Navigation Links
Moms May Use TV to Calm Fussy Infants: Study
Date:1/7/2013

By Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Many babies spend almost three hours in front of the TV each day, a new study finds, especially if their mothers are obese and TV addicts themselves, or if the babies are fussy or active.

"Mothers are using television as a way to soothe these infants who might be a little bit more difficult to deal with," said senior study author Amanda Thompson, assistant professor of anthropology at the University of North Carolina, in Chapel Hill.

Other studies have shown that TV watching at such an early age can be harmful, she said, adding that TV can delay important developmental milestones.

The report was published online Jan. 7 and in the February print issue of the journal Pediatrics.

For the study, Thompson's team looked at more than 200 pairs of low-income black mothers and babies who took part in a study on obesity risk in infants, for which families were observed in their homes.

Researchers found infants as young as 3 months were parked in front of the TV for almost three hours a day. And 40 percent of infants were exposed to TV at least three hours a day by the time they were 1 year old.

Mothers who were obese, who watched a lot of TV and whose child was fussy were most likely to put their infants in front of the TV, Thompson's group found. TV viewing continued through mealtime for many infants, the researchers found. Mothers with more education were less likely to keep the TV on during meals.

Obese mothers are more likely to be inactive or suffer from depression, Thompson said. "They are more likely to use the television themselves, so their infants are exposed to more television as well," she said.

Thompson is currently doing a study to see if play and other alternatives can help these moms get their babies away from the television.

Another expert said the study sheds more light on the issue of TV overexposure at such a young age.

"This is further evidence that certain children, particularly vulnerable children, have environments early on that are not conducive to optimizing their mental health," said Dr. Dimitri Christakis, director of the Center for Child Health, Behavior and Development at the Seattle Children's Research Institute and a professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine.

Christakis noted that 50 percent of kids from this type of background start kindergarten lacking basic skills.

That so many kids are watching TV early is "shocking and disconcerting," he said. He pointed out that children this age are awake for only 10 or 12 hours a day, but 40 percent of these kids are spending a third of their waking hours in front of a television.

"In many cases they're strapped in," Christakis said. "Early television viewing is associated with attention problems and with cognitive delays, and it's harmful to babies' brain development."

For these reasons, the American Academy of Pediatrics discourages TV viewing before the age of 2 years, Christakis noted.

"We know there is nothing better for young children's brains than real-world human interaction," he said, adding that the brain develops in direct response to external stimulation.

The extended TV watching among these children comes at a big cost, Christakis said. "Both in terms of displaced external activity, such as play or being read to, but also television is overly stimulating -- inappropriately stimulating to the developing brain," he said.

Melissa Salgueiro, a psychologist at Miami Children's Hospital, concurred that "children should not be exposed to TV before age 2." Even then, she said, TV should be limited to 30 minutes per day, with parents finding other activities -- such as play -- to calm their children.

More information

For more about kids and TV watching, visit the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

SOURCES: Amanda Thompson, Ph.D., assistant professor, anthropology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Dimitri Christakis, M.D., M.P.H., director, Center for Child Health, Behavior and Development, Seattle Children's Research Institute, and professor, pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine; Melissa Salgueiro, Psy.D., psychologist, Miami Children's Hospital; February 2013 Pediatrics


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Study Suggests Vaccine May Help Kids With Brain Cancer
2. Study reveals how cancer drug causes diabetic-like state
3. Coffee Drinking in Pregnancy Wont Lead to Sleepless Baby: Study
4. Lower GI problems plague many with rheumatoid arthritis, Mayo Clinic study finds
5. Veggies Like Broccoli, Cabbage May Help Fight Breast Cancer: Study
6. No Added Cancer Risk From Hip Replacement Materials: Study
7. Reported Decline in U.S. Pneumonia Deaths May Be False: Study
8. Early Study Finds Some Promise for Lung Cancer Vaccine
9. Narcissists Often Ace Job Interviews, Study Finds
10. Sexual objectification of female artists in music videos exists regardless of race, MU study finds
11. Soy may alleviate hot flashes in menopause, large-scale study finds
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Moms May Use TV to Calm Fussy Infants: Study
(Date:2/21/2017)... ... 21, 2017 , ... Atlanta-based Jvion, the leading cognitive clinical ... IT practice. Predixion, which raised $42M+ to date, received $20M in its ... GE Ventures, and Software AG , will bring top industry talent and an ...
(Date:2/21/2017)... ... February 21, 2017 , ... CLICKco LLC, ... announced its products are now available for purchase on RonnieColemanNutrition.com, a popular website ... become popular among health-conscious consumers who love coffee but are looking to add ...
(Date:2/20/2017)... ... 21, 2017 , ... Nancy Johnston Toll marks her debut in ... Over the Bump in the Road ” (published by Xlibris). Inspired from her personal ... with the ups and downs experienced by anyone going through cancer treatment and how ...
(Date:2/20/2017)... Orlando, FL (PRWEB) , ... February 20, 2017 ... ... Director, beth[at]orbitahealth[dot]com, +1 (414) 213-8818 , Orbita, Inc., a leading provider of innovative ... software-as-a-service solution for increasing patient engagement and optimizing care journey management for home ...
(Date:2/20/2017)... ... February 20, 2017 , ... Today, Biscom , the ... the first IoT device from Biscom designed to deliver confidential patient information securely ... at HIMSS17 and will be conducting demonstrations at Booth #374. ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/20/2017)... , Feb. 20, 2017   MedPlast, Inc. ... device industry, announced today that it has signed ... Device Manufacturing Services business.   The acquisition broadens ... as a leading services provider to the world,s ... will further expand the company,s capabilities in assembly ...
(Date:2/20/2017)... Provides understanding and access to the ... by the worlds leading healthcare companies. Download ... The Global Renal Failure Partnering Terms and Agreements ... partnering deals and agreements entered into by the ... in partnering deals - Top deals by ...
(Date:2/20/2017)... NEW YORK , Feb. 20, 2017 ... imaging technique that creates detailed images of the organs ... a magnetic field and radio waves. The technique does ... the study of brain function or growth of cancer. ... such as neurology, cardiology, oncology, musculoskeletal, and orthopedics. Hence, ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: