Navigation Links
More Expensive Hospital Care May Not Mean Better
Date:2/23/2010

Analysis found costs and quality of hospitalization varied nationally

TUESDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals that spend more to treat patients don't necessarily have the best quality of care, researchers say.

In a study that analyzed national data on discharged Medicare patients who'd been hospitalized for congestive heart failure or pneumonia in 2006, researchers at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, found wide variation in the costs of care.

The average cost of care for a typical patient with congestive heart failure was $7,114, but ranged from $1,522 to $18,927 among 3,146 hospitals. The average cost of care for a typical patient with pneumonia was $7,040, but ranged from $1,897 to $15,829 among 3,152 hospitals, according to the study findings published in the Feb. 22 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

"Compared with hospitals in the lowest-cost quartile [one-fourth] for congestive heart failure care, hospitals in the highest-cost quartile had higher quality-of-care scores [89.9 percent vs. 85.5 percent] and lower mortality [death] for congestive heart failure [9.8 percent vs. 10.8 percent]," wrote Dr. Lena M. Chen and colleagues. "For pneumonia, the converse was true. Compared with low-cost hospitals, high-cost hospitals had lower quality-of-care scores [85.7 percent vs. 86.6 percent] and higher mortality for pneumonia [11.7 percent vs. 10.9 percent]."

The researchers also found that hospitals with lower costs had similar or slightly higher 30-day readmission rates (24.7 percent for congestive heart failure and 17.9 percent for pneumonia) than higher-cost hospitals (22 percent for congestive heart failure and 17.3 percent for pneumonia).

But the study found that patients initially seen at lower-cost hospitals still had lower overall costs of care over six months than those initially seen at higher-cost hospitals ($12,715 vs. $18,411 for congestive heart failure and $10,143 vs. $15,138 for pneumonia).

"Our findings did not support the hypothesis that hospitals seeking to lower cost of care by discharging patients earlier ultimately use more hospital resources over time," Chen and colleagues wrote. "Although low-cost hospitals had about 20 percent shorter length of stay, their patients had comparable or marginally higher readmission rates and substantially lower six-month total inpatient cost of care. Therefore, our findings suggest that initial lower hospital cost of care may not have a deleterious effect on long-term inpatient use."

More information

The U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality offers advice about finding quality health care.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, Feb. 22, 2010


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. An inexpensive dipstick test for pesticides in foods
2. Coverage of inexpensive drugs may increase length and quality of life after heart attack
3. Congressional Health Care Reform Proposals Would Make Health Care More Expensive, Reduce Benefits for Louisianians
4. Congressional Health Care Reform Proposals Will Make Health Care More Expensive, Less Robust for Ohioans
5. Freeze on Capital Expenditures Coinciding with Expiring Equipment Leases Lead to Expensive Lease Extensions
6. Expensive Health Care: Undetected, Unmet Mobility Needs Creating Boomer & Senior Health Care Costs
7. President Obamas Health Care Plan: Too Big, Too Expensive, Too Rushed
8. Ambulatory Surgery Centers Pivotal in Moving Outpatient Surgical Services Into Less Expensive, Clinically Appropriate Settings
9. Inexpensive depression screening tool works in resource poor countries
10. Inexpensive and Illegal Buttock - Boosting Injections Not Pretty
11. Inexpensive Test Can Help Prevent Lung Cancer Caused By Radon
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/27/2016)... SC (PRWEB) , ... May 27, 2016 , ... ... a line of classic American timber frame barn kits, which can be found on ... are inspired by historic American barn plans, and they highlight the craftsmanship of timber ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... ... ... An influential resource amongst nurses and professionals in the health care world, ... of topics detailing why we appreciate nurses in so many different ways. From exclusive ... being in a major recession to one of the hottest growing professions in any ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... ... May 27, 2016 , ... An ... bolstered by inspiring human-interest stories, courtesy of awareness-driven celebrities and thought leaders. It ... leading advocates, associations and industry leaders such as Bioness. , As patients ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... , ... May 27, 2016 , ... ... installment is bolstered by inspiring human interest stories, courtesy of leaders in the ... and tech within the industry, from leading advocates and associations—namely Jones & Bartlett ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... ... May 27, 2016 , ... ... the pharmaceutical, medical and food industries. Aside from its GMP accreditation, Validation Center ... proof of successfully certified products, services and staff. , Validation Center is ISO17025 ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/25/2016)... -- MedDay, a biotechnology company focused on the ... entitled "High doses of biotin in progressive multiple sclerosis: extension ... Professor Ayman Tourbah , Principal Investigator of the Phase ... of Neurology (EAN) in Copenhagen, Denmark . ... place on Sunday, 29 May 2016 from 14:45 to 16:15 ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... 2016 Niederländische Chirurgen haben ... es Ärzten erlaubt, ihre Expertise weltweit zu teilen ... Live Streaming mit einer Instant-Messaging-Funktion und der Möglichkeit, ... in Europa, Afrika, Asien und den ... Plattform registriert. Information und Weiterbildung   ...
(Date:5/24/2016)...   , Study met both ... superiority in , Excellent plus Good ... of the ascending colon   , ... today announced new positive data from the phase III MORA study ... 2 litre PEG with ascorbate. The study met both primary endpoints ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: