Navigation Links
More Proof Cranberry Juice Thwarts Infection
Date:7/9/2012

By Denise Mann
HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- Cranberry juice and cranberry supplements really do help prevent urinary tract infections, a new study confirms.

As many as 50 percent of women will develop at least one urinary tract infection in their lifetime, and up to 30 percent will develop recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs), according to the experts. So researchers have long debated what role -- if any -- cranberries and cranberry-containing products play in preventing or treating these painful infections.

For this new report, researchers from Taiwan analyzed 13 studies that compared cranberry-containing products to inactive placebo among a total of 1,616 individuals in North America and Europe. Most of the trials lasted six months.

The result? These longtime folk remedies provide protection against common urinary tract infections, especially among women, women with repeat infections, children, and those who drink cranberry juice instead of talking cranberry supplements, the researchers reported.

In addition, people who consumed the cranberry products twice a day got more protection than their counterparts who did so less frequently, according to the study, published July 9 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

"Cranberry-containing products could reduce the incidence rate of UTIs for people at high risk," said study author Dr. Chien-Chang Lee, director of the department of emergency medicine at National Taiwan University Hospital Yunlin Branch in Yunlin County.

Pregnant women, the elderly and people with neuropathic bladder -- an underactive bladder caused by damage to the nervous system -- are among those at high risk.

Exactly how cranberries help stave off urinary tract infections isn't fully known, but they may interfere with the attachment of bacteria to cells, potentially preventing infection.

Cranberry juice may be more effective than capsules or tablets. "This benefit might come from the additive or synergistic effect of unknown substances in the juice, which are devoid in cranberry capsules or tablets," Lee said. "Therefore, we recommend cranberry juice rather than cranberry tablets/capsules in prevention of UTIs despite its side effects."

"People taking cranberry juice for a long time might suffer from gastrointestinal upset," Lee said. "Cranberry capsules or tablets might prevent this side effect."

The high sugar content of some cranberry juices might also be a concern for someone with diabetes, the authors said.

Because of many differences in the studies and study populations included in this analysis, the results should be interpreted with caution, the authors added.

Not everyone is sold on the preventive powers of the bog berry. Dr. Elizabeth Kavaler, a urologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, said that cranberries and cranberry juice may be worth a try for the prevention of urinary tract infections. But "when you have a UTI, you have to treat it with antibiotics," she said.

"People who get UTIs often feel helpless because of no control over when they get one, so if the cranberries make them feel empowered, they are safe," she said. The best way to avoid urinary tract infections is to prime your immune system. This includes eating well, exercising and getting enough sleep.

Dr. Jill Rabin, chief of ambulatory care, obstetrics and gynecology and head of urogynecology at Long Island Jewish Medical Center in New Hyde Park, N.Y., said she has "always recommended" cranberry juice or cranberry products to prevent urinary tract infections. "It makes urine more acidic so it is harder for bacteria to accumulate on the bladder wall," she said.

Rabin agreed that cranberries are not a treatment for urinary tract infections. Also, not everyone can safely consume cranberry juice or pills, including individuals who take blood thinners, she said.

"Check your medications to make sure there are no contraindications," she advised.

Individuals with diabetes and those with compromised immune systems may be more prone to develop urinary tract infections. While there is no surefire way to prevent these infections, showering before and after having sex, and avoiding thong underwear may also make a difference, she said.

More information

The U.S. National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse talks about treating urinary tract infections.

SOURCES: Chien-Chang Lee, M.D., MSc, director, department of emergency medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital Yunlin Branch, Yunlin County, Taiwan; Elizabeth Kavaler, M.D., urologist, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City; Jill Rabin, M.D., chief, ambulatory care, obstetrics and gynecology, head of urogynecology, Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, N.Y.; July 9, 2012, Archives of Internal Medicine


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. No Proof That Gum Disease Causes Heart Disease, Experts Say
2. More Proof That Healthy Habits Fight Disease
3. Infection Might Raise Blood Clot Risk for Older Adults: Study
4. Junk DNA can sense viral infection
5. Pacemakers, Defibrillators Sources of Deadly Infections: Study
6. Children with juvenile arthritis have higher rates of bacterial infection
7. Arthritis in Children Linked to Infections
8. Study confirms early elevated HIV infection risk in some Step Study participants
9. Scripps Research scientists show how memory B cells stay in class to fight different infections
10. Infection Causes 1 in 6 Cancers Worldwide: Study
11. Living longer - variability in infection-fighting genes can be a boon for male survival
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
More Proof Cranberry Juice Thwarts Infection
(Date:8/16/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Ten outstanding teachers in the Greater Houston area will be ... a visit by a Houston Texans player, two tickets to a Texans game, and ... can visit texanschecking.com/stars to nominate their favorite teacher with an essay of no more ...
(Date:8/16/2017)... ATLANTA, Georgia (PRWEB) , ... August 16, 2017 ... ... practice in Atlanta, opened their doors. They celebrate 30 years in business this ... to create an up-to-date, inviting, tranquil space to serve their patients. , ...
(Date:8/16/2017)... ... August 16, 2017 , ... Maury Regional Health has announced ... draws. By broadly deploying AccuVein devices, Maury Regional Medical Center is making vein visualization ... out of a needle stick and more importantly, helps our staff members locate a ...
(Date:8/16/2017)... ... ... A global leader in the treatment of clubfoot, CURE International India ... the country one step closer to eliminating clubfoot as a lifelong disability by 2030. ... to enroll 10,000 children in the clubfoot treatment program in this year alone. , ...
(Date:8/16/2017)... Georgia (PRWEB) , ... August 16, 2017 , ... Fusion ... distribute premium original programming over four countries and millions of viewers in a partnership ... to rent or buy On-Demand and fully available on Blu Ray disc in 2018. ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:8/3/2017)... , Aug. 3, 2017  Opioid addiction and ... driving up healthcare costs and threatening outcomes, were problems ... supply and IVD industry that support them, met this ... market researcher said that drugs of abuse, procalcitonin and ... sessions at the organization,s 69th meeting in ...
(Date:8/2/2017)... CaryRx, a next-generation full-service pharmacy, has announced the ... in the Washington D.C. metropolitan area. ... delivery of medications through the convenience of its patient-friendly mobile ... within one hour to any location in D.C. ... invaluable service to Washington D.C. ," says ...
(Date:7/31/2017)... 7D Surgical, developer of ground breaking surgical navigation technologies, announced ... to support its strategic sales plan in Maryland ... 7D Surgical has entered into an exclusive sales representative agreement ... within those markets. ... Spartan Medical Purchases 7D Surgical ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: