe, non-toxic sunscreen to over ...
(Date:2/23/2017)... ... February 23, 2017 , ... The American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association (ACPA) is pleased ... KLS is a longtime supporter of the event. , "We are pleased that KLS ... Dr. Bob Havlik, 2017 ACPA President. "KLS Martin has a long track record of ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/24/2017)... Feb. 24, 2017 Zimmer Biomet Holdings, Inc. ... healthcare, will present at the Cowen and Company 37 ... Marriott Copley Place on Tuesday, March 7, 2017 at ... webcast of the presentation can be accessed at ... following the conference via Zimmer Biomet,s Investor Relations website ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... , Feb. 24, 2017  In conjunction with ... 2016 financial results press release, you are invited to ... live over the internet on Tuesday, March 14, 2017 ... A live audio webcast of the presentation ... www.durect.com and clicking "Investor Relations."  If you are ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... 24. Februar 2017 ITL Limited, ( ... Gesundheitsbereiches, ist erfreut, für das zum 31. Dezember ... Vorjahreszeitraum exzellente Ergebnisse vorlegen zu können. Eine vollständige ... Wachstum" finden Sie hier . ... Steuern 2,12 Millionen USD (Dez. 2015: 1,04 Millionen USD; +104 %) ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: