Navigation Links
More Than 200,000 Suffer Cardiac Arrest in Hospitals Annually
Date:7/1/2011

FRIDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- More than 200,000 people are treated for cardiac arrest in U.S. hospitals every year, according to a new study.

Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine warned that rate may be on the rise.

The study, reported online June 24 in Critical Care Medicine, found that 21 percent of patients who suffer in-hospital cardiac arrest survive. That's much better than the less than 10 percent who typically survive cardiac arrest in other settings.

Yet the study's authors said more could be done to improve survival, including preventing cardiac arrest through more effective patient monitoring; administering CPR and defibrillation to restart the heart more quickly; and better adherence to resuscitation guidelines.

In cardiac arrest, the heart stops beating and the circulation of blood and oxygen to the brain and vital organs ceases. Death typically occurs within moments without chest compressions to get the blood circulating again and defibrillation, which delivers electrical shocks that can essentially jump-start the heart muscle.

Cardiac arrest is not the same as a heart attack, although a heart attack -- often caused by a blockage in an artery that interferes with blood flow to the heart -- can lead to cardiac arrest.

"Our study proves that cardiac arrest represents a tremendous problem for hospitals in the United States," said the study's lead author, Dr. Raina M. Merchant, an assistant professor of emergency medicine, in a university news release.

"Until now, we could only guess about how many patients were suffering these events," Merchant added. "These numbers finally provide us with a roadmap for improving allocation of resources to care for these critically ill patients and further our study of ways to identify patients who are at risk of cardiac arrest in the hospital and improve survival."

More information

The U.S. National Institutes of Health provides more information on cardiac arrest.

-- Mary Elizabeth Dallas

SOURCE: University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, news release, June 24, 2011


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. 200,000 patients treated for cardiac arrest annually in US hospitals, Penn study shows
2. California Day Spa - Osmosis Celebrates 25th Anniversary With Over 200,000 Cedar Enzyme Baths Given
3. Reno Children With Disabilities Profit From a Little Known but Internationally Recognized Non-Profit Organization as it Quietly Crosses the $200,000.00 Mark in Service Investment Into the Reno Area
4. Catholic Health East and BayCare Health System Pledge $200,000 to Rebuild Hospital in Port-Au-Prince
5. Scientists develop first ever drug to treat Celtic gene in cystic fibrosis sufferers
6. When Wives Cant Sleep, Marriage May Suffer
7. Group therapy helps MS sufferers cope with depression, study finds
8. Controlling partners suffer more conflict with sexual desire
9. Sex matters -- more men with migraine suffer from PTSD than women
10. Adults with arthritis suffer with poorer health related quality of life
11. Years Later, Victims of Critical Respiratory Illness Still Suffer
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/25/2016)... , ... June 25, 2016 , ... ... policy issues and applications at AcademyHealth’s Annual Research Meeting June 26-28, 2016, at ... on several important health care topics including advance care planning, healthcare costs and ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... ... As a lifelong Southern Californian, Dr. Omkar Marathe earned his Bachelors in ... School of Medicine at UCLA. He trained in Internal Medicine at Scripps Green Hospital ... at the UCLA-Olive View-Cedars Sinai program where he had the opportunity to train in ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... , ... June 24, 2016 , ... Those who have ... these feelings, many turn to unhealthy avenues, such as drug or alcohol abuse, as ... Michigan, has released tools for healthy coping following a traumatic event. , Trauma sufferers ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... Francisco, CA (PRWEB) , ... June 24, 2016 ... ... CitiDent, is now offering micro-osteoperforation for accelerated orthodontic treatment. Dr. Cheng has extensive ... self-ligating Damon brackets , AcceleDent, and accelerated osteogenic orthodontics. , Micro-osteoperforation ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... ... to recognize Dr. Barry M. Weintraub as a prominent plastic surgeon and the ... in the world, and the most handsome men, look naturally attractive. Plastic surgery ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/26/2016)... -- Story Highlights: , ... health care industry is causing providers to review operating ... offers a suite of solutions for health care providers ... optimization: labor resource analysis, revenue cycle optimization and physician ... and better economics ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... CAMBRIDGE, Mass. , June 24, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... the Spaulding Rehabilitation Network,s Dean Center for ... of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, MIT Hacking Medicine, ... Center for Innovation, today announced the five finalists ... Hackathon for Lyme disease.  More than 100 scientists, ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... BEIJING , June 24, 2016 Dehaier ... or the "Company"), which develops, markets and sells medical ... China , signed a strategic cooperation agreement with ... as "Hongyuan Supply Chain") on June 20, 2016, to ... Under the strategic cooperation agreement, Dehaier will leverage Hongyuan ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: