Navigation Links
Monkey Study Suggests Long-Term Use of ADHD Drugs Safe
Date:7/19/2012

THURSDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term use of drugs to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) does not affect brain development or increase the risk of drug abuse, according to a study conducted in monkeys.

Monkeys are good for this type of research because they have relatively long periods of childhood and adolescence that feature hormonal and physical changes much like those that occur in humans, explained the researchers from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, N.C.

The ages of the 16 juvenile monkeys used in this study were equivalent to 6- to 10-year-old humans. Eight of the monkeys received an extended-release form of the ADHD drug Ritalin for more than a year, which is equivalent to about four years in human children. Eight other monkeys in a control group did not receive any drug treatment.

Imaging scans of all the monkeys' brains were conducted before and after the study, to detect any changes in brain chemistry and structure. The researchers also assessed the monkeys' physical growth.

"After one year of drug therapy, we found no long-lasting effects on the neurochemistry of the brain, no changes in the structure of the developing brain," Linda Porrino, chairwoman of Wake Forest's physiology and pharmacology department, said in a university news release. "There was also no increase in the susceptibility for drug abuse later in adolescence."

"We were very careful to give the drugs in the same doses that would be given to children," she added. "That's one of the great advantages of our study is that it's directly translatable to children."

The study was published online in the July issue of the journal Neuropsychopharmacology.

As many as 5 percent to 7 percent of elementary school children in the United States have been diagnosed with ADHD, which is a behavioral disorder that causes inattention, hyperactivity, impulsivity or a combination of these traits.

Many children with ADHD are prescribed drugs, but little is known about their long-term effects.

"Our study showed that long-term therapeutic use of drugs to treat ADHD does not cause long-term negative effects on the developing brain and, importantly, it doesn't put children at risk for substance abuse later in adolescence," Porrino said.

Although monkeys are similar to humans, the results of this research may not be the same in humans.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Mental Health has more about attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.

-- Robert Preidt

SOURCE: Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, news release, July 18, 2012


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Researchers see BPA effects in monkey mammary glands
2. University of Texas Medical Branch to study hospital readmission
3. Fatal Car Crashes Less Likely in Major Cities, CDC Study Finds
4. Study implements community-based approach to treat HIV-infection in rural Uganda
5. Herbal remedy used to treat hepatitis C proves ineffective, Penn study finds
6. Surgery Not Best Option for Early Stage Prostate Cancers: Study
7. Kids Sexual Behavior Influenced by Movie Scenes: Study
8. New study: Elderly Medicare beneficiaries most satisfied with their health insurance
9. Study Gives First Evidence That Adult Human Lungs Can Regrow
10. Study shows colon and rectal tumors constitute a single type of cancer
11. Spouses of severe-sepsis patients at high risk of depression, U-M study shows
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Monkey Study Suggests Long-Term Use of ADHD Drugs Safe
(Date:4/25/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... April 25, 2017 , ... ... support, and collaboration, announces Mirroring360 Pro . This new addition to the ... collaboration experience for education and business. , Mirroring360 Pro enables educators, business professionals ...
(Date:4/25/2017)... ... April 25, 2017 , ... ... and HR decision-makers are preparing for how his administration could impact the employee ... insight into what changes are most likely to make it through Congress. His ...
(Date:4/25/2017)... ... April 25, 2017 , ... Patients who would like ... in a fraction of the time as traditional braces – Wilckodontics®. Dr. Victoria ... now offers this revolutionary treatment with or without a referral. , Wilckodontics ...
(Date:4/25/2017)... ... ... Buyers and sellers in the thriving multi-billion dollar cannabis marketplace – from ... be heartened by the industry’s current surge. But another thing that unifies them is ... At last they can simply, safely and effectively end their aroma anguish thanks to ...
(Date:4/25/2017)... ... April 25, 2017 , ... There is no better place in South Florida ... report in the May issue of Consumer Reports focused on heart health. , ... achieved during and after coronary bypass and aortic valve replacement procedures. , Consumer ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/18/2017)... DUBLIN, Ohio , April 18, 2017  Cardinal ... its Non-GAAP 1 fiscal 2017 earnings per share ... 2018 and 2019.  This is in conjunction with this ... Care, Deep Vein Thrombosis and Nutritional Insufficiency businesses. ... EPS from continuing operations will be at the bottom ...
(Date:4/18/2017)... April 18, 2017 Viverae ® , a ... the integration of IBM ® Watson Campaign Automation, ... targeted communications for a personalized experience. Through digital engagement, ... their health in real time. The enhanced experience drives ... to members, wherever they are in their journey to ...
(Date:4/18/2017)... 18, 2017  Astute Medical, Inc., developer of biomarkers ... be presented at the 2017 National Kidney Foundation (NKF) ... continues through April 22. Physicians will present data on ... assess risk for acute kidney injury (AKI) during the ... Elevated levels of TIMP-2 and IGFBP-7 ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: