Navigation Links
More Evidence Whooping Cough Protection Wanes
Date:3/11/2013

By Serena Gordon
HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, March 11 (HealthDay News) -- Despite high levels of vaccination, the rate of whooping cough in the United States is at its highest level in decades, and one reason may be that immunity from the vaccine diminishes each year after the fifth dose is given.

New research from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) confirms what other recent studies have found: protection against whooping cough wanes significantly between the fifth dose of the vaccine -- given sometime during the 4- to 6-year-old age range -- and the adolescent booster vaccine given at 11 or 12.

"This study provides fairly strong evidence that the trends we're seeing are real -- and a couple of other studies with similar findings have recently come out," said study lead author Sara Tartof, who was at the CDC at the time of the study and is now a researcher at Kaiser Permanente in Los Angeles.

Nonetheless, "the vaccine is still a great tool," she said. "Kids who are fully vaccinated who get whooping cough have a much milder disease than those who aren't vaccinated. Vaccines are still the best protection against disease, and the incidence of whooping cough is low."

Whooping cough, which is also called pertussis, is a highly contagious bacterial disease that attacks the respiratory system. In 2012, the United States had the highest number of whooping cough cases since 1959, according to the CDC. During 2012, the CDC received reports of 41,000 cases and 18 deaths, with most of the deaths occurring in infants.

The whooping cough vaccine also includes immunizations for diphtheria and tetanus. It's given in a five-dose series at 2, 4 and 6 months; at 15 to 18 months; and between 4 and 6 years, according to the CDC. An adolescent booster is recommended between age 11 and 12.

The current study, published online March 11 in the journal Pediatrics, looked at children born between 1998 and 2003 in Minnesota or Oregon who had received the recommended five doses of the vaccine. By using immunization records and comparing them to state health department whooping cough surveillance data for six years following the fifth dose of vaccine, the researchers were able to more accurately track how many fully vaccinated youngsters got the illness, and how much protection the vaccine offered from year to year.

In Minnesota, nearly 225,000 children born during the study period were fully vaccinated. In Oregon, there were about 180,000. In Minnesota, 458 cases of whooping cough were reported; there were 89 reported in Oregon.

The rates of whooping cough rose each year of the follow-up period. During the first year after the final vaccination, the incidence of whooping cough was 15.6 per 100,000 in the Minnesota population. By the sixth year, that rate was 138.4 per 100,000. In Oregon, a similar trend emerged, with a rate of 6.2 per 100,000 in the first year of follow-up and 24.4 per 100,000 in the last year of follow-up.

The authors said many reasons may explain why whooping cough cases are on the rise. One may be that physicians simply are more aware of the disease and may be reporting it more often. Another possible cause is the vaccine itself, they noted.

The current vaccine is an acellular vaccine, which means it doesn't contain whole cells of the bacterium responsible for pertussis infections. The previous vaccine contained whole cells of the bacterium, but was more likely to cause side effects. One of the trade-offs for reducing side effects may be a vaccine that's slightly less effective, said Dr. Kenneth Bromberg, director of the Vaccine Research Center at the Brooklyn Hospital Center in New York City.

"This study adds to the strength of argument that the acellular vaccine doesn't seem to last as long as we might have thought it would," Bromberg said.

Both experts said there are no new whooping cough vaccines currently in development, so for now it's important that everyone get vaccinated: children, teens and adults. The more people who have protection against the disease, the less chance it will have to spread.

That's why the CDC now recommends that pregnant women receive the whooping cough vaccine during the third month of pregnancy, so they can pass protection on to their babies.

More information

To learn more about whooping cough, visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

SOURCES: Sara Tartof, Ph.D., M.P.H., researcher, Kaiser Permanente, Los Angeles; Kenneth Bromberg, M.D., chairman, pediatrics, and director, Vaccine Research Center, Brooklyn Hospital Center, New York City; April 2013 Pediatrics


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. First evidence that obesity gene is risk factor for melanoma
2. More Evidence That Smoking Raises Breast Cancer Risk
3. Evidence shows concussions require long-term follow-up for players
4. Review: Few effective, evidence-based interventions for children exposed to traumatic events
5. Reassuring evidence: Anticancer drug does not accelerate tumor growth after treatment ends
6. JSCM publishes issue on NIDRR-funded project on practice-based evidence in SCI rehabilitation
7. Review Finds No Evidence Alzheimers, Parkinsons Are Infectious
8. No Evidence That Lupus Drugs Lead to Cancer, Says Study
9. More Evidence Ties Heart Disease to Mental Decline
10. Patient expectations of acute bronchitis not consistent with the best evidence
11. More Evidence That Violent Video Games Help Spur Aggression
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
More Evidence Whooping Cough Protection Wanes
(Date:6/26/2016)... Lake Orion, Clarkston, Michigan (PRWEB) , ... June ... ... direction with respect to fertility once they have been diagnosed with endometriosis. These ... tolerable intercourse but they also require a comprehensive approach that can help for ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... FL (PRWEB) , ... June 25, 2016 , ... The temporary closing of Bruton Memorial ... Plant City Observer , brings up a new, often overlooked aspect of head lice: the ... closing for fumigation is not a common occurrence, but a necessary one in the event ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... As a lifelong Southern Californian, Dr. Omkar Marathe ... from the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. He trained in Internal Medicine ... his fellowship in hematology/oncology at the UCLA-Olive View-Cedars Sinai program where he had the ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... Montreal, Canada (PRWEB) , ... June 25, 2016 , ... ... the pursuit of success. In terms of the latter, setting the bar too high ... low, risk more than just slow progress toward their goal. , Research from ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... 2016 , ... June 19, 2016 is World Sickle Cell Observance Day. In ... benefits of holistic treatments, Serenity Recovery Center of Marne, Michigan, has issued ... Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is a disorder of the red blood cells, which can ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... June 23, 2016 Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; ... for its Elecsys BRAHMS PCT (procalcitonin) assay as a ... septic shock. With this clearance, Roche is the first ... integrated solution for sepsis risk assessment and management. ... infection and PCT levels in blood can aid clinicians ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... Capricor Therapeutics, Inc. ... company focused on the discovery, development and commercialization ... in its ongoing randomized HOPE-Duchenne clinical trial (Halt ... its 24-patient target. Capricor expects the trial to ... 2016, and to report top line data from ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... -- Bracket , a leading clinical trial technology and ... platform, Bracket eCOA (SM) 6.0, at the 52 nd ... 2016 in Philadelphia , Pennsylvania.  A demonstration ... of its kind to fully integrate with RTSM, will be ... is a flexible platform for electronic clinical outcomes assessments that ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: