Navigation Links
Molecules might identify high-risk acute-leukemia patients
Date:1/15/2008

COLUMBUS, Ohio New research suggests that certain small molecules used by cells to control the proteins they make might also help doctors identify adult acute-leukemia patients who are likely to respond poorly to therapy.

Researchers say the findings should improve the understanding of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and could lead to new therapies for patients with few treatment options.

The study examined the levels of molecules called microRNAs in leukemia cells from 122 patients with high- and intermediate-risk AML and in normal blood stem cells from 10 healthy donors.

The findings showed that both the leukemia cells and their normal counterparts had similar kinds of microRNA, but that the two groups differed in the levels of miRNAs present.

The research also identified two microRNAs present at abnormally high levels that were clearly associated with patient survival.

The investigators verified their findings in an additional group of 60 patients using a different technology.

The study, published online Jan. 10 in the journal Blood, was led by researchers with The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center and the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center.

If our results are validated by other groups, these two elevated microRNAs can be used to determine which patients require more aggressive treatment, says first author Dr. Ramiro Garzon, assistant professor of internal medicine and a researcher with The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center.

In addition, they may provide new targets for future therapies knocking out these two microRNAs might benefit patients who have a poor prognosis.

This possibility is particularly intriguing, he says, because the two microRNAs called miR-191 and miR-199a are also associated with cancers of the lung, prostate, colon, stomach and breast. This suggests that they may be part of a common cancer pathway.

Garzon noted that the study also found an association between high levels of a microRNA called miR-155 in AML patients and a gene mutation called FLT3-ITD. High levels of this microRNA have been reported in other cancers and to cause leukemia in mice.

Clearly, our findings suggest that the quantity of microRNAs present is important in cancer, suggesting that modulating their levels might offer an effective way to treat the disease in these patients, he says.

For this study, Garzon and his colleagues used blood samples from newly diagnosed AML patients who had either normal-looking chromosomes, a feature that indicates intermediate risk of recurrence, or other chromosome alterations. These included isolated trisomy 8, the t(11q23) translocation and multiple chromosomal abnormalities that signal a high risk of recurrence.

Together, these groups make up the majority of the 13,400 people expected to be diagnosed with AML in 2007. About 9,000 people that year were expected to die of the disease.

Our efforts now should concentrate on characterizing how these altered microRNAs might promote leukemia and on developing drugs designed to inhibit their action, Garzon says.


'/>"/>

Contact: Darrell E. Ward
Darrell.Ward@osumc.edu
614-293-3737
Ohio State University Medical Center
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. New class of RNA molecules may be important in human cancer
2. Study Describes Molecules That Control Blood Pressure
3. Researchers identify molecules with interesting anti-clotting properties
4. Major Advance in the Observation of DNA Molecules
5. Molecules can block breast cancers ability to spread
6. Tiny RNA Molecules Control Breast Cancers Spread
7. Fish Oil Might Help Relieve MS
8. HIV Drug Might Fight Cancer
9. High and mighty: first common height gene identified by researchers behind obesity gene finding
10. Vitamin C Plus Fat Might Spur Cancer
11. Mathematics might save you a trip to the ER
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/27/2016)... ... 2016 , ... This campaign aims to provide a path to improved education ... control and change. , As nearly 795,000 Americans suffering from a new or recurrent ... Plus, with an estimated 129,000 of these people dying from stroke, it’s become our ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... ... May 27, 2016 , ... Aimed at nurses and employees ... stories, courtesy of leaders in the nursing and health care industry. It also ... advocates and associations—namely Jones & Bartlett Learning. , Jones & Bartlett Learning is ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... May 26, 2016 , ... Despite last week’s media reports ... Yellen and company to wait until March 2017 for an interest rate increase, according ... Robinson College of Business. , “The Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) dot charts are ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... May 26, 2016 , ... ... and clinical outcomes, hosted members and suppliers for its inaugural Member Conference at ... on their mission of elevating the operational health of America’s healthcare providers. , ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... Florida (PRWEB) , ... May 26, 2016 , ... ... House® Project offering a new model of care for living and healing, celebrated ... core values: Meaningful Life in a Real Home provided by Empowered Staff. , “This ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/26/2016)... , May 26, 2016   ... software and analytics, network solutions and technology-enabled ... announced it entered into a strategic channel ... of outpatient software solutions and revenue cycle ... specialty hospitals and rehabilitation clinics to optimize ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... GERMANTOWN, Maryland , May 25, 2016 ... bedient dringenden Bedarf zur ... QIAGEN N.V. (NASDAQ: QGEN ; Frankfurt ... und Entwicklungsvereinbarung mit Therawis Diagnostics GmbH zur Entwicklung ... zu sein. Ein erstes Projekt wird die Entwicklung ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... 2016 According to market research ... and Demand Forecast to 2022 - Industry Insights by ... published by P&S Market Research, the global insulin delivery ... and it is expected to grow at a CAGR ... pump segment is expected to witness the fastest growth ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: