Navigation Links
Molecules involved in rheumatoid arthritis angiogenesis identified
Date:5/16/2014

Two protein molecules that fit together as lock and key seem to promote the abnormal formation of blood vessels in joints affected by rheumatoid arthritis, according to researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine, who found that the substances are present at higher levels in the joints of patients affected by the disease.

Their results are reported in the journal Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases.

"Our results show, for the first time, that these two proteins a receptor and its corresponding binding protein - play a key role in the progression of rheumatoid arthritis pathology," said Shiva Shahrara, associate professor of rheumatology at UIC.

Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease in which the body's own defenses attack the tissues lining the joints, causing painful swelling and bone erosion that can ultimately lead to joint deformities.

One of the hallmarks of rheumatoid arthritis is the development of new blood vessels, or angiogenesis, in the joints.

"The swelling of joints is caused by the abnormal migration of a variety of different cell types into the joint," Shahrara said. "And as these cells accumulate, they need to be supplied with oxygen and nutrients, and so angiogenesis accompanies the joint swelling."

Shahrara and her colleagues knew that a protein called CCL28 was found in the body under low oxygen conditions, or hypoxia. Joints affected by rheumatoid arthritis can become hypoxic, so the researchers wanted to see if the protein and its receptor could be found in patients' affected joints.

The researchers measured the levels of the proteins in the tissues and fluid of joints from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and with osteoarthritis, the more common joint inflammation caused by physical wear and tear. Patients of both types had protein levels in their joints that were significantly higher than individuals without joint disease.

The investigators found that CCL28, which is over-produced in joints affected by rheumatoid arthritis, attracts the surface-lining cells that carry its receptor.

When the researchers added CCL28 to cells carrying the receptor, the cells organized into blood vessels. But if they chemically blocked the receptor and added CCL28, formation of blood vessels was reduced.

The finding, Shahrara said, provides "strong evidence" that the binding of CCL28 to joint-lining cells carrying its corresponding receptor is a necessary step in angiogenesis.


'/>"/>

Contact: Sharon Parmet
sparmet@uic.edu
312-413-2695
University of Illinois at Chicago
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. A new method for clicking molecules together
2. Novel small molecules used to visualize prostate cancer
3. Small molecules in the blood might gauge radiation effects after exposure
4. Molecules generated that can halt metastasis of colon cancer
5. Measuring molecules with the naked eye
6. Prions in the brain eliminated by homing molecules
7. Identified 2 new genes involved in the more aggressive prostate cancer
8. AMPK and inflammatory mediators are involved in postoperative cognitive dysfunction
9. Identification of genetic mutations involved in human blood diseases
10. Scientists discover new protein involved in lung cancer
11. Same cell death pathway involved in three forms of blindness, Penn team finds
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/2/2016)... ... 02, 2016 , ... The Beryl Institute announces the publication ... international, open access, peer-reviewed journal focused on research and proven practices around understanding ... authors, the third volume of PXJ continues to expand PXJ's reach both with ...
(Date:5/2/2016)... ... ... As directed by its board of directors during its April 26 meeting, The ... nurse practitioners (CNP) to practice to the full scope of their license without the ... and 3,600 hours. , In addition, HAP supports CNPs who are licensed in another ...
(Date:5/2/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... May 02, 2016 , ... Pets bring ... a token of appreciation, pet owners celebrate National Pet Week, which falls on the ... 2016, remind pet owners to cherish the human-animal bond and recognize responsible pet ownership. ...
(Date:5/2/2016)... ... May 02, 2016 , ... Beanfields, PBC, makers of ... with college students at University of Colorado in Boulder to create new advertising ... class in the School of Journalism, who selected Beanfields as the brand on ...
(Date:5/2/2016)... ... May 02, 2016 , ... The Civilian Corps of the U.S. Army Medical ... that care for its uniformed service members, the retired service members, their families and ... 6th through May 12th National Nurses Week. It acknowledges the hard work and dedication ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/2/2016)... YORK , May 2, 2016 Kalorama ... EMR (Electronic Medical Records) market in a recent white ... sales, vendor switches, Increased physician usage, a growing market are ... were noted in Kalorama,s report EMR 2016: ... report marks Kalorama,s seventh complete study of the EMR ...
(Date:5/2/2016)... 2016 Leading Economies with Fastest Real GDP Annual Percentage ... Uzbekistan 8 Ireland 7.8 India 7.3, , Source: IMF and ... which comprises of Brazil , Russia , ... South Africa , registered the fastest GDP growth during the first decade ... , recession in Brazil and Russia ...
(Date:5/2/2016)...  Deerfield announced today it led the $44.5 ... Graybug Vision is an early stage pharmaceutical company ... for ocular diseases including wet age-related macular degeneration ... developed at Johns Hopkins University and has been ... Graybug Vision is developing ophthalmology products enabling ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: